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Discussion Starter #21
Turf are better in grass and snow but load up and don't clean out as well on dirt and mud.

R4s are fine in snow if you have weight on the back for traction but they are not as good as turfs in the snow.

I push a lot of snow with my R4s with no problem but I have 500 pounds of ballast on the three point.

If you're going to be working in dirt a lot I'd get the R4s.

If this is your primary mower and snow Pusher I would get turfs.

I have a GC 2400 similar size as the one you're looking at. I do not mow with it.
It will be by primary mower and snow pusher.

Bill
 

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Bob, that is a pretty broad statement.... On my X748 I have found limited changed in snow performance from my HDAP's to R4's. Both perform well and the R4's outperform any other tires I have tried for loader performance.
Kyle, I don't know your specific snow conditions, but I was out of commission a couple of years ago and had to get my neighbor to clear my driveway. (The first time in almost 50 years that I had to get someone else to do my driveway!) The R4s struggled to find traction in 18" of snow and it was frustrating watching the show. A few weeks later, I had the opportunity to use that tractor for another 18" dump and I proved to myself that it was the tires that were the problem in the first 5 minutes. It either needed some serious weight on the 3PH or a set of tire chains.

My 2wd GT in the same conditions with a bigger, wider bucket and chained turfs would walk the length of the driveway plus the length of the garage (200+') and not slow down.

The CUT had loaded R4s and a cab with an estimated weight of about 2600-2700 lb. The GT had loaded turfs, chains, and a 250 lb, 5' back blade with an estimated weight of 2250 lb. My SCUT, with loaded turfs and a 5' unweighted back blade, weighs somewhere between them.
 

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I do agree that a lot of weight on the rear of a small tractor is very helpful using R4 since my blade is out in front it takes a lot of weight off the rear tired and therefore most of the traction.

I think I would struggle greatly without the weight on the rear. Larger and heavier tractors may not have this problem
 

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I do agree that a lot of weight on the rear of a small tractor is very helpful using R4 since my blade is out in front it takes a lot of weight off the rear tired and therefore most of the traction.

I think I would struggle greatly without the weight on the rear. Larger and heavier tractors may not have this problem
I have to agree with you and the R4's. I also have a lot hanging weight on the back of my JD 2305 with the backhoe. I also have Rimguard in the back tires for additional weight. I have never had any real issues moving the snow with this combination but I can see real issues if I had not loaded the tires and having the back hoe on the back. I do use the front end loader for moving the snow but we rarely get much snow and a plow or snowblower likely would be better for this setup. I am thinking of going to the dealer and seeing if they have a plow setup that would mate to the front end loader for just the snow we get. It would likely be just a light duty plow for just snow.

Prof100 has made the decision to use turfs and it is what ever does the best for his application and I agree that for his setup the turf tires likely will work just great for him. I also do not mow much with my 2305 as I bought a X590 for the principle reason that the weight I already have on my 2305 even removing the front end loader and backhoe I have got my 2305 stuck in the yard in the spring even with the R4's. I got it stuck so good that I had to get the neighbor to come over with his track hoe to pull me out. I would also suggest that he not put Rimguard in the wheels but to use wheel weights and ballast on the 3 point so that when he is mowing he can remove the addition weight. My setup works fine for what I want and is all I need.
 

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I think a lot of it has to do with the environment you are in. If you have a paved driveway and any slop, you will most likely have issues. I had an older White GT-1855 with loaded rear turf tires and chains and it would plow through anything. I'm talking snow drifts that were up to my head while sitting on the tractor and it would go through it like a tank. I moved and had a paved road and a hill and it was the most worthless thing. I couldn't push 2 inches of snow. I moved again to a gravel level driveway and it's a tank once again!

I have also seen good and bad stories about the R4's. Some love them and some hate them. I think it has to do with your environment! I went with the R4's on my 1025r, but was and still curious on the R3's! I think we see R4's alot over the turf is because of the load and sidewall ratings and having the loader and backhoe. The R4 is a better tire in that way. I haven't had a chance to try my 1025r with any snow, but I would assume I wouldn't have any issues with a flat gravel environment.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I think a lot of it has to do with the environment you are in. If you have a paved driveway and any slop, you will most likely have issues. I had an older White GT-1855 with loaded rear turf tires and chains and it would plow through anything. I'm talking snow drifts that were up to my head while sitting on the tractor and it would go through it like a tank. I moved and had a paved road and a hill and it was the most worthless thing. I couldn't push 2 inches of snow. I moved again to a gravel level driveway and it's a tank once again!

I have also seen good and bad stories about the R4's. Some love them and some hate them. I think it has to do with your environment! I went with the R4's on my 1025r, but was and still curious on the R3's! I think we see R4's alot over the turf is because of the load and sidewall ratings and having the loader and backhoe. The R4 is a better tire in that way. I haven't had a chance to try my 1025r with any snow, but I would assume I wouldn't have any issues with a flat gravel environment.

Thanks, I went with turfs. My biggest usage will be mowing my three acres.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Thanks, I went with turfs. My biggest usage will be mowing my three acres.
9 month update—1st year of ownership
Just a follow up report on running the turf tires since February. I found they worked well removing snow and through the spring, summer and fall. Only drawback is cleaning the mud out of the treads. An electric 1750 psi pressure washer does the cleaning job.
 

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I have 2 sets of tires for my 2305. R4 for serious utility work (backhoe, or loader), and Multitrac-CS tires (not plain turf tires, but similar) for summer mowing and all other work.
I have no problem with pushing snow using R4's and no chains. Rear tires are loaded. Other than the loader on the front, no other weight on the tractor. My son uses this setup to clear 5 driveways this way, during the winter. But they are mostly flat.

