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As you have the CB65 like me, you can also put the transport pins in the stablizers arms to keep them from falling.
I put all the transport pins in so nothing moves until I want it to.
Ahh. Sorry. Didn't know about the transport pins. My older model 2375 doesn't have such a thing for the stabilizers, only for the boom.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
No transport pins on my BH either.
I use a cam strap or a rubber bungee.
 

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A Proud MF'er
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Just ordered my 10" pneumatic wheels for the CB05 BH dolly. I took the backhoe off for the second time yesterday and took the time to see how high I could get the base off the ground with the stabilizers, and saw 16" as the limit. My dolly will have a floor about 13" off the ground, so it should work - that way at least.

I'm not sure how quickly I will build it, but the wheels were on sale. Taking the BH off onto some blocks on the ground is not exactly a smooth solution, so depending on the on-off cycle, I think sooner than later is the answer.
 

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Just ordered my 10" pneumatic wheels for the CB05 BH dolly. I took the backhoe off for the second time yesterday and took the time to see how high I could get the base off the ground with the stabilizers, and saw 16" as the limit. My dolly will have a floor about 13" off the ground, so it should work - that way at least.

I'm not sure how quickly I will build it, but the wheels were on sale. Taking the BH off onto some blocks on the ground is not exactly a smooth solution, so depending on the on-off cycle, I think sooner than later is the answer.
Good luck! You'll do fine. Just let the machine dictate and take what it gives you.
 

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A Proud MF'er
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Good luck! You'll do fine. Just let the machine dictate and take what it gives you.
Like any designer, I want to understand all the limits and forces at work in placing and removing the BH on/off the dolly. Higher CoG and moving over wash-rock gravel add two wild-card limit/force variables that I can only truly know in practice, so it may take more than one pass to get it right. I love the process of turning need into finished solution, so this new machine will provide years of satisfaction beyond the work it will help me do.
 

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Like any designer, I want to understand all the limits and forces at work in placing and removing the BH on/off the dolly. Higher CoG and moving over wash-rock gravel add two wild-card limit/force variables that I can only truly know in practice, so it may take more than one pass to get it right. I love the process of turning need into finished solution, so this new machine will provide years of satisfaction beyond the work it will help me do.
I think your biggest challenge will be stability over a loose surface. I would probably start with a design with a nice wide wheel footprint to center the weight and reduce the chance for pushing and accidentally tipping the backhoe over. I'd also create a cradle so it couldn't be pushed off the dolly accidentally if the dolly wheels got bound up and stuck. No matter what, we love pictures here so please share what you can up with! Good luck!

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
 

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Like any designer, I want to understand all the limits and forces at work in placing and removing the BH on/off the dolly. Higher CoG and moving over wash-rock gravel add two wild-card limit/force variables that I can only truly know in practice, so it may take more than one pass to get it right. I love the process of turning need into finished solution, so this new machine will provide years of satisfaction beyond the work it will help me do.
If you look at my dolly, you can see that the front "main" part of the assembly has three points on which it sits. This adds a tremendous amount of stability side to side. I'll never say it's fool proof because anything can happen which is why I also use a rachet strap. I just felt that this set up gave me my best chance for success. So far, so good but my garage has a concrete floor so I guess I could take some liberties.

On a side note, does anyone know the weight of these attachments. I think someone posted the weight of the BH somewhere (may have even been this thread), but I would love to know the weight of the front loader as well. Just trying to figure out what I can and can't haul on my trailer should I ever need to.
 

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Like any designer, I want to understand all the limits and forces at work in placing and removing the BH on/off the dolly. Higher CoG and moving over wash-rock gravel add two wild-card limit/force variables that I can only truly know in practice, so it may take more than one pass to get it right. I love the process of turning need into finished solution, so this new machine will provide years of satisfaction beyond the work it will help me do.
Something to keep in mind is that a dolly will move with the slightest push or pull. The hydraulics on a back hoe do not operate on a 'slight push or pull' basis. Any motion of the bucket is backed by up to a ton of force, and you can't install it on the tractor without moving the bucket while it is on the dolly. The stabilizers will lift and drop the tractor end of the hoe into the U- shaped receivers, but the hoe has to tilt to install the pins. There are 4 cylinders which can move the bucket.

A TLB will roll at an angle that is quite small compared to the angle required to roll a GT. It got my attention when I rolled mine and it still had the high side tires well on level ground.
 

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A Proud MF'er
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On a side note, does anyone know the weight of these attachments. I think someone posted the weight of the BH somewhere (may have even been this thread), but I would love to know the weight of the front loader as well. Just trying to figure out what I can and can't haul on my trailer should I ever need to.
I can get close... Basic tractor: 1455 lb, FEL: 325 lb, BH: 870 lb, TOTAL for GC2410: 2650 lb (I gathered/deduced these from a variety of sources, including the operators manual.)

For that reason, I needed to go with 10" casters to have each handle 350lb. 8" caster total weight ratings were too close to the weight of the BH.

I agree with as wide a stance as possible, yet the stabilizers need zero-clearance to the deck to contact the ground without interference. And immediately behind the flat-bottomed part of the BH base, the assembly drops for the mounting bracket points. this limits a rear crossbar to get the rear (fixed) casters outboard of the base.

That option does seem worthy of some more thought to see if there is a design that would work to accommodate both the need for caster width and have openings for the drop points...
 

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A Proud MF'er
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And here we are, the "dolly days" of summer... Gotta say, after working to get this 2410 up to snuff, I have been working on the property with it and it's *amazing* in its ability to work hard! Only 20 hours on the clock since I bought it and I'm amazed at how much work it has done. Anyway, I digress...

