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Retired MTF Admin
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I was online this morning for a couple of hours. I visited about 3 of my normal websites, after which i ran my Anti-Adware scans.

Ad-Aware SE found 5 in my Registry Keys and Registry Values all High Risk!!

Ran my Microsoft Antispyware and it found 6 in my Registry!! They recommended that they be removed immediately!!

This is the first time in months that i have had any kind of Adware in my Registry Keys..There is one site that i always get a low risk Ad in my C:Files.

I do not know where they came from, but i thought i would pass this on to the members of this site....Ken N Tx
 

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I just tried a new spyware program called spy doctor 3.1 listed by pcworld on download.com...free and it found some stuff that spybot didn't.
 

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Retired MTF Admin
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Discussion Starter #3
I run Spybot also, it only found some when i first downloaded it about 6 months ago..The only reason i keep it is because it was free and who knows, some day it might just save me some trouble..
 

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Ratchet Jaw old Member
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Hey Ken ,
I just run MS scan , spybot ,and adware !!! Ms runs all the time , the last two finds spys every time . I dont know whats best , so I just use them all all the time. A computer repair lady told me that spybot and adware ARE spys, Someone on the late TF said she was pluged into the wrong port!!!!! ROF , Thats funny , I just keep my fingers crossed. Thanks Ken
 

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I ran spy doctor yesterday and it found 16 things none high risk then i ran ad-aware and it found 4 more things still not high risk.
 

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Member Extraordinaire - Deceased March 2017
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Ken N Tx said:
I was online this morning for a couple of hours. I visited about 3 of my normal websites, after which i ran my Anti-Adware scans.

Ad-Aware SE found 5 in my Registry Keys and Registry Values all High Risk!!

Ran my Microsoft Antispyware and it found 6 in my Registry!! They recommended that they be removed immediately!!

This is the first time in months that i have had any kind of Adware in my Registry Keys..There is one site that i always get a low risk Ad in my C:Files.

I do not know where they came from, but i thought i would pass this on to the members of this site....Ken N Tx
I certainly hope that SJs Valentine girl isn't considered a spy or we are all doomed. :beatdeadh

Durwood
 

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I've been using SpywareBlaster for quite awhile and have had excellent results with it. It keeps that junk off to begin with, so I don't have to run SpyBot or AdAware hardly ever. Just keep SpywareBlaster updated often with the option in the program, and it works great. It's FREE too. You can find it here: http://www.javacoolsoftware.com/spywareblaster.html

I also use and highly recommend CrapCleaner to clean up temp files, etc. It works great too and is also FREE! Get it at: http://www.ccleaner.com

With CrapCleaner, if you have a few cookies you do not want deleted, such as the one that stores your log-in in for this great tractor site, use the Options menu item in CrapCleaner, then select Cookies and move the ones you wish to save into the area to save them.

Both work great, go get them! :fing32:

Hope there's no typo's here. Broke my wrist last week and one handed typing isn't my cup of tea. :bonk:

- Rob
 

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:Welcome: Rob thanks for the links and i hope your wrist heals up quick.
 

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ROF ROF ROF

I found nothing, because I ran nothing, because I don't have nothing. :fing32:
 

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YUP! :rauch10:
 

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Funny! Number one link is from a software company that wants to scare people into buying their product. And the number two link just notes that they released some patches before the phishing problem became a big issue.

No OS will ever be 100% secure, but it's nice when an OS maker finds exploits and fixes exploits before they become a problem.

I agree there will be some nasties in time, but I doubt it it will ever be on the scale that you see with Windows. Wouldn't you think with the intense hatred of Apple, and hatred of the iPods success, that by now some hacker would want the first sucessful virus for OSX on his trophy mantle?
 

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I'll post another couple of links for you entertainment that are sort of a follow up to the Norton blurb. :00000060:

http://www.dvforge.com/virus.shtml

http://www.geeknewscentral.com/archives/003999.html

BTW, I found all these posted in the GRC.com security forum. There also is some links with stories questioning Mozilla and Firefox starting to show up more often. Most as you say by security companies. Never the less, best never to get too comfortable. Hackers love dares and challenges.

You Mac guys are a hard bunch to scare. ROF
 

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With my luck, I would have been victim in the 25K contest! :pcwiz:
 

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Some of your guys are living under a false sense of security -
Ducati

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Mozilla Patches Firefox Hole

Wed Mar 23, 4:00 PM ET Technology - PC World


Paul Roberts, IDG News Service

The Mozilla Foundation issued a patch this week for a previously undisclosed hole in its popular Firefox Web browser and is encouraging Firefox users to download the software update as soon as possible.


• Symantec: Hackers Turn Attention to Mozilla Browsers
• Mozilla Ditches Browser Suite
• Are Fewer People Switching to Firefox?
• Mozilla Warns of Firefox Security Holes
• Poll: Safari's Popularity Scorched By Firefox



The nonprofit organization released Firefox 1.0.2 (available as a free download) to fix a buffer overflow vulnerability in a Firefox feature for processing GIF image files. The patch is the second security patch issued in less than a month, but the foundation reassured users that the browser's open source platform is secure, and says it does not know of any active exploits for the hole.


The GIF processing hole was discovered by Internet Security Systems (ISS) and makes Firefox users who are running earlier versions of the browser vulnerable to buffer overflow attack, according to a statement released by the Mozilla Foundation.


