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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I figured out an Oil filter cross reference but has anyone had any luck with the air and fuel filters?
The closest Kubota Dealer is 50 miles from me.


Thanks

TM
 

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I've been buying my filters at NAPA with good luck. I think the fuel filter element may be the only one I needed to pickup at the dealer. Just tell them them your model number and they should be able to go from there. If I remember the Hydro filter was special order and I had to wait a day for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The Fram oil filter# is 3593A and any auto parts store like Advance or Autozone etc.. Can match up several other brands using that Fram#.I guess I will try NAPA for the air filter.


TM
 

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wow, I'd be kind of careful there, at least with the oil filter part ... I had the exact same idea and was looking for a nice Phram replacement that I could stock up on at Walmart for cheap that would still do a great job ... I talked with a couple people who are very knowledgeable about diesel engines (one was a Kubota dealer mechanic) and they both told me that was such a common mistake for people who don't really understand all of the differences between diesels and the rest of the world

apparently, one of the reason diesel oil filters are sometimes more expensive is that they have to withstand a much higher pressure and when you use a 'standard' oil filter it can split it and you can end up losing a dangerous amount of oil before you know it ... kind of like how you wouldn't ever use a regular oil filter for a hydraulic line filter because of the pressure

I've owned diesel vehicles before, and I definitely noticed that they have higher oil pressure, especially when they are cold or in winter when the gauge is usually pegged at the high mark when it's started for several minutes until it really warms up ... I can't imagine that a regular oil filter would not be overbuilt and be able to handle this, but apparently it happens a lot more than we generally hear about - from one mechanic's perspective, as far as engine problems/failures go, I was told that this was the second most common mistake after accidentally putting gasoline in a diesel fuel tank

I also know that Phram makes oil filters for diesel vehicles, but I'm not sure if they are the same part number as will fit on gas engines ... and even if they did, does that mean that the gas engine filter is strong enough to be used in a diesel, or does it just mean that they made all of that model filter 'diesel strong' just because some applications for that part number are diesel? ... it might not go both ways for those filters that don't have an 'approved' diesel application already in mind when they designed that model of filter

anyways - keep a close eye on that Phram filter, I'd hate to hear about someone blowing up a perfectly running D600 - that would be a crime against the Kubota gods for sure ... or maybe look up all of the applications that 3593A fits and see if it happens to fit any diesel vehicles ... if it does, you technically should be OK as long as the thread pitch and depth are right for the filter mount

unless someone knows the standard pressure range of the D600 engine in a Kubota G5200? ... maybe smaller utility-type diesels have insanely high oil pressure - I can't see why they would, but since I don't know, I'm not writing it off ... basically I'm just saying that you should really, really do some checking (from more than one source) before you put on a similar looking filter that fits just to save $5 or so - I know that you know that your G5200 is worth it

I'd love to hear more about this if you find anything out - I've just been getting dealer filters for my G5200 - it's a good excuse to climb on and check out all those cool orange tractors they sell there :) ... but I sure would love to be able to buy Phram oil filters for it if I could

about the air filter ... I have a K&N filter in mine ... it's a little taller than the stock filter, but it doesn't matter if the filter housing doesn't contact the baseplate because the only way air can get into the engine is through the filter ... I just happened to have a filter that was the the perfect size (just a little tall) and was still new in the box ... I believe (but am not 100% sure) the one I used was from a 1988 Pontiac Fiero Formula and was around $30-$40 like all K&N air filters ... they are cleanable
(a kit to clean them several times is less than $10) and have a lifetime warranty and will definitely be an improvement and not just a maintenance item - diesels LOVE their air for sure

if you have a larger auto parts store around you, sometimes they have a whole wall of K&N air filters and you can just bring your old one in and compare it to the ones you have based on the size of the box for starters - if I remember correctly, the K&N book at the store had them listed by size as well as part number, so you can just measure the wall-thickness, the radius and the height and then see if they have one (which you could reasonably do with standard air filters at Walmart as well if you were so inclined, just without the cool size charts K&N have) ... in my opinion, unless you just plan on selling that G5200, the $40 spent on renewable clean air for your engine is worth every penny and a good investment

as far as a fuel filter ... several companies sell 'remote oil filter kits' and they are designed to accept several different styles and part numbers of filters ... I'm very sure one of these could be adapted (via a couple simple pipe fittings) to use spin-on fuel filters .. they are made with either one or two filters - so if you want to have your fuel really clean for a longer period of time, you could double filter your fuel or add one of those spin-on fuel/water separators I've heard about or any number of things ... they probably sell a remote diesel spin-on fuel filter kit too, which would be something you might want to look at and might solve all of your fuel filtering problems at once - I'd guess you'd be looking at less than $100 for the entire kit and a few changes worth of filters and maybe 30-45 minutes install time with simple hand tools

