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Discussion Starter #1
Hmmm
I switched to Amsoil synthetic Iso -46 SAE 20 compressor oil just about a year ago .
I have a 5 hp single stage V-twin 60 gallon compressor .
Can't say that I noticed any difference after switching but assumed the synthetic was better.
This year I wasn't going to change oil on the compressor as there wasn't but 20 hours use on it ,but because I was at the Amsoil booth at the state fair and had bought another quart I though I would.
Since there was about a quarter of a quart of oil left from last years change I was going to use that bottle first.
I was surprised to find the oil in that container was tea colored ,quite a bit darker than the lightly colored oil I had just bought.
The oil from last year was in the original Amsoil screw top container ,top on tight, and had been stored in a cupboard in my garage.
I was curious so I called Amsoil tech support to see what they had to say.
The tech support person told me that un opened the shelf life of the oil is five years.
Once opened the shelf life of the oil is one year.
He also said once opened moisture and sun start to break down the oil.
Then he REALLY surprised me by saying that this applies to all Amsoil oil products.
I'm taking that to mean that even if I ran my compressor for only ten hours in a years time I should change out the Amsoil yearly?
Does the "Up to eight times the service life of Mineral oil" slogan on the bottle mean only if the compressor gets heavy use?

I'm confused


Any thoughts Don?
 

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Greetings Imperialman67 !
One of the biggest issues with any oil that sits opened or unopened for a long period of time is the additives come out of suspension and drop to the bottom of the oil bottle or drum. Once they fall out of suspension they will not disolve back in. oxidation also begins due to the oil being exposed to oxygen. Several of the additives are heat activated, phosphorus and zinc anti-wear additives bond to the metal when the oil reaches normal operating temperature, they provide a sacrificial layer to prevent metal to metal contact in the event that the film of oil is ruptured. Additives in oil that see regular use typically do not come out of suspension as they would in the bottle When a piece of equipment is used regularly this is not much of an issue. The additive levels, and oxidation of the oil is typically checked when the oil analysis sample is tested.
If you have a piece of equipment that does not see much use, you may not be able to run Amsoil for as many years, compared to a highly used piece of equipment.
If you are in doubt, oil analysis will tell you the serviceability of the oil, and if the additives are at the level they should be.
Hope this helps !
Have a great day !
Don
 

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You may want to double check me on this, but what you are referring to as compressor oil is intended for an oil flooded screw compressor. It may be OK in your reciprocating compressor, but there is probably no advantage to using it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the input.
I thought I was improving/prolonging the life of my compressor by using the Amsoil. Guess not.
 
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