My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Collector of many tractors
Joined
·
15,270 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I do all the time... I hate pulling a rope... Just today I started a leaf blower that has not started in 2 years... I just put a socket adapter in the drill and put it on the flywheel nut and drill away... It took about 10 minutes of drilling before the engine started... I start all my lawnboys with my drill...
 

·
I'd rather be threshing!
Joined
·
3,997 Posts
Holy cow! 10 minutes?

I remember from the early 70's there was a "Seen on TV" thing that was an inverted cone that would bolt on to the crankshaft in place of the flywheel nut, and then there was a rubber "cone" you would chuck up in your electric drill. Put the drill end in the flywheel end with a little bit of pressure and squeeze the trigger. I wonder if they still make such a device...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,406 Posts
Does THAT question bring back memories!:D My Dad used to have a late '50's Monty/Ward 21" with 2 forward speeds and blade clutch. We used that thing until he couldn't get it started one Saturday and bought a factory underpowered Jacobsen from his local Ripoff Bros. Mower service... I inhereted the M/W. The mower had exactly everyting wrong with it that a worn out engine could have and hated to be pulled 50+ times to start.

I rigged an arbor for a drill grindstone with a rubber crutch tip and deep socket for the top crank nut. By adjusting the arbor nuts I could get just the right tension to start the engine during the 2-4 minute "crankiing period".:D:D:D:D I got an entire Summer out of that poor beast w/o even pulling the head.:D
 

·
Landscaping Nut
Joined
·
1,362 Posts
model airplanes still use the inverted rubber cone driven by a 12 volt handheld motored powered by a cordless battery pack. Works great for model airplane engines.
 

·
certified tractor nut
Joined
·
1,424 Posts
i think they still make those adapters if i remember right northern tool and equipment sells them
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I destroyed one of my father's drill doing that. The engine kicked back and broke a gear inside the drill.
I was just about to post that this ^ seems like a real possibility.

I would also think that if you got a socket hung it would do all kinds of bad things to your drill.

The friction method described above seems like an interesting idea...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
695 Posts
I was just about to post that this ^ seems like a real possibility.

I would also think that if you got a socket hung it would do all kinds of bad things to your drill.

The friction method described above seems like an interesting idea...
To say nothing of your arm, face and other body parts!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Started my old craftsman rider that way for years. $9.99 drill was way cheaper than a new starter. Believe it or not, that socket didn't hurt too bad the first time it hit me.
 

·
15,000 +posts!
Joined
·
20,435 Posts
I had that setup on a Craftsman mower my dad had--still have the thing you put in the drill chuck,but I sold the mower years ago,and forgot to take the other part off it that screwed to the flywheel--it looked like a peice of tubing that has a pair of spiral slots cut in it,that operate like the spiral splines in a starters drive ,so if it kicks back ,or when it starts,it will automatically disengage itself..

I still have the 3/8" Stanley drill I stripped the gears out of I used to start it too!..but it did work great until the drill stripped its cogs!..I think you need a REAL drill,like a Rockwell oldie 1/2" or bigger ,the kind that weigh 30 lbs and have pipe handles on them,to be able to have enough guts to whip over an engine and used as a starter without killing it...it did say on the instructions "no cordless drills known at this time,have sufficient power to operate this device--use with CORDED drills only!"...(they forgot to add BIG--I doubt most 1/4" or 3/8" drills will start anything over a 3.5 HP engine myself..

I posted here before about how I use a old Chevy or Ford car starter to shart my engines,especially when working on them--I hate pulling ropes too,nothing throws by back out quicker--but once I get the engines tuned and so they start with a few pulls,I'll deal with a recoil..if they dont,I put an engine on that WILL start with a few pulls,or keep fixing it till it does..the main bummer about using a drill or car starter is you cant have BOTH a recoil AND use the starter,since you use the flywheel nut to spin the engine with a socket..

I dont like "electric start only" engines with no recoil either--your battery croaks way out in the back yard,or the starter quits,now you have a long hike to get a battery and jumper cables or a jump pack to get it started again!..

I've been tempted to couple a car starter right to a Briggs engine--since they have a "starter clutch",you dont have to worry about the engine spinning the starter after its running...I've wondered if you could use a typical starter as a starter generator too--not sure if the bushings would last long,but,they are not much different than those in a starter generator either..hhmmmm!..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
They are called a SPIN START. I have one on a old lawn mower of mine us a drill that has a bent shaft so it's a junk drill. Works great, really saved the shoulder from trying to pull the cord. Northern used to sell them at one time, but not currently available.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,477 Posts
this is all interesting....but doesn't it just make more sense to fix the engine so it starts in a pull or 2? I hate pulling ropes too, but I hate buying batterys even more. So I keep my engines so they start easy. If it takes more than a few pulls to start one of my engines, it needs work.
 

