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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
I just realized I forgot to paste the links to my post. One of the links is similar to the telescoping gauge you linked to at Grainger, although much cheaper. The other is a dial gauge. I like the simplicity of the less expensive telescoping gauge.

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I just realized I forgot to paste the links to my post. One of the links is similar to the telescoping gauge you linked to at Grainger, although much cheaper. The other is a dial gauge. I like the simplicity of the less expensive telescoping gauge.
Right, me too. I have some fancy mitutoyo inside mics, and they work fine, but I find the simple telescoping gauges faster and just as accurate for most purposes.

What Charles posted is the real stuff :)
 

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real but cheap, compared to name brand, i get a good idea, than leave the rest to the auto engine machine shop, at least if i find, say it's worn 018 and going to be 030 over when bored i can safely order new pistons to that size,
i refuse to say it's dead on , it's not as good as if it was a mitutyo or a starrett that the shop uses than they get PAID to be dead on since they machine and build race motors
 

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Right.

I've done enough precision machine work to know it takes good tools, discipline, and time. One of the lovely things about our gravelys is that there's very little in there which requires the kind of precision that goes into a race engine. The L model gravelys are REALLY tolerant. That's why in post 36 I advocated a somewhat sleazy approach. I'd never do that kind of thing on my 550hp small block hot rod. But for a gravely? Sure.
 
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Right.

I've done enough precision machine work to know it takes good tools, discipline, and time. One of the lovely things about our gravelys is that there's very little in there which requires the kind of precision that goes into a race engine. The L model gravelys are REALLY tolerant. That's why in post 36 I advocated a somewhat sleazy approach. I'd never do that kind of thing on my 550hp small block hot rod. But for a gravely? Sure.
do i ever hear you.
gravelys, iron kohlers, brigs i will use the old lisle 4 arm hone to bore them over, course stones to about 003 near, than fine stone the last 3 or 4 thousands till i'm in spec, while i have both small and large hones depending on the bore size f i would never use them on a street or race motor, that is machine shop,
than there is a simple rering job i don't use the big hone i use a ball hone with great results, which in this case is perfect ,break the glaze only no chance of accidently oversizing the bore run it for another 20 years
 

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I'd say somebody ran that machine a while very low on oil.
Very likely low on oil but some sort of elimination would help verify this.

I'm still narrowing down the cause of the scoring. Defiantly lack of lubrication. The piston and jug walls get a pressurized shot of lub with every crank rotation. Oil shoots out the hole(s) in the rod. If the crank pin is clogged then no oil will squirt out the rod. The other possibility is the oil pick up screen is clogged.

Both can be eliminated but it will take additional effort.

I always prime the crank pin (fresh bottom end rebuild) and rod before installing the piston by using a low pressurized container on a block fitting. You can see the oil coming out the rod hole.

To check the pick-up screen simply remove the LH axle housing and clean the sump. Often overlooked but it will reveal issues....

If the tractor is a keeper, time invested is precious on reliable, dependable service.

Just a few thoughts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 · (Edited)
I always prime the crank pin (fresh bottom end rebuild) and rod before installing the piston by using a low pressurized container on a block fitting. You can see the oil coming out the rod hole.
Thanks for sharing this information. I’m trying to visualize the container on a block fitting, but am having some difficulty. You don’t happen to have a pic do you?
 

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You don’t happen to have a pic do you?
(y)

Set your compressor regulator at 15 psi
container is part of a mity vac tool
Attach compression fitting to the tractor as shown in lower pic
Rotate crank to position of the hole in crank (I will add more pics showing location tomorrow)
Apply air pressure and monitor oil entering crank pin and exiting the rod hole (approx 1/2 the container)

Hope this helps.
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,yes prefilling the oil filter all the time,
I have to much free time. :unsure:
On a fresh lower end rebuild you are waiting for oil pressure to build up. Why wait? Engine is running and there is no motor oil lube on the jug, cams while waiting. Sooner it sprays out the rod the better....
Recall also the oil passage is also lubing the hi/low planetary at this time as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Thanks for the explanation and pics. Seems straightforward enough. What happens though if the crank is not rotated to the proper position?

I used that Permatex assembly lube when putting my CCKA back together. When would the Lubriplate assembly grease be used?
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
You posted those pics right as I was typing my prior post. Thanks for posting them. I think I see now—the oil wouldn’t be visible without the crank in the proper position.

I really appreciate everybody’s help. I learn so much here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Is there just the one hole in the end of the rod?

BTW, for what it’s worth—I’m glad you all have the free time and willingness to help out people like me who know next to nothing about this stuff!
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
So these are the steps I’ll take. Feel free to interject if I am missing something.

1. Drain the oil
2. Remove left side axle housing and inspect and clean out oil pick up screen.
3. Reassemble axle housing. (Replace gasket/seal while doing this?)
4. Connect compressor at 15 PSI as shown above, and ensure crank is in correct position.
5. Apply air and watch for oil to exit rod hole.
6. Reconnect oil line and fill back up with oil.
 
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