at least if you put on a remote kit you will be using common, cheap, easy to find diesel fuel filters that are designed to be used for just that instead of trying your hand at fuel filter alternatives that just happen to screw onto the baseplate ... not that it won't/couldn't work of course, but there's a better chance of success with a remote kit IMO ... that, plus it will be ultra easy to change the filters with a kit since you can mount them anywhere

best of luck with this - I'll be watching to see how it all works out for you

also, if anyone has any ideas about the hydro filter alternatives, I'd love to hear about it ... that's the one I would like to find an alternative to the most
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the warning but I don't think your mechanics are as informed as they might like to think as there is virtually no pressure at all in the filter itself as its on the suction side of the oil pump. Most if not all pressure is created on the other side of the system when the oil comes out of the pump.The same is true of hydraulic systems the pressure is always on the discharge side of the pump the filter will be located on the suction side or low pressure side of the pump.Its kinda like the old Automobile service manuals that say use only Delco antifreeze or FoMoCo power steering fluid or Mopar
windshield washer solution.As far as going to the dealer to see whats for sale on the floor thats fine for someone who can actually afford to buy something off the floor.
As for me a poor man having only been able to buy one new automobile in my life the only thing on the floor I would be able to buy is 30 years down the road after the original owner fgures it's worn out and I buy it and bring it back to life.


TM
 

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I am just as much a penny pincher as any one but I will not put a Phram filter on any of my vehicles. There has been a number of discussions on the tractor forums concerning this subject. The vast majority feel and this was proven through testing, is just don't do it. You can do as you please but let it be know that there is a difference in filters. For what they cost they are fine I guess, but that just isn't good enough as far as I'm concerned. For two dollars more you can get a top quality filter. Just check the Micron rating of the filter you plan on using against what Kubota specs. and I think you might change your mind.
Anyway, enjoy your tractor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well I guess I really am a skin flint as I didn't use a Fram I actually cross referenced it to Purolator which was 25 cents cheaper.As for Fram though I've used them for years on muscle cars,trucks and family vehicles with no ill effects.I do know however that dealers will tell you not to use anything but OEM items only available from them just to get your business.If I had a Kubota dealer within a reasonable driving distance I might pay the extra cash for a Kubota filter but I can't justify driving a hundred miles round trip just to get one.
I also know that if a Kubota mechanic told the gentleman who posted earlier that a Fram or any other filter may split due to oil pressure it is simply not true as there is no pressure in the filter.I guess one could possibly collapse inward if the oil suction tube became clogged but not the other way around.Anyway what I was originally trying to find out has been obscured.I simply was asking if anyone knew of a cross reference for air and fuel filters.Thanks for the Wix link I will check it out.


TM
 

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OK, TRUE story. In 1969 a friend and I built a 55 chevy 210 for 1/4 mile drag racing. The 327 was built up and the car could pull both front wheels off the ground in second gear. The first time out we spun a bearing on #2 cylinder and figured it was a fluke. Sent the crank to be rebuilt and rodded the oil passages. The next time out the same thing happened and we decided to rod the crank ourselves. Guess what we found? There in the oil passage was a piece of our STP oil filter. It was a new filter both times. We cut the filter apart and the internal filter media was destroyed. I guess the Chev. high output oil pump was too much for it. We switch to a different brand of filter and no more problems. Needless to say I have never used an STP filter again. I don't even know if they are still available. The oil pump is considered a positive displacement pump. That means that the filter has to handle just as much oil volume whether it is located on the input or the discharge side of the pump. I've been running NAPA (Wix) filters for years with no problems.
Just my $.02.
 

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FYI, Kubota routinely installs their engine oil filters on the pressure side and in many cases theres a screen on the low pressure return to sump side.

re. oil filters. Like oil, oil filters can be a never ending debate as well as theres as many pros as cons at times. In any case it can lead to some interesting reading :D

I would like to interject that one can order and recieve OEM filters from Kubota dealers online or via a telephone call and have it sent to your front door.
One of our sponsors, www.messicks.com provides online parts ordering as well as others. May be worth checking out.
I use OEM myself but would probably use any major brand in a pinch. I have several Kubota dealers within easy driving distance so direct purchasing is my method and it also gives me a reason to check out whats new and talk alittle tractor :D

Due to my avg annual tractor usage I generally only R&R the oil & filters (oil & air) once a yr, so a buck or two doesn't effect me the way it may others.

