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Discussion Starter #1
Guys, I've searched through old posts for an hour and not found an answer: what is the correct paint color for the wheels on the riders? I'm pretty sure it's not Canvas White. Rattle cans are fine, I'd like something for the 816 wheels that matches my 18G.

TIA
 

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Old Iron Connoisseur
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I'm pretty sure it is just regular white. The wheels on my 76' 816 do not match the creamier white of the hoods to and motor cover. I just finally broke down and cleaned an extra set of rims up this week and started painting them. Have an old set of 23 x 10.50's to try on my tractor. Hoping they will eliminate some of the rutting in the yard as it is very soft around here. I'll go grab a picture of what I believe are original rims on my tractor next to the freshly painted ones in a minute on my way to the truck and try to post them up at some point today.
 

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Canvas white has worked well for me on both the 430 and 814. It looks good too.
But with Gravely colors in general, who knows.
It's possible that at some later point, Gravely may have received their wheels already pre-painted a universal plain white by their supplier(s). That's assuming that Gravely painted their wheels in-house along with the hoods and seat pans earlier on.
It's also possible that your wheels were re-painted in a plain white at the time the rest your tractor was re-painted.
 

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Looks like I was off. I'm not going to worry about the white on this set of wheels right now as I'm just playing around with wider tires and trying to determine if I like them or not. I would say the rims on mine were canvas white as stated above.





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Canvas white has worked well for me on both the 430 and 814. It looks good too.
But with Gravely colors in general, who knows.
It's possible that at some later point, Gravely may have received their wheels already pre-painted a universal plain white by their supplier(s). That's assuming that Gravely painted their wheels in-house along with the hoods and seat pans earlier on.
It's also possible that your wheels were re-painted in a plain white at the time the rest your tractor was re-painted.
Just thinking out loud. Gravely could have gone with a purer white on the newer all-red tractor wheels as they did'nt need to match the white with the (canvas) white color of the hoods/pans of the 400/800's anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Looks like I was off. I'm not going to worry about the white on this set of wheels right now as I'm just playing around with wider tires and trying to determine if I like them or not. I would say the rims on mine were canvas white as stated above.





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NICE PICS

Hey, looks like we both got the dozer lift rod from cogan ironworker, eh?

I think I may pull a wheel off one of the tractors and roll it over to the other to compare. In this case, my preference would be to match the wheel color to what's on my 18G, however, yes, it might look weird against the Canvas White fender....
 

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Pretty sure it varied as tracktortak has stated. My 400 series rims are the Alaska white (industrialtouchup terminology). However, if I were doing either an 800 or G series, I'd be tempted to try something like Kilz, mentioned in this article:

http://www.orangetractortalks.com/2...-job-part-2-frame-engine-transmission-wheels/

No first-hand experience with it. Looks flatter than I would like, so a clear coat may help.
 

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Old Iron Connoisseur
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NICE PICS

Hey, looks like we both got the dozer lift rod from cogan ironworker, eh?

I think I may pull a wheel off one of the tractors and roll it over to the other to compare. In this case, my preference would be to match the wheel color to what's on my 18G, however, yes, it might look weird against the Canvas White fender....
Actually bought an original ball and quick release setup for the blade after buying a teflon lubed hiem joint setup. Then had a friend turn a few more of the trunion blocks that go in the lift arm on his lathe. All in all.. I've got way more time in blade lift arms then I will ever have in using the blade! Not much need for one in Eastern NC.

This is the arm I had at first...


Jimmy
 

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Old Iron Connoisseur
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I'm putting a top coat on now.. figure I'll touch up after I install as need.
 

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I've painted the rims with a final coat, installed the tires and did any touch up with a small brush.

You could finish coat the inside of the rims (if you are going that) then install the tire, but don't set the beads. You can then mask off the tire, paint the rim, then once dry, inflate and set the tires.

I did something similar when I preserved a set of rims for my GRW. I did not want to dismount the 25 plus year old Goodyear's, so I deflated them, broke the beads, masked the tire past the bead and painted. It gives a much better look than just masking as close as you can to the tire/rim junction.
 

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Another easy way to mask off tires is to use a good coat of grease on the tires. Really lay it on about 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick. Prep the wheels for paint first, then apply the grease. Make sure to wipe it off the edge of the metal wheel where it is only on the tire. Prime and paint the wheels, and let the paint dry well. Then use the pressure or steam washer to wash off the grease. Works like a champ, we have been doing it on heavy equipment and military vehicles for years.
 

