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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,878 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The hydraulic pump and cooler are bolted back on.
The inlet port on the filter is threaded for a 1 inch pipe thread so I went ahead and ran a large inlet hose from the right side of the loader frame to the filter.




The pressure line from the pump is run up to a fitting that is bolted onto the inside corner of the left upright post for the FEL.
From there, it crosses over to the inlet port on the hydraulic valve.




On the drivers side. a hydraulic pressure gauge is attached to the fitting that is bolted in the corner.




The return line from the valve runs down the right upright post ...



... in along the frame and up to the fitting on the oil cooler.
The line attached to the other fitting of the oil cooler is then run down under the engine and back into the left side of the loader frame.
This way, the fluid has to circulate thru the left side, thru the crossover hose at the back and then up the right side before it is drawn into the pump once again.




These two lines run down the right upright post and will go back to the lift cylinder on the 3-point hitch.





Now .. I'm still not totally satisfied with my exhaust design !
There are three hydraulic lines running along the right side of the frame that are close to the exhaust.
I made up an aluminum heat deflector but I'm not sure it will be enough.






I'm thinking that I may have to revert back to my original design of two small mufflers.
One coming off the side of each head.

Or .. I may just have to give into peer pressure and turn the exhaust up where it is and run a stack muffler ?

I'll make a decision on the exhaust after the front loader and cylinders are mounted.
They are going to have to be on in order for me to see what kind of clearance there is.
 

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Retired Super Moderator - Deceased September 2015
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26,679 Posts
Leave like it is but change the Rubber covered hydraulic hoses to outside stainless braided hydraulic hoses. Would look sharp IMO:thThumbsU
 

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Silent, Senior MTF Member
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871 Posts
If you have at least a half inch clearance, I believe I'd give it a try, and see how hot it gets. That is, a half inch between your shield and the exhaust pipe.
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,878 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If you have at least a half inch clearance, I believe I'd give it a try, and see how hot it gets. That is, a half inch between your shield and the exhaust pipe.
That clearance is no problem.
There is about 1-1/2 inch between the exhaust and the shield and about 1/2 inch between the shield and the hose.
I use aluminum because it really dissipates the heat well.
I've used it for exhaust shields before and have been pleased with just how much difference it makes.

The exhaust goes down and turns under the loader frame and there is only about 1 inch clearance in that area.
The hydraulic fluid is constantly flowing past that point, into the pump and up thru the cooler all the time.
I don't know how much the exhaust heat on that point of the loader frame will effect the temperature of the hydraulic fluid before it goes into the pump.

I can plumb hydraulic lines OK but that is the extent of my hydraulic knowledge.

I'm going to make another aluminum shield to wrap under the loader frame.
It will have 1/2 to 3/4 inch clearance between the exhaust and the shield.
That would put 1/2 to 1/4 inch clearance between the shield and the loader frame.
 

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Sears Fan
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1,281 Posts
I know it would be tricky, but instead of doing a revamp on the muffler, which seems fine, couldn't you run a length of steel hydraulic line down where it gets close to the muffler?

Then, with a heat shield on it, I would think it would be fine.
 

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Red Tractor Fan
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1,704 Posts
If you can get your hands on some of that header heat tape and place some on the shield, it would solve the problem. The other thing you could do is to section out the lines, replace the ends, and run a pair of steel lines past the exhaust.

Also, for what it's worth.... ditch the shield at the hose, and make one that is longer and on the pipe. The pipe shield will work better and remove more heat. I would make two metal "riser blocks" that are threaded and weld them to the pipe. If the top was curved, and threaded, you could just bolt the heat shield to the pipe about a 1/4" off the pipe. :fing32:
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,878 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A day's work completed ..
The lines are run to the cylinder on the 3-point.



The loader arms, bucket and cylinders are all mounted and the hydraulic lines are run to the loader arm cylinders.
Left side cylinder.




Right side cylinder.




I've got a bunch of miscellaneous hydraulic hoses ( some new and some used ) that I'm trying to use as much as possible.
The fittings on the hydraulic valve are for 1/4 inch hose and the fittings on the cylinders are for 3/8 inch hose.
Here's the lines running down the right upright post.
You can see the adapters to go from one 1/4 to 3/8 hose.




This is the "rats nest" under the right side where the hoses "T" off to run out to both cylinders.




