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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I have to bleed brakes, my helpers are me, myself and I.
1. One tip I heard from a guy on the radio is to use teflon thread sealing tape on the threads of the bleeder screws. Wrap it around the bleeder about 1.5 to 2 times and install bleeder. That way there is less chance of air getting past the threads and sucked back into the system.
2. Get 2 or 3 different sizes of clear vinyl hose at least 5 feet long of each at a hardware store. Not all bleeders have the same size nipple.
3. Get a glass jar at least 1 quart if not 1/2 gallon and put some used brake fluid in there.
4. Use a chair or stool or something that sits up higher than the wheel cylinder or caliper you are bleeding.
5. Slowly crack open the bleeder screw so there is less chance you will break its head off. Maybe put a cheater pipe or large wrench over the wrench you are using so its easier to slowly carefully open it up. Open bleeder about 1/8th turn. Put hose on bleeder and run the end of the hose into the jar. Put the jar on the stool or chair above the height of the caliper or wheel cylinder you are bleeding. The act of making the bled fluid climb as it leaves the wheel cylinder makes it much harder for air to get into the system as you are bleeding it.
 

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Or, maybe you could get the 20 year old upstairs neighbor to help you. Then you could share a pizza afterward. :fing32:
 

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The best solution I've found is a hand held vacuum pump similar to this http://tinyurl.com/ydsa5we .I've used mine a couple of times after I've replaced a front caliper on my truck as well as changing the fluid on my bike.
A tip, put a stick on the brake pedal and push it part way down and jamb it against the seat or steering wheel. It'll stop you losing all you fluid as the ports will be covered.....Mike
 

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The best solution I've found is a hand held vacuum pump similar to this http://tinyurl.com/ydsa5we .I've used mine a couple of times after I've replaced a front caliper on my truck as well as changing the fluid on my bike.
A tip, put a stick on the brake pedal and push it part way down and jamb it against the seat or steering wheel. It'll stop you losing all you fluid as the ports will be covered.....Mike



yes this is what i use also
 

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Has anyone seen ChimChim?
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Mightyvac... They sell them at Harbor Freight for under $40.00 and it is a versatile tool that can help you trouble shoot all sorts of vacuum issues, and help you properly bleed ABS brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I tried a Mighty Vac about 5 years ago. The one I got was worthless. I couldn't get it to do anything usefull. I think I threw it away. There is a company that makes power bleeders. It produces air pressure into the master cylinder with a custom made cap made to fit the MC on the vehicle your working on. Only problem with one of them is you would have to stop often, pull off the cap, add brake fluid and put the cap back on.
 

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I made a vacuum bleeder from a glass mayonaise jar with a steel lid...
You poke two holes in the lid,and solder in two peices of brake line tube,one 1/4" one about an inch long,the other one of 3/16",that goes almost all the way to the bottom..

To use it,you attatch two lengths of hose to the two "nipples" on the lid--the 1/4" one will go to a vacuum port on your engine that has manifold vaccum..a pair of vise grips or an on-off valve can be used to regulate the vacuum..

The 3/16" nipple gets a length of 3/16" clear vinyl hose,long enough to reach to all 4 wheels..this hose is slipped over the bleeder screw,if need be a clippy wooden clothespin can be used to help it stay on..(I find by heating the tubing up with a lighter it usually slips right on and stays put very nicely!)..

All you do is put enough brake fluid in the jar to cover the 3/16" line,an inch or so is plenty,then start your engine,open the bleeder screw,and open the valve or release the vise grips to let the vaccum into the jar--since the 1/4" line is way up near the top,the vaccum will pull the brake fluid out of the bleeder and fill the jar,and you'll be able to easily see when there is no more bubbles--tighten the bleeder screw,and shut the vacuum off,its bled perfect...

I read this trick in an old hot rod magazine about 30 years ago..beats the **** out of trying to bleed brakes alone with old methods or "one man bleeders"..it can be done on the road alone in an emergency if you have hose with you too..

Teflon tape might help the bleeder screw from rusting into place,but I dont recall ever having one sloppy enough to let air back in by its threads...95% of all bleeder screws I have had snap off did so because they had no rubber cap over them,and water got in them and rusted the tapered seat solid..(either that or they litteraly dissolved from road salt!)..I've "greased" a few bleeder screws when I lacked any rubber caps to put on them and it seemed to work well--RTV would probably work too,but might prove difficult to remove "next time"..I always put never-seize on the threads too..

One time I tried bleeding my brakes alone,but my one man bleeder thing had rusted up inside and failed to work...in desparation I looked for another "check valve" to use,I had used one off a car engine once from a 70's AMC that had one in the vaccum advance hose,but it didn't work that day either,I think brake fluid ruined the rubber diaphram in it..I called a friend to see if he could come over and pump the pedal,but he was busy--he told me to look for a pump sprayer bottle like "409" comes in,the pump tube that goes into the bottle has a spring loaded check ball valve in it--I found one and it worked perfectly,just like my "one man bleeder" did!..
 

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i just level the vehicle and open the bleeder with no pressure on the pedal. gravity will take over!!! it may not be as fast as some of the fancy expensive tools that you all are talking about, but that gives me time to clean up all the other tools that was used to cause the lines to be bled.
 

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i just level the vehicle and open the bleeder with no pressure on the pedal. gravity will take over!!! it may not be as fast as some of the fancy expensive tools that you all are talking about, but that gives me time to clean up all the other tools that was used to cause the lines to be bled.


yes i have done this myself also ...But the brakes always feel a little spongy because you never get all the air out by doing this ..Yes the vac pump can be a pain in the buns ..i modified mine ..But nothing beats having an extra person around to help
 
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