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I did the same as Ron. I pushed against the deflated tire at the rim, exposing a section of the bead. I then applied a short length of painters tape over the exposed section of bead. I continued doing this around both sides of the rim.
I then taped newspaper to the run-out of the tape that stuck to the tire.
I painted one side at a time. After painting, I removed the newspaper and all tape, including the "bead tape" from that side, again by pressing down against the tire at the rim, and removing as much tape as was exposed.
I did this while the paint was still tacky, so that the "bead tape" would come away from under the rim lip cleanly. I mounted them after they were finished. They all turned out well.
 

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I like the look of Rustoleum Appliance Epoxy spray paint in white. They also have Bisque and Almond colors, but I feel they are too tannish in color to suit my tastes. It's tough paint too. No priming required according to the directions. Just lightly scuff the old paint for better adhesion. If there is rust, wire brush/wheel the heavy stuff off and sand some. Then paint.

As for application, I deflate the tire, then unseat the bead from the rim just enough to slip some thin rags between the tire and rim. It takes a few rags because they don't turn without bunching up. Just lay them flat between the bead of the tire and rim. Repeat with ragging procedure around the tire until tire is completely covered. Paint 2 coats and let dry a day or so. Then repeat for the other side.
Here are some pics of my 18G I picked up this spring and have been doing some touching up to it. It shows the difference between the standard Gravely white(rear tires) and the Rustoleum Appliance Epoxy white(front tires).

Overall, the tractor was clean, but the previous owner had a battery leak acid all over the battery tray and dripped down to areas below. He then let it sit instead of washing with water and baking soda to neutralize the acid.
Needless to say, when I got it, rust had formed every place the acid touched. It had to be chipped off, wire wheeled, primed and painted. She looks almost as good as new now.

The rear seat pan was also painted with Gravely touch up and painted with 3 coats of clear laquer. It was then sanded with 2000 grit and buffed to a deep shine.

Just need to finish painting the rear tires and then get onto the deck. The deck is worse off than the rest of the tractor was. The previous owner beat the tar out of it.

The owner wanted $400 but I got him down to $350 because of the condition of the deck and the hydraulic leak back at the pump. He was a nice kid that didn't know what he had. He lived at home with mom and she wanted it out of the garage. I am thankful for his mother!

015.jpg 020.jpg

016.jpg 018.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I like the look of Rustoleum Appliance Epoxy spray paint in white. They also have Bisque and Almond colors, but I feel they are too tannish in color to suit my tastes. It's tough paint too. No priming required according to the directions. Just lightly scuff the old paint for better adhesion. If there is rust, wire brush/wheel the heavy stuff off and sand some. Then paint.

As for application, I deflate the tire, then unseat the bead from the rim just enough to slip some thin rags between the tire and rim. It takes a few rags because they don't turn without bunching up. Just lay them flat between the bead of the tire and rim. Repeat with ragging procedure around the tire until tire is completely covered. Paint 2 coats and let dry a day or so. Then repeat for the other side.
Here are some pics of my 18G I picked up this spring and have been doing some touching up to it. It shows the difference between the standard Gravely white(rear tires) and the Rustoleum Appliance Epoxy white(front tires).

Overall, the tractor was clean, but the previous owner had a battery leak acid all over the battery tray and dripped down to areas below. He then let it sit instead of washing with water and baking soda to neutralize the acid.
Needless to say, when I got it, rust had formed every place the acid touched. It had to be chipped off, wire wheeled, primed and painted. She looks almost as good as new now.

The rear seat pan was also painted with Gravely touch up and painted with 3 coats of clear laquer. It was then sanded with 2000 grit and buffed to a deep shine.

Just need to finish painting the rear tires and then get onto the deck. The deck is worse off than the rest of the tractor was. The previous owner beat the tar out of it.

The owner wanted $400 but I got him down to $350 because of the condition of the deck and the hydraulic leak back at the pump. He was a nice kid that didn't know what he had. He lived at home with mom and she wanted it out of the garage. I am thankful for his mother!

View attachment 117075 View attachment 117078

View attachment 117076 View attachment 117077
WOW, what a deal, and what a beauty! Great work!

:not_worth :not_worth :not_worth
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Do you guys have a tool to mount your own tires? The old tires on the cart were toast so we had them taken off at a shop. Sounds like you guys mount your own.

I guess I could paint the inside of the rim, then get the tires put on but not the bead? Then finish painting... maybe.

Thanks for the picture of the Rustoleum vs. the factory color, funny how it seems like the factory color is pure white but not quite.
 

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Great job on BOTH tractors. They look brand new. I like seeing that Ford blue too.
I would'nt mind having one just for the color.
 

