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I often wondered if using steel conduit, used in wiring, might make a good frame with a little wire mesh to push leaves. Light weight to allow it to skim along the turf and allow manual lifting etc., but strong enough to push a pile of leaves without collapsing. Perhaps a "skid bar" of some material, maybe PVC bent up like a sled runner on each side, could be used to prevent digging in or catching on anything. Only thing I'd worry about is a stump or other immovable object busting the whole thing apart.

CAUTION: This is theory only, I have not built or attempted to build this. :tango_face_surprise
The theory is quite sound, Alien5044! I made one out of 2x2 wood lumber and expanded metal to see if it worked and it did for a while. It was just that the strength of the materials used and the mounting were not up to the rigors of the work.
It's quite a bit like that white **** that many of you are required to deal with each year around this time. Leaves are the same way, they are quite light as each one is almost nothing, but get a pile up and the weight increases dramatically. On a solid paved surface, the light material construction won't pose much of a problem. But on an uneven ground even the smallest earth clod can bend it.
 

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Discussion Starter #23

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Steve, have you tried plowing leaves with the existing plow blade? For your application, that might just work OK.

A few weeks ago we wanted to move an existing tree stand from where it was at to another location several hundred yards away. If we were to take the existing roads, if would have been at least twice the distance than going "as the crow flies", so I evaluated to see if we could cut a new trail.

I have a plow on one of my 4 wheelers and used it to push some downed trees(or portions of) out of the way and as I was doing that I also used it to plow leaves out of the (soon to be) path. At that time there was heavy leaf fall and a path was covered with leaves again if you came back a couple days later. I was not sure I would be there when the move was going to happen and was not sure others would find the path if it was not well marked so I actually plowed down to bare ground for the part of the path that was new. I was surprised at how well it pushed the leaves out of the way and after a few passes I had a leaf berm on each side of the path and it was easy to see even after a bunch more leaves had fallen and covered the ground. There were a few times when the blade caught on a root or something, but that is what the "trip springs" are for and they did their job.

You would not want to use the blade if you are concerned about damage to the ground, but for shooting lanes I would not think that would be much of an issue.

PS: The front mount for the plow on the 3000 Series does have a float position, although it only has a limited range of float. There are some pins and you have option to put a pin in the arms(Cub Cadet 703-3256 ARM-HITCH FLOAT)or above the arms. If the pin is in the arms it does not float, if the pin is above the arms it does float.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Steve, have you tried plowing leaves with the existing plow blade? For your application, that might just work OK.

A few weeks ago we wanted to move an existing tree stand from where it was at to another location several hundred yards away. If we were to take the existing roads, if would have been at least twice the distance than going "as the crow flies", so I evaluated to see if we could cut a new trail.

I have a plow on one of my 4 wheelers and used it to push some downed trees(or portions of) out of the way and as I was doing that I also used it to plow leaves out of the (soon to be) path. At that time there was heavy leaf fall and a path was covered with leaves again if you came back a couple days later. I was not sure I would be there when the move was going to happen and was not sure others would find the path if it was not well marked so I actually plowed down to bare ground for the part of the path that was new. I was surprised at how well it pushed the leaves out of the way and after a few passes I had a leaf berm on each side of the path and it was easy to see even after a bunch more leaves had fallen and covered the ground. There were a few times when the blade caught on a root or something, but that is what the "trip springs" are for and they did their job.

You would not want to use the blade if you are concerned about damage to the ground, but for shooting lanes I would not think that would be much of an issue.

PS: The front mount for the plow on the 3000 Series does have a float position, although it only has a limited range of float. There are some pins and you have option to put a pin in the arms(Cub Cadet 703-3256 ARM-HITCH FLOAT)or above the arms. If the pin is in the arms it does not float, if the pin is above the arms it does float.
Joel, my factory plow hitch is in bad shape but I think I can fab a mount for my loader arms and mount it. Float can be mechanical with a small piece of chain. I originally planned to use it with hay tines and casters.

I do plan on yard work with it as well. Still pondering on something like the factory leaf plow rake kit listed above by MyCraftsman
 

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IF you already have a loader look into a product called edge tamer by R2 manufacturing. I used them for pushing leaves last year. It works great but eventually the pile in front of the bucket gets quite large and heavy and pulls a lot of the grass up leaving bare paths. In my front yard where leaves were not as thick but turf is better I did not have this problem. My back yard is nothing but oaks and hickory. Very little sun and very little grass, lots of leaves.
 

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Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
IF you already have a loader look into a product called edge tamer by R2 manufacturing. I used them for pushing leaves last year. It works great but eventually the pile in front of the bucket gets quite large and heavy and pulls a lot of the grass up leaving bare paths. In my front yard where leaves were not as thick but turf is better I did not have this problem. My back yard is nothing but oaks and hickory. Very little sun and very little grass, lots of leaves.
That's very cool. I could fab that easily and quickly with scrap I have lying around. Our yards are the same. Back yard is 1/2 acre of nearly dirt as it's total shade, front yard is 2.5 acres of thick grass. Thanks for the idea.

How does it do around roots sticking up?
 

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Discussion Starter #28
So the wife and I cut a couple more trees in the back yard today and dealt with some of the leaves.

I was dragging some out with the box blade but it was not getting much. Put my old ripper bar on I had welded curved tiller tines on and started grabbing 3-4x as many. Pretty effective.
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20200202_115429.jpg
 
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