·
{This Space Available}
Joined
·
1,549 Posts
Yep. We had a David Bradley 2-wheeleer which used a starter rope. Sometimes it was a nightmare to start. So, my dad rigged a pulley onto a shaft and chucked it into his 1950's vintage Cummins 1/2" drill. An old v-belt around the drill pulley and the rope starter cup....voila...fired right up. Usually, the v-belt flew off after the engine started. Of course, it was dangerous as heck. But there were fewer lawyers in the 1960's!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,051 Posts
I used one while resurrecting my LB5232 from the cript. Worked great. I think I would have broken many ropes if not for the drill. Didn't hurt my drill one bit. It's a Milw.1/2" magnum. If it couldn't turn over a lb engine it wouldn't be much of a drill IMO.

MU
 

·
Make Smoke, Boil Water!
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
Montgomery Wards I think it was, had this gold-colored mower back in the '60s that had this foldup windup crank on the top. To start the engine, you flipped over the handle and there was a knob for you to grab. You grabbed the crank, stood over the top of the mower and wound it up like a clock.

My uncle had one. Winding it up it went 'clackita-clackita-clackita...' then when you flipped over the handle, the spring engaged the flywheel, and WHAM the engine started. Most of the time. Just had to remember to keep your feet away from under the mower when you flipped over the crank.

I thought that was the coolest thing I'd ever seen, especially after the stupid arm-buster Briggs engines with the cone on the flywheel and a slit for a rope with a handle on one end and a knot on the other.

You slipped the knot down inside the cone, wrapped the rope around it, set the throttle and choke just so, then steeled yourself and gave 'er your best, hardest yank.

Sometimes the stupid engine would buck and just about pull your shoulder out of the socket, and other times the blasted rope would catch and wind up real fast in the flywheel and just about pull you off your feet. Then you'd have to lean on the sheetmetal tab that shorted out the plug and kill that motor you'd worked so hard to start (after at least five real hard pulls), so you could get the rope and handle out of the engine before it flew out at you.

Those memories are still too vivid...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,406 Posts
Of course, it was dangerous as heck. But there were fewer lawyers in the 1960's!!!
Exactly WHY we have so much knowledge of what works and what don't today! Wanna see MY scars?:ROF:D:D Folks today are becoming far less "self-experimental" and far more "frightened girls" when they see stuff with exposed gears, levers and spiinning stuff...

"Why back in MY day, ..................................................!! (Fill in the blank)
:sidelaugh
 

·
Deceased October 2017
Joined
·
21,767 Posts
Anyone start your engines with a drill???

Nope ... But I once started a drill with an engine :D :D

My dad used to start his old lawn boy with a drill ..everytime he used it
 

·
15,000 +posts!
Joined
·
20,435 Posts
I had a few vertical shaft Tecumseh's and Briggs motors that had that crazy "wind up" starter!..I wasn't a fan of it,it took too long to wind it up,then it would only spin the motor over maybe two revolutions if you were lucky!..after the spring busted in one I had,and I figured I'd take it apart and re-wind the spring in it ,I soon learned the spring in those are MUCH beefier than one used in a recoil,and I almost lost my FACE when it sprung out at me like a cobra,when I attempted to fool with it!..I bolted a recoil on in its place instead!..those things are deadly!..

My Sears 8M came only with the rope and the pulley an 8 HP briggs normally had in its recoil housing when I got it--it was a challenge to use just the pulley and rope to get ut running,then slide it off the starter clutch after it was running!..glad I found a recoil to fit it last Sunday at the swap meet..but an electric start engine would be even better!..

I also had a Briggs model "A" engine that had a hand crank starter!--it usually worked great,but if you didn't put enough "ooomph" in your spin,and it decided to fire and kick back,it could sprain a thumb or wrist easily..the worst engine with a hand crank I've started is a two way tie between a two cylinder Wisconsin that ripped a shoulder muscle once when it kicked back,and a Hercules 4 cyl gas engine on a water pump that not only threw me back about 10 feet when it backfired,both my arms felt like I'd been yanked off the ground ,and stretched about 6" longer--they ached for a month after that..I never attempted to use the crank again on that engine,only the starter from then on!..

I dont know why they dont make more kick starters for small engines--I had one on my mini bike on a 5 HP Tecumseh,and it sure beat pulling a rope!..had a Briggs washing machine motor with one too,a two cylinder one--was a neat looking motor but was gutless..since my legs are a lot stronger than my back is or arms are now,I'd much rather have a kick start on a horizontal shaft engine..nothing beats turning a key though!..it's a far cry from winding the rope around a cup,pulling your back muscles,then whipping yourself with the rope after it failed to start!..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
I also Don't like to Crank or Pull start engines, And maybe some one here has some Info to share with us to adapt an elec starter ?to these engines ?
Thanks Much for ANY INFO. NU
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top