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Guys, we're talking bikes and riding for health. Let's not stray into what type of exercise is best. That topic should be started in a new thread, and with discussion, not argumentation.
 

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Granted, recumbent trikes & bikes look a bit strange to anyone that are more familiar with the DF upright bicycles. They are not new and have been around for many years. What very likely happened to slow their popularity was when in 1934, they were prohibited from racing with upright DF bikes because they were so much faster. Much less wind resistance and the power of the legs is used with greater efficiency.

Trikes are not great on hills but there are ways around that. Easiest thing to do is simply stop in place and there is no fear of falling over, even clipped into the pedals. Can't do that on any upright bike. My HP Gekko FX has an additional 3 speed rear hub that gives me 81 total gears. There are other options with that such as a Rohloff hub. Battery power is also easier to convert to since there are many places to mount the battery.
As many of you may have noticed, a trike is a bit larger than an upright DF bike. But many trikes fold in half and can be placed in the boot or trunk of even the smallest cars.

Many have found out to their great dismay that riding an upright DF bike for any period of time simply hurts. The saddles are narrow and HARD. Your wrists, elbows and shoulders take the brunt of the forces from any road imperfections and the neck begins to hurt because you have to bend it back and up to see anything. Those are the main reasons that many give up on riding a DF bicycle.

Recumbent trikes, on the other hand, take all that away. Many refer to them as mobile recliners as they are very comfortable even for hours upon hours. It really is like sitting in a chair as you are much more upright. Your hands simply rest on the handlebars and guide easily. Road vibrations do not travel up your arms. On my 2,600 mile tour there were many days that I did ride 8 or more hours. At the end of those days, nothing hurt, didn't have to stretch to get the kinks out. Even after my campsite was set up, I usually used the trike to sit on as it was much more comfortable than the picnic table.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
ApinNY,
I have a really nice Trek bike that I might just put a ekit on and get it off the garage wall but after I lose some weight. I have plans for it. my wife and I bought two nice Trek bikes for anniversary 15 years. I have a 45 mile commute to work my goal just a cut that down to 30 miles of driving and 15 miles of riding I can take a shower at work. with my physical condition and winter coming on that's probably at least a year out..

Flaken,
That was a very interesting story about you losing your house and then traveling across country on a trike.

I also have a terratrike but I have the external gearing like a bicycle. I've only been out on it six times since I bought it but I love it. this morning I loved riding at 5 a.m. no cars. I light up like a Christmas tree. I rode for 40 minutes this morning on back country roads all flat and I did not get passed by a single car. I don't think I would have the brass to commute on city streets but there is a bike path that goes right to my building that I work in.

The lady at the bike shop asked me what my goal was and I just said to get healthy and she said you will. the more you ride the more you feel better.

She's right even after just six times I can feel the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Granted, recumbent trikes & bikes look a bit strange to anyone that are more familiar with the DF upright bicycles. They are not new and have been around for many years. What very likely happened to slow their popularity was when in 1934, they were prohibited from racing with upright DF bikes because they were so much faster. Much less wind resistance and the power of the legs is used with greater efficiency.

Trikes are not great on hills but there are ways around that. Easiest thing to do is simply stop in place and there is no fear of falling over, even clipped into the pedals. Can't do that on any upright bike. My HP Gekko FX has an additional 3 speed rear hub that gives me 81 total gears. There are other options with that such as a Rohloff hub. Battery power is also easier to convert to since there are many places to mount the battery.
As many of you may have noticed, a trike is a bit larger than an upright DF bike. But many trikes fold in half and can be placed in the boot or trunk of even the smallest cars.

Many have found out to their great dismay that riding an upright DF bike for any period of time simply hurts. The saddles are narrow and HARD. Your wrists, elbows and shoulders take the brunt of the forces from any road imperfections and the neck begins to hurt because you have to bend it back and up to see anything. Those are the main reasons that many give up on riding a DF bicycle.