A view of this area from underneath the tractor.




In the process of running these hydraulic lines today, there is one thing that became very clear.
.... The exhaust under the tractor has to go ! ....

I think the best ( and easiest ) solution is to cut the down pipe, turn it 90 degrees and put a stack muffler on it.
 

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102 Posts
What about using header wrap? It works very well at keeping the heat inside the headers on cars. It allso has the plus of a little HP improvement.
 

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Super Moderator
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32,213 Posts
The problem with header wrap is it would hold any water it gets soaked with right on the pipes. Works fine for a race car on a header under the hood, but with something thats going to get wet, and dirty, and spend a lot of time just sitting...I would think the pipes would have a short life. My bad eyes cant realy see how close all this falls together except for that big suction hose. That one I would cut out a section and insert a peice of tube right there near the pipe. In time that big rubber hose will move around, and expand, warp etc like all hoses do. I would be afread it would move closer. A tube attached somewere, with a sheld would realy fix that up well, and would be stable.
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,878 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Once I started running the hydraulic lines with the "T" fittings and all the lines too and from them, the muffler turned out to be in the way.
When I placed the muffler under the tractor, I thought there would still be enough room for the lines but there isn't.

So, with my concern about the closeness of the exhaust down pipe to everything and now the muffler actually being in the way, changing the location of the exhaust is my best option.

Like I've said all along, this is not pre-designed with all the problems worked out on paper before it's built.
If a part that I built doesn't work out later, then I just change it so it does work.
 

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Sears Fan
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1,281 Posts
Actually, I think this tractor would look neat with a stack. Go for it! It should look a little more like a tractor, since most of the larger ones have stacks ;) Just don't forget the flapper!
 

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490 Posts
Now .. I'm still not totally satisfied with my exhaust design !
There are three hydraulic lines running along the right side of the frame that are close to the exhaust.
I made up an aluminum heat deflector but I'm not sure it will be enough.


The best set up for the exhaust pipes would be to have them ceramic coated like the Jet Hot stuff. Header wrap will rot the pipes. I ruined a set of headers on my racecar that way. The Jet Hot stuff works great plus it looks cool.
 

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502 Posts
I was wondering what kind of hydraulic valve that is and what type of hydraulic pump you would need for a tractor that size.
I know that sounds stupied but I don't know much about hydraulics.

thanks
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,878 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I was wondering what kind of hydraulic valve that is and what type of hydraulic pump you would need for a tractor that size.
I know that sounds stupied but I don't know much about hydraulics.
thanks
Don't feel bad, I don't know much about hydraulics either.
I can run the lines OK but that is about the extent of my knowledge.

I picked the pump up at a swapmeet but I do not know what the flow rate is on it.
It has a 3/4 NPT inlet and a 1/2 NPT outlet.
I've used pumps this size on other projects and they have worked out well.

The hydraulic valve is rather unique.
It is made in Italy and is designed for use on small airplanes.
The first lever applies pressure up or down and it is spring loaded to return to center.
This will hold the cylinder at whatever position you have moved it like a regular valve.

On the next two levers, you can apply pressure up or down and they will return to center and hold the cylinder in position.
You can also push the levers past the down pressure point and the lever will lock in place to allow the cylinder to float.

I picked up five of these valves on a package deal.
Four of them are like this one with 1 pressure only lever and 2 float levers.
The 5th valve has a float position on all three levers.

I put that 5th valve on my Toro to operate the mover deck.
The deck has two wings that raise up and down by hydraulic.
I use the center lever for raising the whole deck and the other two levers for operating the wings.

There is also a port for "pressure beyond" right above the outlet port that the tank return line is hooked to.
If I remove the cap from the "pressure beyond" port and put it on the tank outlet port, then I could hook another valve to this valve and have pressure go to it.
The tank returne line would then go on the end of the second valve.
 

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Lindeman crawler fan
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2,878 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The rest of the hydraulic lines are run for bucket cylinders.




Control levers are made for the valve.




I cut the exhaust and turned it 90 degrees so it is pointed straight up now.



 

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Premium Member
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2,568 Posts
Ray,
I wondered about your exhaust before. I know that on the 8N Fords when they had a loader that was used a lot, the exhaust system really took a beating. I thought yours would be the same with it underneath the tractor.
Dave
P.S. I like stacks.
 
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