Thinking of winter in the middle of summer, I was able to source the pneumatic casters I needed on sale and save about 1/2 on the 8 casters I needed. Once they were in hand, I picked up the steel and got busy over the past week.

The slide show (see link to right..) illustrates the process and results. https://photos.app.goo.gl/Sa3vddD4aSSeTeHv5

I admit I have only tried the backhoe dolly in trial mode and the early results were encouraging. It fit the backhoe nicely and I was able to use the dipper arm to position the dolly under the base once it was raised off the mounts by the stabilizers. I was concerned there would be difficulty getting the various ground and leverage positions to cooperate with the placement of the dolly, but that one worked out beautifully.

The base weight is significant, and the tires had only about 10lb pressure in them, it was obvious on the back end that more air pressure was needed. The tires are rated for 30lb max and at that pressure they are pretty stiff. Hopefully they can keep the pressure over the winter. I will make sure the air stems are accessible when in storage position. I will also remove the backhoe in close proximity to the storage position to minimize travel distance and keep the area of travel very level.

One other thing I did was use a youtube-found technique to prep the steel. I built a trough, lined with 6 mil vapour barrier and used white vinegar to remove rust and millscale from the steel before welding. It worked pretty well, and I left the steel in the vinegar for about 36 hours until it was clean enough to really notice.

I like the way they turned out, but have yet to really try them. I'm using the loader and backhoe almost every day so I'll need a down day to do some proper testing.

Hope everyone is having a good summer...
 

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Discussion Starter #51
WOW...what a nice job on the dollies.
 

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A Proud MF'er
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The proof is in the putting. And it came the time to put the backhoe away and test the design and build of the dolly.

Thankfully, one less issue is the no-longer-moving 3/4-minus gravel. I was rebuilding and raising part of the drive after putting a concrete pad in the carport and had some "crusher dust" (1/4"-minus, no clay) to spare. Adding an inch of the dust to the gravel has locked it up pretty good, which was a real benefit when the backhoe was finally on the dolly. I was prepared to use plywood, as someone suggested, but the topping was enough.

I did the dismount a few feet from the storage spot, and was able to use the dipper with the bucket resting on the dolly to slide it under the base once it was raised by the stabilizers. Once on the casters, the rolling was smooth if not effortless. Turning this rig needs a pretty solid surface to resist the swivel casters digging in. I will end up using some plywood in future to cover the few feet with no chance of digging in. Overall, the dolly did work about as well as I hoped, and the stability was manageable while in motion. I was able to turn it 180º and tuck it away in the corner.

After some more thinking, I also blocked the frame up with the casters resting an inch off the deck. If they lose air over the winter (almost a certainty..) I won't end up with the thing on its side.

All is depicted in this brief album of images. If you visit, click the first image to scroll through the album with captions.

Backhoe Dolly: First Run
 

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Glad it all worked out. In the first series of pixs you had purchased eight wheels and made two dollies. See in the final that you were able to do it with just the four. I'm sure that is more stable than it would have been with separate dollies under each end. And the rock dust did a nice job leveling ad tightening use the 3/4 stone.
MikeC
 

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In the first series of pixs you had purchased eight wheels and made two dollies. See in the final that you were able to do it with just the four.
In fact, the second dolly was built for the FEL, which is due to come off for the first time (for me..) tomorrow. This thread was only about backhoe dollies so I tried to keep it to that.

When designing the backhoe dolly, I had mounted and dismounted the backhoe a few times. With the FEL, I'm relying on the physics really, as I've never had it off.

I can see it wants a "floor-at-grade" to make the design physics work, but my dolly deck is around 9" above grade, so I am trying to decide whether to work with a more radical initial dump angle on the bucket to compensate for the height of the dolly with the wheels at grade, or to use a natural slope and some ramps to bring "grade" up to the height of the dolly deck, as 'depicted' in the image below. Simpler is better, but we'll see which wins on the day...
 

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In fact, the second dolly was built for the FEL, which is due to come off for the first time (for me..) tomorrow. This thread was only about backhoe dollies so I tried to keep it to that.

When designing the backhoe dolly, I had mounted and dismounted the backhoe a few times. With the FEL, I'm relying on the physics really, as I've never had it off.

I can see it wants a "floor-at-grade" to make the design physics work, but my dolly deck is around 9" above grade, so I am trying to decide whether to work with a more radical initial dump angle on the bucket to compensate for the height of the dolly with the wheels at grade, or to use a natural slope and some ramps to bring "grade" up to the height of the dolly deck, as 'depicted' in the image below. Simpler is better, but we'll see which wins on the day...
The stand-off supports are too long with the higher platform. Make a new set that is adjustable in length.

For the older model 2350 loader, it's even simpler. Clamp the bucket flat on the dolly and use the bucket curl to raise the arms high enough to set the stand-offs. If there isn't a lip installed on the dolly to slide the cutting edge under, add some weight to the bucket. Cement patio stones, concrete blocks, a scoop of dirt, or whatever, can be used to hold the bucket down.

You have hydraulics available. Think outside the box! The only reasons to have a ramp or blocking under the front tires is if there is no support for the bucket, such as when removing an arm cylinder while the bucket is installed, or if the hoses are too short to allow the arms to rise to a suitable height while disconnecting from the tractor.

I would also recommend that you figure out a way to immobilize the dolly while installing or removing the loader. Trust me, you do not want it wandering off part way through the process.
 
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