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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
For want not to dis-assemble a brand new engine, can anyone give me an answer to the following?

I have a brand new Briggs & Stratton 40F777-0113 18 H.P.engine which has the 16A regulated DC electrical system. The engine has three wires coming out of it as pictured in the graphic below. What I believe is correct, as I understand it, is as the graphic below depicts.

My Question; Can anyone fill in the questioned connections? I've numbered them for your explanation clarity (i.e. 3 goes to 4, etc.). I've looked all over the Internet and cannot locate any B&S engine internal wiring diagrams that are helpful. Any help would be greatly appreciated.


 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
For lack of time, I had to dis-assemble the new engine due to a schedule change. I'll answer my own question for anyone else in the forum who may need it in the future.
  1. The gray lead at the main connector (?#1) goes to the fuel shut-off solenoid on the carburetor (not shown in graphic).
  2. The black lead (?#2) goes to both Armatures (?#'s 6&7).
  3. The black lead off the regulator (?#3) goes to stator (?#5).
  4. Black on the Stator (?#4) goes back to the key switch (not shown).
 

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Thanks, McGuire2003. I have a Briggs that I'd like a wiring diagram for, but I haven't found one either. Your info here will be a help in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Correction to number 4 in my previous post.

There is no black lead coming off the stator. The stator is physically grounded to the engine and is (in the 16 Amp variety) an AC only output which feeds the regulator assembly. This engine is a DC output only at 16A max output current.
 

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Hello McGuire2003, I don't mean to throw a monkey wrench into this, but I disagree with you. Going by your diagram, if the stator has one black and one red wire coming out of it, that is the Briggs Dual-Circuit alternator. Is the plastic plug on the end white, whit a raised nub on one side? The correct stator to use with the 16amp regulator has two black wires going to a yellow plug. This yellow plug mates up with a corresponding yellow plug on the regulator.

Seth K. Pyle
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
You may be right, as I have no idea. Hence why I was asking the question in the first place. I wasn't about to pull the flywheel off of a brand new engine to find the connector end feeding the regulator, just to satisfy my curiosity. I only removed the top shroud, which was enough to identify what the four leads at the engine main connector had to go to in order to replace the engine on a Murray tractor.

Ive since found out, unlike most tractors, the Murray's do not have a continuously hot wire in the key-switch RUN position (which is required to keep the fuel solenoid open while running). I was trying to figure out how to tie the new engine into the existing electrical system without to much rearranging of the existing wiring. By the way, I did figure out how to wire it so it runs and stops as it should. The tractors now back in the owners hands.

On this engine. a single lead goes from the regulator and travels under the flywheel. What's up there, aside from a 16A stator of unknown wiring configuration, who knows? A single lead is coming out and going to the regulator, therefore I ASSUMED a single lead off the stator, and KNOW that all B&S Stators are hard-grounded. Anyone else have direct knowledge of this?

I appreciate you keeping me honest though! Thanks for the reply.

Hello McGuire2003, I don't mean to throw a monkey wrench into this, but I disagree with you. Going by your diagram, if the stator has one black and one red wire coming out of it, that is the Briggs Dual-Circuit alternator. Is the plastic plug on the end white, whit a raised nub on one side? The correct stator to use with the 16amp regulator has two black wires going to a yellow plug. This yellow plug mates up with a corresponding yellow plug on the regulator.

Seth K. Pyle
 
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