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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was browsing the internet and saw a photo of a 345 that has a linear actuator mounted right behind the blade, couldn't tell if its to angle the blade or not.

Has anyone done this, or could someone point me towards someone who has?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
After reading a thread about a shear pin on a blade and seeing 396_Big_Block photos, I am even more enthused to try to make the blade power angled with a linear actuator.

Anyone think it can be done? Looks like there are even holes in the bracket already (i assume for deere's manual turn from seat angle kit).

Link to photos in shear pin thread
 

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Looks like it would be a fairly straight forward project, but you wouldn't want to go cheap on the actuator since there could potentially be some fairly high shock loads if you caught something with the edge of the blade. :rauch10:
 

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Looks like it would be a fairly straight forward project, but you wouldn't want to go cheap on the actuator since there could potentially be some fairly high shock loads if you caught something with the edge of the blade. :rauch10:
:ditto:

The electric actuators are going to be more sensitive to damage from shock loads than hydraulics. I have contemplated power angling on my x500 front blade. The biggest challenge is how to maintain and operate the 3/4" retractable pin that holds the blade in place once the blade is in place.

If you do go electric, I would consult the linaear actuator manufacture about shock first.
 

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Looks like it would be a fairly straight forward project, but you wouldn't want to go cheap on the actuator since there could potentially be some fairly high shock loads if you caught something with the edge of the blade. :rauch10:
Don't mean to hijack this thread, but how do you tell a heavy duty actuator from a cheap imitation? I know next to nothing about actuators but know others on this forum have used them for various projects.
 

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Don't mean to hijack this thread, but how do you tell a heavy duty actuator from a cheap imitation? I know next to nothing about actuators but know others on this forum have used them for various projects.
I don't know about cheap imitations. To me a cheap imitation is a product that falsely proposes to be equal to something else when in fact it is not.

I own two different linear actuators from Thomson. They are really good at publishing specs for their products I have found. I really like the spec that tells you how long (in number of complete cycles) their actuators will last. They rate them based on using the internal clutch, and based on percentage of rated load. I think this is really good information. This would be good to have when comparing similarly capacity actuators. Perhaps if you need one that only needs one to last 1000 cycles you might opt to purchase a cheapy. But if you want one that will last 50000 cycles you might be inclined to spend much more.

Thomson also makes multiple units that can apply the same amount of force under power, but can withstand widely different static loads. So just because two actuators can supply 500lbs of force, does not mean that both can handle 3000lbs of static load. One might only be able to hold 250bs. So it comes down to finding the specs that are important for your application. Ordering from a surplus store that does not give you a brand or model to research could end up with the buyer getting a unit that is exactly, more, or less than what is needed for the intended application.
 

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Link to photo of 345 w/ Blade
I know that the Hayes tractor has an actuator on the rear for the sleeve hitch, but I believe what you see on the front is a winch. Perhaps he will chime in and explain.
 

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I don't know about cheap imitations. To me a cheap imitation is a product that falsely proposes to be equal to something else when in fact it is not.

I own two different linear actuators from Thomson. They are really good at publishing specs for their products I have found. I really like the spec that tells you how long (in number of complete cycles) their actuators will last. They rate them based on using the internal clutch, and based on percentage of rated load. I think this is really good information. This would be good to have when comparing similarly capacity actuators. Perhaps if you need one that only needs one to last 1000 cycles you might opt to purchase a cheapy. But if you want one that will last 50000 cycles you might be inclined to spend much more.

Thomson also makes multiple units that can apply the same amount of force under power, but can withstand widely different static loads. So just because two actuators can supply 500lbs of force, does not mean that both can handle 3000lbs of static load. One might only be able to hold 250bs. So it comes down to finding the specs that are important for your application. Ordering from a surplus store that does not give you a brand or model to research could end up with the buyer getting a unit that is exactly, more, or less than what is needed for the intended application.
Thank you for that detailed explanation.
 

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Don't mean to hijack this thread, but how do you tell a heavy duty actuator from a cheap imitation? I know next to nothing about actuators but know others on this forum have used them for various projects.
mbrun had some good advise.

Basically what I meant was don't buy a $35 actuator on ebay and expect it to hold up to this task. Either the ends will rip out or it'll strip out. :fing32:

If somebody mounted a coil to lift the pin up, then you could get away with a cheaper actuator. IE, put the pin lift on a momentary single throw toggle and the actuator on a momentary double throw actuator (so you can release the pin and move the actuator 'til it locks (taking the stress off of the actuator)). :drunkie:
 
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