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Shop = My Therapy
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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Brinly plow that I bought that has been sitting outside for years. What is the best way to shine up the bottom so that when I go to plow with it this fall it rolls dirt good. I am going to wire wheel and re-paint the plow frame, but need to make the bottom shine.

Wire Wheel?
Sandpaper? Start medium and go to really fine?

Anyone have any experience with this?

Thanks in advance!

Brinly Plow right.JPG
 

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Shop = My Therapy
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Discussion Starter #4
It is really rusty. I think will take a lot longer than that. That would be good to finish off the shine, but I think it would make life a lot easier to get it most of the way first. I grew up on a dairy farm and have plowed a lot of acres in my life. I haven't plowed much with rusty bottoms before but what I did - it was a nightmare. My dad was nuts about oiling them down or spraying them with plow paint when we put the plow away.
 

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Shop = My Therapy
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Discussion Starter #5
No decoration. I want it to work good.
 

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I would wire wheel off as much rust as possible then use it.
 

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Once when I was about 16 my dad had me scour a rusted 5-bottom with steel wool & sand paper. If I remember right that was on one of those Sunday mornings after I rolled into the yard at about sunrise. Don't know if it was the steel wool or the sand paper but one of them sure left me with a bad headache! :thSick:
 

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Dirt

You can hit it with a wire wheel first if you want, but I have seen some plows that looked beyond useable shine up after about 3 passes.
 

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One time of polishing a three bottom plow up with a few old soft red bricks and I never again neglected to smear grease on them at the end of the season.

I'd wire wheel it because, as esnb 74 said, they can be a bugger to use till they do shine up. Won't take long in some soils but in clay or heavy loam it takes quite awhile.

Mike
 

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the "AWOL member"
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Sandpaper and elbow grease was how I used to have to do it.I'm guessing being the only male child was my qualification to being assigned plow cleaning duty every spring just don't remember my sisters being in on the fun!
 

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A sanding disc on an angle grinder, the coarser the grit the better, will do the rough work 10X faster than wire wheel. Once you get to where you can see bare metal put it the ground and use it a little. If there are places that soil sticks to give them a little more work with the grinder.
 

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I agree with Alan. A flex disk on an angle grinder to get the worst of the rust off. Then a wet sand paper and some kerosene to help start the shine Wear protective gloves. That worked for me 4 years ago on my first Brinly plow.
Dave
 

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We never did anything special. The plows sat out and got rusty. They got a shine on real quick when we starteed using them.
 

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I have had really good luck with using Boiled Linseed Oil to give a new shine to used metal parts. Just sand the metal down and then rub some BOL on it. The BOL will need to set up for at least a day, and once dry it will leave a dry oil film over the metal that protects it from the elements.

I use this stuff on all of my metal garden tools at the end of season to protect them from rusting during the winter.
 
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