ISS discovered the hole in a review of the Firefox source code, which is available on the Internet.


In a statement attributed to Chris Hofmann, the foundation's director of engineering, the discovery of the hole and release of a patch shortly after are evidence that the open source software model is safer and more secure than closed-source commercial code, because it is "scoured by thousands" of contributors, developers and professionals, and "not just the company's development team."

Cause for Concern?

In February, the Mozilla Foundation released Firefox 1.0.1 to fix 17 security vulnerabilities in Firefox, including changes to guard against spoofing of Web addresses and the security indicator on Web sites. However, the foundation is not planning to adopt a regular patch release cycle, which Microsoft uses, and will continue to issue updates as they are needed, Hofmann says in a statement.


Firefox has been gaining in popularity since the first full version of the browser was released in November. More than 27 million copies of Firefox have been downloaded since then, pushing Microsoft's Internet Explorer (IE) share of the browser market below 90 percent for the first time in years.


Firefox installations were 5.7 percent of the U.S. browser market as of February 18. IE controlled 89.9 percent, according to statistics released by Web tracking company WebSideStory.


However, Hofmann denies that Firefox is becoming a more attractive candidate for hackers as it gains market share.


"There is this idea that market share alone will make you have more vulnerabilities. It is not relational at all. Not being in the operating system and not supporting Microsoft's proprietary Active X are phenomenal advantages to us," he says in a statement.

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Are Hackers Now Gunning for the Mac?

Macs still have fewer bugs than Windows PCs, but Apple moves to plug security holes before problems crop up.

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Rebecca Freed, PC World
Friday, October 15, 2004
In early October Apple released a small series of patches for Mac OS X version 10.2 and later. Most of the fixes in this group blocked possible denial-of-service problems that are, to date, theoretical. For example, one addresses vulnerability in a Unix printing system that might expose passwords to hackers, in uncommon situations.

In the Windows world, no sooner is an OS hole publicized than someone writes a hack to exploit it. Since the last Mac OS X security update was the third in a month, and because some of the holes looked ripe for exploiting, I have to wonder whether the Mac is now attracting more unwanted attention from hackers.

According to Tim Bajarin, principal analyst with research firm Creative Strategies and a longtime Apple watcher, "The vulnerabilities unfortunately are inherent in the Unix world, and Apple's choice to build OS X on a Unix foundation brings with it this risk. Apple's move is more proactive: They are constantly testing the OS to catch any potential security holes before they become an issue. In that sense, they have gone to school on Microsoft's problems in this space and are making sure they leave no stone unturned in their quest to keep the OS as secure as possible."

"At the same time," Bajarin continues, "the media attention about Apple's OS being secure has clearly tweaked the interest of hackers, but as of now we have not seen any serious effort by the hacking community to deliberately expose any holes or attack the OS."

John Gruber, author of the Weblog Daring Fireball and another savvy Mac observer, thinks the recent spate of updates is just a small, short-term uptick, and doesn't indicate that the Mac is losing the high ground in the war against viruses, worms, and Trojan horses. On the Mac's reputation for being more secure than Windows, he says, "It's important to note that Macs tend not to get attacked, not that they can't be attacked. The vast majority of the fixes in Mac OS X security updates are in response to potential exploits, not actual exploits."

"And many of the fixes in typical Mac OS X security updates aren't Mac-specific," Gruber says, "but rather are updates to open-source components and tools. Apple has been diligent with regard to keeping Mac OS X's Unix layer up-to-date."

My take? This just means that Mac users have to keep their OS patched--like Windows users--but there's no cause for alarm. Apple has an automatic update service, just as Microsoft does for Windows. Using this service is the best way to keep your Apple software current.

The Unix-based nature of Mac OS X remains much more of a strength than a liability. Although it allows greater exposure, it also makes it likely that programmers can and will respond with fixes quickly.

Regardless of whether this tarnishes Apple's halo, the bottom line remains that attacks on the Mac have been vastly fewer than those on Windows. Most typical Mac users still have little to fear from the miscreants we Windows users have to vigilantly guard against.
 

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:1106: Spyware is something we all have got to get use to, it`s sad to say. But run as many program as you can Spy Bot is a good tool and spyware blaster goes right along with it. When you open Spy Bot to run the program you`ll see the word IMMUNIZE. Just click on it, the widow will change at the bottom of that page you`ll see a notice about javacools Spyware Blaster after installed [it is a free program] just click on it and it will block all known threats, they have a list and it keeps growing everyday. This is the link if anyone wants to add it to Spy Bot.... http://www.javacoolsoftware.com/spywareblaster.html
 

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One of my points is that OSX is pretty good about being patched or fixed before there is a widespread problem. I have an anti-virus program that I got free from being a dot-Mac member. I have a new machine about 3 weeks old, and I haven't given much thought about installing the AV on it. Not a big concern to me at this time.


I just keep my system updates current and don't click on anything stupid. I think that is good advice for everybody.
 

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"Some of your guys are living under a false sense of security -"

Not exactly...Some of us, because of our current choice of Brower (Firefox) or OS (Mac OS X), just have fewer minute by minute "bug" worries. It doesn't mean we are blind or do nothing about infestations on our computer. We ARE doing things..... like NOT using IE whenever possible... ROF ROF ROF ROF

Greg
 
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