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Discussion Starter #1
With a Buford Bucket on the way and lots of earth to move, I need to get some lug tires. I've got a full set of spare rims,(by the way, anyone need rear turf tires or front turfs & rims?), so all I need now is the tires. Not into spending a bunch of money, so off to the Bay I go.

Deestone 6 ply lugs 23 X 10.5 - 12 are going for $150 delivered to my door. That seems pretty darn good for a 6 ply tire. Yes, they are from Thailand - no big surprise there. Anyone have any experience??

Thanks,
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, I have an AWS 455. I don't want to take the chance of any binding or rubbing as I may use the lugs with my 60" deck.

By the way, $150 is for a PAIR delivered.
 

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I had them on my la130....personally I liked them a lot.
 

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I have a set of True Powers and a set of Duro lug tures that I switch back and forth amongst the herd. They both offer good traction and either is a good choice. However there is 2 distinct differences between them. The Duro's have more lugs. The Duro's are much smaller even tho' the tire size is the same on the size written on the side. I have never actually measured 'em but there is at least 1 inch of difference in height alone. Both are 26 x 12 x 12.
One thing about lugs you may not like is that if you do happen to spin them they will dig holes. Quickly.
And you WILL need some weight on the back even for a Buford Bucket.
 

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Just John Deere
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The following picture is Deestone 23X10.5-12 lug tires on the left and Carlisle 23X10.5-12 Super Lugs on the right. They are both mounted on standard JD 10.5 rims. A picture is worth a thousand words.

I bought 1 set of Deestones because they were cheaper tires and I received cheaper tires. I will never again buy them. The tires are narrower and are almost impossible to mount on a 10.5 rim. I contacted the online seller who informed me that they do run smaller. I guess the number stamped on the tire is just a ballpark number. The rubber also did not seem to wear as long as the Carlisle tires.

I now always buy Carlisle Tru Power lugs which cost more, but quality usually does. The lugs on Super Lugs are spaced apart more that the Tru Power lug tires. This causes the Super Lugs to be like riding on a wash board. The lugs on Tru Powers are spaced closer and are thicker. They also seem to wear the the least of the three and are a smoother ride on pavement.


Rear Tires Stones.JPG

This is my 455 with a Buford Bucket and 26X12-12 Tru Power Lugs. You can see how much tighter the lugs are than the other. The more lugs the tire has, the more grip that it will have.

455 Rear Tire and weights.JPG

But that is just my opinion.

GotDeeres
 

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I must share my experiance.. I had 4 Garden tractors. That I pulled. 300,, 312, 316, 140, The differance was The Turff tire would out pull the Lug/bar tire by about 20 %; (i pulled and changed them). Life is good;
 

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I must share my experiance.. I had 4 Garden tractors. That I pulled. 300,, 312, 316, 140, The differance was The Turff tire would out pull the Lug/bar tire by about 20 %; (i pulled and changed them). Life is good;

"Pulling" on a hard surface is different than working on a lawn etc. where a turf tire's tread will pack if you spin.
 

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Just John Deere
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Tony,

This is my John Deere 322 with bar lugs mowing a wet steep hill. My 345 with turf tires would just spin. Each type of tire is designed for a particular purpose. Bar lugs (Tractor Tires) are designed for loose, slick, wet, soil conditions. Turf tires are for a completely different type of soil condition. Did you notice that when going DOWN the hill the bar lugs did not slip. My 345 would have slid down the hill. I agree with you that turf tires may be better for a tractor pull track, but for plowing the south 40, my vote is for bar lugs.

Don"t you just love the sound of the Yanmar 3 cylinder engine going up the hill when the governor opens up. A 322 is great garden tractor. The 18 HP engine is a real power house!


GotDeeres
 

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OK,

Slick mud is different from snow and ice. This is Atlanta in 2011 where the schools were closed for 10 days because they just waited for a warm streak to melt the snow and ice. Snow equipment is scarce down here. This picture is my 455 with the Tru Powers plowing snow. I stopped for a picture not because I could not push more snow.

I made $650 clearing a car dealer's lot since he could not get anyone else to do it. While plowing his lot, another dealer across the street offered me
the same amount to do his lot. Being late in the day and I was half frozen, I declined.

The trick to traction is to have the right tire, weight, and operator.

455 snow2.JPG

GotDeeres
 

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Tony,

This is my John Deere 322 with bar lugs mowing a wet steep hill. My 345 with turf tires would just spin. Each type of tire is designed for a particular purpose. Bar lugs (Tractor Tires) are designed for loose, slick, wet, soil conditions. Turf tires are for a completely different type of soil condition. Did you notice that when going DOWN the hill the bar lugs did not slip. My 345 would have slid down the hill. I agree with you that turf tires may be better for a tractor pull track, but for plowing the south 40, my vote is for bar lugs.

Don"t you just love the sound of the Yanmar 3 cylinder engine going up the hill when the governor opens up. A 322 is great garden tractor. The 18 HP engine is a real power house!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhtaxTaJIuU

GotDeeres
That hill would be covered with vinca or liriope if it was on my property. Now having said that...I loved watching your 322 show it who's boss.
 
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