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Discussion Starter #1
Today a helper and I installed a 36" steel insulated walk in door in a new pole barn horse stable. It's all level, shimmed, plumb, hinge side against a 6x6 post inside and I boxed it in top & other side 2x6s.
I used two tubes caulking, before and after set. It works great but what's the best way to seat the top since steel panel is corrugated?
Pictures I just took, I'm on upper level with flashlight. I thought about Great Stuff, but that's not for that I don't think. Maybe strips of pressure treated wood in place between then caulk?
Also door had two sticky backed pads about 2"x3"x1/4"...spongy like weatherstrip. No instructions with it.
Thanks...


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Discussion Starter #2
Spellchecker goofed..."best way to seat the top" should be best way to SEAL

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Expanding foam insulation then caulk over that? If it's exposed to UV at all, the urethane foam insulation will very quickly degrade (quickly as in a couple weeks).
I've not had that problem sealing the roof edges (corrugated roofing to corrugated metal sides) with the expanding foam in a can of my work shed here in northern Florida. It hardens overnight and eventually over time turns a very hard brown. Paint over it with an oil based paint.
For Sevenhills1952, I'd suggest making hardwood pieces to fill the gaps to an even level, then a clear silicone caulk to seal it all up and provide water runoff.
 

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^^^This. If the siding's not down too tight you might be able to work something in.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'm sure flashing should have been installed first...but now it's shoulda coulda woulda. I've never installed a door before.
I did cut panel to match other side with raised rib so it matched. The company who built it wanted $480 for a flat steel door, labor I'm guessing another $200-$300 at least. This Lowe's house door was $179.
Above it about a foot is a soffit with gutter, so it's fairly protected.
I think if I cut treated strips to drive in and caulk it will be fine.

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That house door has cheap wood brick mold on it. If not protected it will not last long. On reason to remove the door just take the brick molding of and trim the opening with metal and put vynal brick mold back on and seal it up.
 

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Sevenhills,

They make a metal brick mold cover that will take care of exposing wood.

If you cam pull the siding loose enough to slip in J Channel, big win.

Run your J Channel up both sides to the top of the door, top piece extends over side pieces, cut top piece at the bottom of the "J" and bend down. Water runs downhill!

It appears though that it is nailed on per "nails on the ribs, screws in the flats" rule of thumb.

CCMoe
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Few more pictures, but it's getting dark. I cut the opening piece so both sides were on a ridge, then caulked. I wasn't thinking about the outside top, which is under an overhang 2-3ft. I don't know if I could take 1/4" screws out enough to get something behind it? I can't picture what it would be and I don't have a metal brake.
I want it to work...but is is a barn!


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Sevenhills,

You're in luck if it's screwed on which it looks like it is.

It also appears that there is a single panel above the door, you may be able to remove the entire panel and put it back in place once you have installed the J channel.

By the way, you can buy the metal J channel at most lumber yards, possible Lowe's, Menards or the Home Depot.

The J channel may come in different widths, depths, 1/2" or 3/4" or possible 1", ask the salesman which works best with metal siding.

I would also add another 2X board above your door on the inside to give you something to attach the J channel to as it may be higher than existing board.

I would also suggest wearing leather or cut proof gloves, the metal can be very sharp.

J Channel


Brick Molding


Looking at the J channel, you may need to add boards to the sides also and possibly two above the door for nailing purposes.

Pick up a couple pounds of galvanized roofing nails, 1 1/2" also.

It's doable, brick molding first and the J channel.

CCMoe
 

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That door should have a header anyhow, sooner or later the top of the casing is gonna sag.
 

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You're in luck if it's screwed on which it looks like it is.

It also appears that there is a single panel above the door, you may be able to remove the entire panel and put it back in place once you have installed the J channel.
I see a single panel also, one overlap at the left jamb and the other one rib in from the right jamb. The nails on the ribs will make it harder to pull that panel though. It's probably easier to pull the whole door out and add the J-Channel, then reinstall the door.

Roofing supply places have special foam gaskets called 'outside closures' that will fit to the panel profile and some Big Box stores stock them. Using one of those behind the brick mold would be a start, then add some caulking and aluminum flashing, but that would be a hack job and wouldn't end up looking right.

Pulling the door will be easier overall and the headers can be added as well.
 

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He only need to pull the brick mold. There is no reason to pull the door. Take care of it now or replace the door later. Just a hint here the less sealant used the better. Some think its a hole filler and fill big gaps with it. Then later wonder why it fails. The width should never be more than a 1/4 of the depth.
 

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Six one way, half a dozen the other.

Just laying out options...............

CCMoe
 
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