Recumbent trikes, on the other hand, take all that away. Many refer to them as mobile recliners as they are very comfortable even for hours upon hours. It really is like sitting in a chair as you are much more upright. Your hands simply rest on the handlebars and guide easily. Road vibrations do not travel up your arms. On my 2,600 mile tour there were many days that I did ride 8 or more hours. At the end of those days, nothing hurt, didn't have to stretch to get the kinks out. Even after my campsite was set up, I usually used the trike to sit on as it was much more comfortable than the picnic table.
This is what amazed me about a recumbent; no pain after the ride.

A little expected muscle soreness but not much.

I rode right into probably a 15mph wind with no problem this morning; on a Hybrid DF that was a real pain.

It feels like cheating a little. I've yet to see a down side. I don't feel like I'm working out and yet it is a great workout.
 

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Country1966, Trek makes very nice bikes and ebikes. Adding a kit is fairly easy. There are several manufacturers. 30 miles of riding every day will definitely take off some weight, even on flat roads.

Those recumbent seats look a lot more comfortable than the typical bike seat. I have a Shock Stop seat post on order through Kickstarter for September delivery. Hopefully, it will relieve some of the rear end pain that begins after about 20 minutes of riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Country1966, Trek makes very nice bikes and ebikes. Adding a kit is fairly easy. There are several manufacturers. 30 miles of riding every day will definitely take off some weight, even on flat roads.

Those recumbent seats look a lot more comfortable than the typical bike seat. I have a Shock Stop seat post on order through Kickstarter for September delivery. Hopefully, it will relieve some of the rear end pain that begins after about 20 minutes of riding.
I'd be interested in hearing how that works out. we bought extra large seats I bought memory foam covers for them and still after 15 - 20 minutes it starts to hurt. I think riding shorts help .

I weigh over 300 lbs so you figure that sitting on a little seat it doesn't take long for it to start hurting. once I get down in the mid 200 I'm getting the trek off the wall. Next year hopefully.
 

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One of the downsides of riding a trike is that you have to like talking to people, as everybody just has to know all about that strange contraption you are on. When I first began riding trikes, I was royally P.O.ed at the world since the working life (and the money) was, over. I had crushed the right foot in an industrial accident and broke a couple of bones in the midfoot. It's called a LisFranc type of injury and roughly 50% heal fine and 50% don't. I ended up on the don't side.
People will stop you everywhere and at almost any time they see you and the trike. Even in Denver, CO where biking is very popular, most have never seen a trike except on obscure late night sports channels or Youtube. Number one question is almost always, "did you build that?" For some strange reason, kids love the trike even after they find out the price. Usually the next question is, "can you get that at Walmart?" That one threw me at first as I had never shopped at Walmart preferring more upscale avenues.
But the thing you soon find out with a trike, is that it is no problem to just stop somewhere as you already are on the best seat in the house and chat.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
it's great that you found something to keep you mobile after that injury.

Yes I could see where that would be the case I got a thousand and one questions at work when I showed the pictures of of it to people.

I have to store it out in the barn because my grandson who's three and a half just wants to sit on it all the time.

He's a knob Turner if you know what I mean; loves to disassemble things.
 

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Guys, we're talking bikes and riding for health. Let's not stray into what type of exercise is best. That topic should be started in a new thread, and with discussion, not argumentation.
That really takes all the fun out of it. I enjoy off topic conversations as we learn about other stuff.

Some people only know how to argue...or get their feathers ruffled by anything.

Forums to me are the CB radio of the internet....a lounge if you will.

Some "channels"/forums are too wild and vulgar to hang out and get anything accomplished and some are too dry to be of any enjoyment.
A heated discussion can occur without being disrespectful or rude but I guess it rarely happens.

Tis life...
 

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There are plenty of places where folks can argue. Around here, we have discussions, and off topic means start a new topic in another thread. Nuff said. :tango_face_plain:
 
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