Keep in mind that if you angle the loader to get the snow off the driveway, down to the pavement, the R4s then run on that clean part of the pavement and grip well. If you leave a 1" thick skim coat on the driveway (ie bucket on float, and angled up a bit), as you then run over it, the snow will ice up and them you're toast. Some people angle their bucket that way to prevent scratching their driveway with the bucket edge. However, chains will cause the same or more damage so it's a coin toss.

A turf tire, or multitac-cs tire has more biting edges (just like car-winter-tires do), so it would outperform R4, until the treads cake up with snow, and the tires can't dig down through the snow to the pavement below (ie floating on the snow). In that case, the turf tire will not clear the snow to dig down to the solid base, whereas the R4 will with it's tread pattern (somewhat resembling an ag tire tread) will. Weight is very important here.

Having said all that, I have never done a direct comparison test. All I know is that I use my R4s in the winter and have no problems.

cheers!
 

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I've been using multitrac-cs for about 40 years and have never seen them with the snow packed in the treads. But it is a bit colder up here than where you are and the snow is mostly dry.

My neighbor has a Kubota B2920 CUT/loader with loaded R4s and a cab, and it was painful watching that poor tractor wrestle with 18" of snow that my MF GC SCUT/loader would walk through with loaded tires while also pulling a 5' back blade. Now he has a 500 lb, 54" blower on the back and it performs much better.

It's pretty hard to find a better hardpacked snow/ice tire for traction than the multitrac-cs. Last winter my GC carried heaping buckets of the compacted snow and ice that avalanched off of the house roof up the 20° slope to the top of my 7' snow pile with no trouble.
 

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How dare you speak of your experience and cause my curiosity to try my multitrac tires on the 2305 this winter just to see if they are in fact better!!??....

Kidding!! :tango_face_wink:

OK - but that means I have to swap the R4s off again, since I put them on already to do some TLB work..... and those rear tires are not that light to handle all loaded up with fluid..... ugh!
 

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How dare you speak of your experience and cause my curiosity to try my multitrac tires on the 2305 this winter just to see if they are in fact better!!??....

Kidding!! :tango_face_wink:

OK - but that means I have to swap the R4s off again, since I put them on already to do some TLB work..... and those rear tires are not that light to handle all loaded up with fluid..... ugh!
:sidelaugh:sidelaugh

Sorry 'bout that!

I figured out a few years ago that it was easier to parallel park the wheels against the hub than it was to lift them. The Rim guard loaded tires weigh 178 lb, but the calcium loaded tires that I had on my GT (same size) weighed 215 lb with the chains on. Now that was a struggle the first time that I installed them, and I was in a lot better shape 38 years ago!
 

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:sidelaugh:sidelaugh

Sorry 'bout that!

I figured out a few years ago that it was easier to parallel park the wheels against the hub than it was to lift them. The Rim guard loaded tires weigh 178 lb, but the calcium loaded tires that I had on my GT (same size) weighed 215 lb with the chains on. Now that was a struggle the first time that I installed them, and I was in a lot better shape 38 years ago!
yea - i do that parallel park thing with the wheels as well. Problem is when the holes dont line up, and you need to twist the wheel on the spot, by 1/2" for example... just tweaking it and fighting it to get it just-aligned, is still a PITA. For some reason I always end up breaking a sweat doing it - even when it's 0 degC. outside!
 

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Shift to neutral and use a round pry bar through the bolt hole to turn the hub.

Works good for the first tire. Not so much for the second unless you can get the first tire off of the floor. Back hoe stabilizers work real good for that.
 

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oh yea - normally I do the tires before I install the BH.... and use a jack for the tractor. ya - bar through the bolt hole and many other methods that work - all require extra effort compared to if the wheel was empty and light.
it's not the end of the world - and takes 30 seconds longer to line things up... but those precious 30 seconds I could be sipping on a cold-one - but instead I have to wrestle with a wheel.....
 

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I've been using multitrac-cs for about 40 years and have never seen them with the snow packed in the treads. But it is a bit colder up here than where you are and the snow is mostly dry.

My neighbor has a Kubota B2920 CUT/loader with loaded R4s and a cab, and it was painful watching that poor tractor wrestle with 18" of snow that my MF GC SCUT/loader would walk through with loaded tires while also pulling a 5' back blade. Now he has a 500 lb, 54" blower on the back and it performs much better.

It's pretty hard to find a better hardpacked snow/ice tire for traction than the multitrac-cs. Last winter my GC carried heaping buckets of the compacted snow and ice that avalanched off of the house roof up the 20° slope to the top of my 7' snow pile with no trouble.
I just sold a tractor with R4s on it and will second the fact that they are not great in snow without at least 500lb of rear ballast.
 

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neat idea... only thing is getting the wheel onto the cart takes the same effort as aligning it manually during installation.....
unless you have to align them twice because something went wrong - in which case the cart wins - due to a singular loading-effort expenditure.
 

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very interesting....
i wonder if they would ever come up with a Blizzak for CUTs... that would be something!!
 

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Carlisle just came out with looks cross between R4s and turf tires. Might be something to look into. View attachment 2467586
These tires are not new and have been out since December of last year. They're known as Versaturfs. I had them put on my new 1023e 4 months ago and have put 60 hours on them, mostly with a grapple or FEL. Unlike bar type tires they don't lose traction when backing regardless of soil type. They're probably the best tire I have ever had on a tractor going back to the 60's. JD still wasn't offering them the last I heard, but your dealer can certainly get them for you at a dealer or other source.

2468141
2468142
 
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