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Do you guys have a tool to mount your own tires? The old tires on the cart were toast so we had them taken off at a shop. Sounds like you guys mount your own.

I guess I could paint the inside of the rim, then get the tires put on but not the bead? Then finish painting... maybe.

Thanks for the picture of the Rustoleum vs. the factory color, funny how it seems like the factory color is pure white but not quite.
Do I have tire irons? Yes. Do I ever use them? No. They are actually at my dad's shop right now. They work great on a 14" or 15" tire, but on a small rim I think they clutter things up. I find a large flat blade screw driver and some smaller ones are much more effective. Breaking them down just takes a bit of patience and since I always go ahead and take them off the rim, I find some PB Blaster, WD 40, etc on the bead as you start to open it up from the rim makes things much smoother. Once off a little clean up takes care of the mess. For painting with out removing you may want to just use water and skip the petroleum based lubes.
 

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Thanks for the kind words guys. I can't wait to go over the deck and spruce it up. I am curious to see how well the Gravely cuts grass compared to the Jake built Ford I use for weekly grass cutting chores.

As for tires, it's a question of where the bead is when you try to demount the tire. To unseat the tire bead from the rim, remove the shrader valve from the valve stem. Then I lay the tire down and stand on the bead with both feet stradling either side of the tire. I work my way around the tire and jump on it occasionally to unseat the bead. Don't get me wrong, it is work. After about 5 minutes, it usually unseats. If it doesn't unseat, there may be Fix a Flat in there which can make unseating difficult at best.


After the tire is unseated, I use a flat screwdriver and a rag trippled up to place between the screwdriver blade and the paint on the rim. This protects the paint from chipping. Liquid dish soap is a good lubricant to help with removal of the tire. Opposite where you place the screwdriver, make sure the bead of the tire is pushed down toward and into the center of the rim. There is a recess there that allows the tire to be pulled easily in the direction the screwdriver is prying. Once you have the tire bead started on the outside of the rim, work it around with a smaller screwdriver and rag. After about 1/4 the way around the rim, you should be able to slip your finger in and work the rest off with your fingers. This is where the liquid soap helps things slide along.

The key is getting that bead into the center of the rim where the recess is. If you don't, you are trying to stretch the bead over the outside of the rim and that just makes for a frustrating experience.

Installation is the same way. When most of the tire is around the rim, be sure the portion of the tire on the rim has the bead in that recess. I have worked tires back on the rim without tools provided the bead is in the recess and there is plenty of lube.

There probably is an easier way, but I have found this way works for me every time. Hopefully, you guys who want to try this won't be intimidated by the procedure.:goodl:
 

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Thanks for the kind words guys. I can't wait to go over the deck and spruce it up. I am curious to see how well the Gravely cuts grass compared to the Jake built Ford I use for weekly grass cutting chores.

As for tires, it's a question of where the bead is when you try to demount the tire. To unseat the tire bead from the rim, remove the shrader valve from the valve stem. Then I lay the tire down and stand on the bead with both feet stradling either side of the tire. I work my way around the tire and jump on it occasionally to unseat the bead. Don't get me wrong, it is work. After about 5 minutes, it usually unseats. If it doesn't unseat, there may be Fix a Flat in there which can make unseating difficult at best.


After the tire is unseated, I use a flat screwdriver and a rag trippled up to place between the screwdriver blade and the paint on the rim. This protects the paint from chipping. Liquid dish soap is a good lubricant to help with removal of the tire. Opposite where you place the screwdriver, make sure the bead of the tire is pushed down toward and into the center of the rim. There is a recess there that allows the tire to be pulled easily in the direction the screwdriver is prying. Once you have the tire bead started on the outside of the rim, work it around with a smaller screwdriver and rag. After about 1/4 the way around the rim, you should be able to slip your finger in and work the rest off with your fingers. This is where the liquid soap helps things slide along.

The key is getting that bead into the center of the rim where the recess is. If you don't, you are trying to stretch the bead over the outside of the rim and that just makes for a frustrating experience.

Installation is the same way. When most of the tire is around the rim, be sure the portion of the tire on the rim has the bead in that recess. I have worked tires back on the rim without tools provided the bead is in the recess and there is plenty of lube.

There probably is an easier way, but I have found this way works for me every time. Hopefully, you guys who want to try this won't be intimidated by the procedure.:goodl:
Fun is when you get mad at the rear tires ( 4.00/4.80-8 ) on a PM 20-G and yank them off the rims without any tools. And then put a new one on the same way. Both beads at once.:trink40:
 
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