My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After 15 years on the job,i find myself unemployed.The good news is that i qualify for a pell grant for school.Thinking of going into I.T.Anyone in the buisness have an opinion on what part of I.T needs educated employees?
Advanced server mgt. ?
Networking?
Web Page dvlt.?
All the above?
Just dont know where to start with the limited funds i will have i need to pick carefully.What area should i get into?
thanks Scott
 

·
The Magnificent
Joined
·
20,952 Posts
Thanks to off-shoring, IT isn't the gold mine it once was.

But, my first question is whether you have a BS degree in anything? Companies are almost requiring it anymore.

What are your salary expectations?

A+ cert - worth $10/hr
CCNA, Network plus - worth $15-$25/hr

If you like the hardware end of things, some companies have a bootcamp program for relative newbies and recent college graduates. The starting salaries are not remendous, but hey, you get 6 weeks or so of paid intense training.

And if you're under 38, there is still the military (in certain fields).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,038 Posts
if you want money in IT, you have to specialize... general PC techs are making minimum wage at Staples and Best Buy now days... The CCNA has been de-valued from it's once semi-prestigious status since they started offering it to 14 year olds in vo-tech.

I went from a one all, be all pc tech in high school and college to a network admin after college. Then I had some co-workers tell me what I "should" be doing. That's when I went back for my Master's in Network Security. My 9-5 job now is in IT/IS auditing. When you get into more specific fields that were you can still find some stuff.

In my opinion, everyone in IT should know all the basics as far as hardware goes (A+) no matter what they do. I know guys that play with databases all day and make good money, guys who write mainframe code, guys who do network maintenance, guys who.......

Another thing to ask is what's available in your area and are you willing to relocate if not... I'm luckily enough to work out of my house a lot, but I do travel to Bristol, VA 3/4 times a week and that's 100 miles one way... What traditional IT jobs are within 15-20 miles from me are the guys who came in on the ground floor and set the stuff up and have common sense and a HS degree. Anything else for me would be at least a 1 hour trip.
 

·
Has anyone seen ChimChim?
Joined
·
6,553 Posts
My suggestion.. Skip IT... Become an Engineer... Civil, Mechanical, Electrical take your pick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,038 Posts
mechanical engineers build weapon systems, civil engineers build targets...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
There is still a lot of opportunity if you get into the right IT specialty. A lot depends on your abilities and skills.

Hardware techs are a dime a dozen. PC's have become so simple that anyone can swap hardware. It's the low end of the hardware/networking branch. It might be a start, but you'll want to set your sights higher.

A good network admin can make a good wage, but you'll need to know a lot about networking. You'll also need to know Exchange, Cisco, Novell and Unix, in addition to network security, Active Directory/Group Policy and server administration. A good network admin has to wear a lot of hats.

SQL/Oracle/Database design and development is very lucrative right now, and will be for some time to come. There are a lot of companies that are transitioning applications from flat file formats to relational databases, and that trend will continue for a while. A good DBA can make 60-70K a year. A good developer can add 10-20K to the DBA's salary. Many of those same companies need report developers; the same basic knowledge but the skill and talent to make the data work and look good on paper.

.NET, PHP and Java are areas that don't have enough qualified talent. I know of a couple of companies that have outsourced code writing because they can't find enough local programmers. A good programmer can easily do 80K or more in many markets.

Make sure you are willing to commit the time to your education, and make sure it's something that you'll want to do. If so, it's still a well paying field with plenty of opportunity. Just remember-what you're doing now in IT will be entirely different in 5 years. If you're OK with that and willing to keep upgrading your education you'll do fine. It's a field that has served me well for 40+ years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,038 Posts
PopRivit has a lot of good points. A couple years ago I got talked into teaching a couple adjunct IT classes for a local college. Big mistake. I saw nothing but students who thought they could read a book and know it all. IT is something that you truly have to take time outside of the classroom to devote to learning as much as you can. Sorda like GTs, just because you have a JD you still need to know specs, makes, features of other brands... they do exist!

It's also somewhat sad, but IT is becoming more and more certification driven. Even if you're the smarted IT guy in the world, if you don't have those acronyms after your name you probably aren't going to even get your resume looked at. I've got the certs but this is what I've been taught and believe... A degree only proves that you can be taught. A certification only proves you can take a test...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
If you don't want to go the Active Duty military route, the reserves/guard is a great option. Free training, part time employment and they will pay for your college too... I was active duty Air Force for 7 years, still in the reserves. It set me up for a great job as a government civilian - in IT as well...
 

·
The Admin from... Nowhere!
Joined
·
13,933 Posts
One area that is often overlooked in IT is User Support and Training... It IS actually one of the few places in IT where having an IT certification or a heavy-duty background in programming or hardware is NOT mandatory.... However, you gotta find the right size of organization with the right client base to be able to afford and/or require user support, and you usually have to start out at the bottom, working front-line Help Desk.... The three most valuable qualities for a successful User Support person are patience, effective communication skills and a good sense of humour... Obviously, you need to have an aptitude for technology, but it is equally as important to be able to listen, learn, analyze and educate... After doing an Education Degree and not being able to find a job as a History or English teacher, I turned to computers. I'd always had an interest, and HAD done some courses in my undergrad. Turns out, computers is the only thing that has ever gotten me a job. However, the fact that I can read analytically and write coherently, and I can translate from hard-core Unix/Windows/Network/Database geek to technophobe end-user and vice versa with ease and élan has KEPT me in my job.... If you're looking at going back to school ANYWAY for IT skills, you figure you have those three qualities I mentioned above, AND you figure you'd be able to handle end user support, it can't hurt to find a mid-sized educational institution and check to see if they're looking for any part-time Help Desk support staff, and work shifts while you're taking classes...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,556 Posts
Just tonight at work we had one of our computers (a work station) got the blue screen of death when we had to do a "hot shutdown." This was because our work stand next to a aircraft sprang a water leak and we had to pull the plug really fast, we had no time to shut down the computers and it basically fried the hard drive. I put in a work request for the computer and the tech came out and replaced the computer with a another computer. When I asked him about this he said that the computer had to go a vendor to have the hard drive replaced. They no longer did it in house and had laid off and off loaded all the repairs.

These computers are all slated to be retired in the next 6 months and replaced with new all in one computers with Windows 7 as they are getting rid of the towers as they are using a lot of money to maintain them. I asked about the all in one computers and they are to be leased and if they have a problem the techs just come and replace them with another one. IT in a big company is now more then ever just about dead.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top