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Administrator - We’re all friends here
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VS puts out the newsletter Eric. They are checking to see where the picture came from. :dunno:
 

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Make Smoke, Boil Water!
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I found another old slide that should be of some interest; it also has a story.

This would have been from about 1977, when my Dad got a permit for us to cut wood up in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Knowing that we'd have an hour of "fire watch" time, I put my camera in a safe place inside my pickup and off we went.

Now, my Dad had his share of connections with Weyerhaeuser, and he got the location of a couple really good spots to go get 'culls'. Thing was, they were nearly halfway to Yakima from where we were. But the price would be right for 3-4 cord of wood, so it was worth all the work.

Armed with a really nice lunch (courtesy of my wife), the good Forest Service map, and a good compass, we found the right set of roads in the right places, and wow, did we find good stuff to cut up! Fir, Alder, Maple, it all got sized to fit in the trucks and loaded. It was always a real pleasure, working alongside my Dad; my brother never appreciated him and his kind, gentle wisdom the way I did.

We worked for a good couple hours, and after we had the trucks all loaded and ready to go, it was time for our fire watch. I looked at my watch and the time started.

We pulled out our lunch, and it was then that we really had time to look around and appreciate where we were. We were on the side of a steep hill, not quite steep enough to call it a cliff, but just a wide spot where they'd dumped the culls was mostly taken up by the culls themselves. In short, they'd messed up by dumping too many culls and couldn't get a log truck and a loader into that space at the same time. This was the spot my Dad had been told about.

But WOW did we have a view! It was only after we stopped working that we realized how icy and strong the wind was. The hot coffee got cold shortly after we poured it into our cups. But we were required to make that fire watch time, and by golly, we were going to do it!

I pulled out my camera and tried to make a shot with stiff, shaking fingers. And my nice tripod was at home because it didn't fit behind the seat in the truck. So I did the same kind of trick I'd done to get the blimp shot, and put the camera on the roof of my little pickup. I made a 10-second exposure to try to get the best depth of field and color saturation. This shot here is the result. And for-sure, the sky was really that deep, deep, blue.

So where were we? On the side of Mt. St. Helens, looking East toward Mt. Adams. That spot doesn't exist anymore, it's gone, just like my Dad.

I still remember the drive out: Loaded, it took about an hour until we hit paved road, because we were taking it easy. Then it took another half hour until we hit actual highway.

Thought this would be a good way to end the month, as a way of saying :thanku: to all.
 

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Senior MTF Member
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I found another old slide that should be of some interest; it also has a story.

This would have been from about 1977, when my Dad got a permit for us to cut wood up in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Knowing that we'd have an hour of "fire watch" time, I put my camera in a safe place inside my pickup and off we went.

Now, my Dad had his share of connections with Weyerhaeuser, and he got the location of a couple really good spots to go get 'culls'. Thing was, they were nearly halfway to Yakima from where we were. But the price would be right for 3-4 cord of wood, so it was worth all the work.

Armed with a really nice lunch (courtesy of my wife), the good Forest Service map, and a good compass, we found the right set of roads in the right places, and wow, did we find good stuff to cut up! Fir, Alder, Maple, it all got sized to fit in the trucks and loaded. It was always a real pleasure, working alongside my Dad; my brother never appreciated him and his kind, gentle wisdom the way I did.

We worked for a good couple hours, and after we had the trucks all loaded and ready to go, it was time for our fire watch. I looked at my watch and the time started.

We pulled out our lunch, and it was then that we really had time to look around and appreciate where we were. We were on the side of a steep hill, not quite steep enough to call it a cliff, but just a wide spot where they'd dumped the culls was mostly taken up by the culls themselves. In short, they'd messed up by dumping too many culls and couldn't get a log truck and a loader into that space at the same time. This was the spot my Dad had been told about.

But WOW did we have a view! It was only after we stopped working that we realized how icy and strong the wind was. The hot coffee got cold shortly after we poured it into our cups. But we were required to make that fire watch time, and by golly, we were going to do it!

I pulled out my camera and tried to make a shot with stiff, shaking fingers. And my nice tripod was at home because it didn't fit behind the seat in the truck. So I did the same kind of trick I'd done to get the blimp shot, and put the camera on the roof of my little pickup. I made a 10-second exposure to try to get the best depth of field and color saturation. This shot here is the result. And for-sure, the sky was really that deep, deep, blue.

So where were we? On the side of Mt. St. Helens, looking East toward Mt. Adams. That spot doesn't exist anymore, it's gone, just like my Dad.

I still remember the drive out: Loaded, it took about an hour until we hit paved road, because we were taking it easy. Then it took another half hour until we hit actual highway.

Thought this would be a good way to end the month, as a way of saying :thanku: to all.

A beautiful picture. Thanks for sharing both the picture and the great memories.
:thThumbsU
 

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Late posting but congrats for the well deserved FMoM recognition, Steamguy!!
 
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