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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a Bunton B36 with the Onan 125 engine that was said to have been only a residential machine. It looks clean enough for that to be true. Any site with manuals for this model. I know that it's fairly similar to many B36 machines, but parts info for this specific model would be great.

I'd like to add electric start as well. Pull starting is strenuous, to say the least.

2501352
2501353
 

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One of my Owner manual scans might be what you're looking for.

John Deere bought and badged 32, 36, 48 & 52" mowers from Bunton in the 1980's as TY series walk behind mowers. I ran a few 48" & 52", TY series, John Deere (Bunton) walk behind mowers for a commercial lawn care company when I was in college. The CV drive section looked just like yours.

Bunton is gone, gobbled up by Ransomes Bobcat. John Deere is still in business but you'll need to do your own leg work. Don't expect a lot of help from the parts counter man at Deere til you figure out what Deere called your model mower.

If it's difficult to pull start there are three things to look at.
Compression, Fuel delivery, and Ignition.
Since it starts it has ignition
You probably don't see a bunch of smoke indicating engine wear and decent compression means you get a mild workout pulling it over.
You likely need to give the carburetor some attention by stripping it down and giving the whole mess a bath in an ultrasonic hot tank. It's amazing how much of a difference in starting and runability cleaning & adjusting the carb properly will make.


I have several ONAN, Kohler, and Kawasaki service manuals in my Bunton service stash. Scanning all of them is a pretty large undertaking. Individual manuals aren't that many pages. If you'd post your engine info I'll take a look and see if what I have covers your engine.

I would be careful about storing that machine outdoors. The CVT pulley sheaves tend to rust and bind up when they get wet.
Also. Be sure to keep the differential box filled with the proper gear oil. If you blow that out I'm not sure you can replace it.
 

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This would be the vintage of John Deere Service manual you're looking to purchase.

This would be the parts book for that same model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
2501735
Thanks for the info. It usually starts on the first pull, but I found that the main wire harness connection got wet and has started to fall apart which is an intermittent problem.I have a tarp over it. It will be stored inside.
 

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Those are unsealed Delphi Packard 56 connectors. In the Packard 56 & 59 connector family the gender reference is the terminal itself, not the plastic shell.
Sealed connectors like Weatherpak and Metripak and Deutsch DT were fairly new in the 1980's and likely cost a bunch more than the technology of the 1950's... unsealed Packard connectors.
I'd hit the terminals with Deoxit D5 spray. It'll leave a non conductive dielectric oil behind to protect them from the weather.

It looks like you need some new Male connector shells. If you want to keep it original you can extract and move the terminals over to a new set of Packard 56 shells.
Usually the Female shells hold up better to UV exposure than the male shells. If the plastic of the Female shells are breaking down you may need to replace them as well.

Here are the Delphi (Aptiv now that GM sold Delphi off) part numbers for the Packard 56 connector shells;
-Delphi Packard 56 series 2984528 Black Single Terminal Unsealed For Male Terminals
-Delphi Packard 56 series 2977253 Black Single Terminal Unsealed For Female Terminals
-Delphi Packard 56 series 2977042 Natural Six Terminal Unsealed For Male Terminals
-Delphi Packard 56 series 2977044 Black Six Terminal Unsealed For Female Terminals

Mouser Electronics and The Electrical Depot carry these parts for around $0.50-$4 each. I pay around $8 for ground shipping for a small Mouser order like this so factor that in.
-Amazon lists them but you'll pay a very very dear seller premium for the free expedited shipping using Jeff Bezos platform to purchase them. 2977042 is $20 on Amazon & 2984528 is $9.95 with "free shipping" (almost $30)
VS Mouser
-$1.12 + $0.52 + @ $8 shipping (Just under $10) from Mouser for those two Male shells with shipping. The Female shells are $1.02 & $0.26 so under $2 for both making the order under $12 for all four shells.
I'll wait a couple days to save $18.