Anyways, carry on sportsfans :D
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I agree everyone has some good points here but I know for a fact that a fram oil filter will not split due to high oil pressure on a 14HP diesel engine.Volume and pressure are two different things.Anyway when it comes to engines and the like its kinda like politics or religion its hard to find two people who agree.I guess I will just keep using my thrifty oil filters until I can see some visible proof with my own eyes that they are inferior.If and when
I do I will jump on the majority bandwagon.And by the way the Purolator filter#is L14459.


TM
 

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Ain't this a great country. We can still do what ever we want as long as the minority agrees with us. :fing20: I'm glad you have had good luck with your filters. My bad luck cost a bunch of money:crybaby: I'm sure Fram hasn't stayed in business all these years by not having any business. Out here the temps can get to -40 degs and I've seen the gaskets on oil filters blow out. What a mess when it's that cold.

Take care
 

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the thing that's funny to me about all this is that we're SO careful about everything that touched our tractors while (some of us) would use the same brand filter or oil or spark plugs or whatever in our cars without even thinking twice about it

I think caring for a 20 year old garden tractor more than a $30000 car or truck really says a lot about our members ... in a good way

at least if I ever want to buy an older garden tractor I know I could trust one from just about anybody on here through the for sale forums



FYI ... about the Kubota mechanic that told me about the filter problems ... he never said I should only use Kubota filters, just that I shouldn't ever use a filter that wasn't made for this application, especially because it's a diesel

I worked at an oil change place for a couple of years when I was a teenager (best experience for a teenager ever) and I saw several instances where the oil filter would come off of a car or truck all blown up like a balloon - I can remember more than one of them that was split a little at the seams and leaking ... it was obvious that there was a huge amount of pressure that caused it ... this happened more in winter and spring than any other time ... some of them were so distorted and mangled that we had to literally tear them apart with cutters until we could unscrew it properly

but I can also remember a POS Volvo with like a million miles on it coming in and me finding out that one of the motor mounts had long ago given out and just disintegrated and that half of the engine had been completely supported by the OIL FILTER instead of the motor mount ... we had to jack up the engine to change it and of course put a new engine mount while it was up ... it was an OEM Volvo filter and had not been changed in 20,000 miles, so who knows how long it was holding up the engine while it was torquing and vibrating?

one observation I came away with from there was which filters were strongest ... we crushed all of days filters with a manual crusher thing each evening when we closed, and the AC Delco filters always needed 2 people to pull down on the lever, and sometimes they looked like they would break the machine and we would just not crush those out of fear and respect ... while almost all of the other brands would crush like a pop can ... it was a repeatable experiment and happened to every AC filter we crushed, so I trust the data

does that mean that AC filters are the best? ... no, but I like to think that since they made the can so strong, they put some extra effort into the filtration elements inside of it, the way the O-ring seals do their job and the machining of the threaded siphon tube and maybe, just maybe the whole filter is good stuff

but since I've never had an oil filter burst myself, this is all just conjecture and hearsay from people that I asked - it's quite possible that personal experience is the only way to decide whether or not to go through with it ...


travlin-man ... thanks for that info, that's seriously good to know ... do you happen to know what standard operating oil pressure is on the 14HP D600 engine? ... I'd love to put a gauge on mine but haven't gotten around to it
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm not sure what the oil pressure is on a D600 either but I doubt it's over 50 lbs cold.I'm going to put a gauge on mine soon because I don't trust the sending unit and I don't see an idiot light on the dash anywhere so not sure how it's supposed to warn you of low oil pressure unless it shuts the engine down which I seriously doubt.


TM
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Well
I just found out the NAPA and WIX numbers for the air filter.And I found out the hard way I might add.The NAPA filter cost 31.46 tax included OUCH!
I now have the numbers of the fuel filter that goes in the canister near the front of the engine.Here is a recap of OIL,AIR and FUEL filters...

OIL Filters
Fram 3593A
Purolator L14459

AIR Filters
NAPA 6387
WIX 546387

FUEL Filters
Stens 120670
PrimeLine 702362
or 7-02362

Happy Filtering!


TM
 

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Thanks for the cross reference numbers travlin-man. Good information. I installed a kubota Z620 in Bolens GT2000. I used an ultra-bright red led in the dash for the oil pressure light. Shows up real well against the black dash. I hope I'll notice it before I would a guage.
 

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Thanks for the cross reference numbers travlin-man. Good information. I installed a kubota Z620 in Bolens GT2000. I used an ultra-bright red led in the dash for the oil pressure light. Shows up real well against the black dash. I hope I'll notice it before I would a guage. Anyone check the price on an airfilter from Kubota?
 
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