Packard 56 Male terminals are kinda miserable to release from the shells. I usually use a pair of needle nose pliers to jockey the bent arm into the slot in the connector and push them through. Your shells have mostly dissolved so that's not a big issue.
I'd just move the male connectors that are not contained anymore and insert them in the new shell, one at a time, then cut what's left of the male shell away from the terminals that are still inside it, one at a time, and slip them into the new connector shell.

The Female terminals have a rectangular hole with a square recess on a long edge to push the 12094430 extractor into. The $10 Delphi 12094430 tool is a short step away from a #0 precision screwdriver for a lot more money and you can't remove small panel screws with it.
I use an Excelite #0 flat blade precision screwdriver to depress the latching tab on the terminal and then carefully pull the terminal from the shell. The tab usually needs to be lifted back up with a case knife or razor blade knife so it stands up from the terminal itself to latch into the new connector shell. The tab gets mashed by the correct extraction tool too so there's no magic in it.

The only way I know the rough age of your machine is that I worked with them in the mid to late 1980's.
The 1960's & 1970's machines are very similar to yours but they had a more skeletal operator arrangement with rounded handlebars, a similar metal fuel tank, and CVT transmission.
This is a 1970's Bunton 52" commercial walk behind mower that's lived a bit of a rough life. You can see the familial resemblance to your machine.
2501804

They updated the 1970's machine with beautified covers and straight handlebars in the 1980's. Your machine and the John Deere TY series are this generation.

The very late 1980's and very early 1990's machines moved away from the CVT belt and sheave pulley transmissions to Peerless 4-6 speed gearboxes and they used HDPE fuel tanks. This is the series my BG52 walk behind falls into. --> Bunton BG52 Commercial Walk Behind Mower
Mine has had a bit of a rough life too.

By the mid 1990's they were using Hydro drives on the wheels instead of belts. These machines are expensive to repair.
Then Bobcat gobbled them up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks. I am ordering some from Mouser today. It reminds of the time my Ford wagon suddenly cut out on the way to Toronto, just past Niagara Falls on a dark and cold winter night. I popped the hood and pulled on a similar connector that energized the ignition and a wire came out. It was a quick fix, but it shows the vulnerability of this type of connector.

I imagine the year info is contained in the serial number.
 

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They were patented by Packard, yes that Packard, in 1956.
It took the automotive world til the mid 1990's to move to mostly sealed connectors. Commercial equipment and transit still uses Molex Mate-n-Loc, unsealed Metripak connectors, and Packard 56 & Packard 59 connectors with the associated weather problems.

I had no end of electrical issues with a $28,000 man lift around 2000. I was forever getting it fixed at the dealership while it was still under warranty. As soon as it was no longer under warranty I changed all the unsealed connectors over to Weatherpak, Deutsch DT, and sealed Metripak. I replaced several brittle PVC wires on the engine to the less thermally sensitive SXL jacketed wire as well. And I sprayed down all the open stud and ring terminal connections with Wurth HHS. No more gremlins.

The engineers and bean counters at these outfits need to step forward a few decades. Weatherpak, Metripak, Deutsch DT, and Crosslink Polyethylene jacketed wire are the technology of the 1970's. This unsealed stuff is the tech of the 1930's-1950's.

It's pricy but there's nothing like it for sealing open electrical connections from the weather.
 

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Thanks for posting those names for connector types. That helps with finding replacement connectors, as if the equipment manufacturer decides to not make them available, it's not easy to find the connectors without knowing the names of them (or knowing someone who knows connectors)...
 

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It is darn helpful to be able to ID connector families. Once you know what they are you can usually find someone that's selling the parts.
I worked on public transit and heavy machinery electronics for 35 years and I've worked on antique vehicles and farm machinery for close to 50 years.

Mike Rowand put together a pretty decent list of automotive type terminals and connectors used by North American manufacturers.
The Europeans and Asians use other families Toyota seemed to like Deutsch connectors at least on my 1985 Supra. Datsun and Nissan liked those in the 80's too.
 
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