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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone! My question pertains to both my John Deere L100 and Wheelhorse 212-H. My issue is that everytime I am towing some type of brush or topsoil in my garden cart, halfway up my hill my tires spin and the cart pulls me back down the hill! Sometimes it can be a little dangerous.... :(

What options do I have to combat this traction problem? Is there a certain PSI I should lower my rear tires to? Should I purchase different tires? (any recommendations?) I live literally on top of a hill and it is essential that I am able to maneuver around efficiently and it would be really nice to haul loads up and down from the woods :thThumbsU

What do you guys think?
:thanku:
 

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USMC
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Are you using turf tires? If so you could try some chains or change your tires out to HDAP's or AG tires for better traction. I would discourage you from adding weight to the L100 because of possibly over loading the transaxle. slkpk
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am using turf tires, and the Wheelhorse's are pretty worn down. Someday I would be interested in getting new tires for both tractors. Thanks for the tip on not adding weight to the JD, instead I will investigate tire options :)

Tire Recommendations?
Chains?
What about PSI?
 

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TECH Exchange Contributor!
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I would recommend Ag tires with wheel weights.
The wheel weights don't really put much strain on the transaxle as long as you don't spin (and stop) the wheels too fast.
I run my rears (turf) at around 6 psi when mowing. That gives a little bit of cushion for the bumpy ride.

Best bet though are the ags. You would be surprised how much grip they can get.
PO of my tractor had actually bend a few of the wheel bolts from the torque of the transaxle (Simplicity Legacy with low range)
 

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I agree that AG tires are the way to go, and that it would help to either load the tires or use wheel weights. The cheapest alternative, though, is simply to load the cart lighter and make more trips.
 

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Load the tires, add wheel weights and 2-link chains if required. None of this will stress the axle to any measureable degree and the increase in traction is significant. Also the chains have less tendency to tear up turf than ags. My GT wears chains 100% of the time with no detrimental effect to the lawn. If you are contemplating new tires, get them before loading liquid ballast.

Turfs are for firm surfaces and ags are for loose soft dirt or mud.

If the hill is fairly steep, add some weight to the front end. Increasing traction will tend to cause the front to lift from weight transfer when climbing hills.
 

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You didn't mention how big the cart is, how much load you are attempting to pull or how steep a grade is involved.

As was mentioned, the simple solution is to haul less load and stay within the limitations of your current setup. After that then more weight and better traction come into play.

Whatever you do, I'd sure suggest you don't continue to take those backwards slides down the hill. Way too much chance of damage to you and the equipment.

Think I'd opt for bigger equipment or smaller loads.

Mike
 

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Move the axle back on the cart or shorten the tongue (not ideal), either will put more weight on the hitch instead of "lifting" traction from the tires.

Adam
 

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Move the axle back on the cart or shorten the tongue (not ideal), either will put more weight on the hitch instead of "lifting" traction from the tires.

Adam
Just to add, you can pick up a LOT of extra traction with tongue weight. That's generally how guys on the forum get enough traction to pull their boats, travel trailers, ect arround. Don't get crazy with it though (maybe no more than 100lbs or so) because it can lift your front tires off the ground once you are on this hill. I just load my trailer a little more to the front than the rear and it works nicely.
 

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I went with 2-link chains & 80 lbs./wheel of wheel weights on the Wheel Horse 1055. It will pull any cart/trailer or do a wheel-stand trying; traction is a non-issue now! I'm partial to chains since I also use it in the snow a good bit; I find ags to be inferior to chains in snow & ice.

I'll add this... the WH is still running it's original hard-as-plastic turf tires that rolled it off the line in the mid 60s!
 

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Move the axle back on the cart or shorten the tongue (not ideal), either will put more weight on the hitch instead of "lifting" traction from the tires.

Adam
Adam's correct, and this method works quite well. Though if you go this route it puts the weight behind the rear wheels, rather than at the rear wheels like loaded tires and wheel weights. That can result in more lift in the front, so Tudor's advice about adding weight to the front would be good.
 

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The L100 is a lawn tractor, good for mowing and light towing. If you find you are routinely exceeding your machine's limits you need to move up to a bigger machine. IMO, you would be wise to move up to garden tractor such is the current JD X5xx series models or if you are on a budget find a nice used 318. You can add weight and lug tires to the L100 but it is still just a lawn tractor. The best advice previously posted was to load the cart lighter and make more trips. The bottom line is that it is the operators responsability to operate the equipment within the machines limits and you appear to be exceeding those limits.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you all for replying so fast!

Just to clarify:

1) My land is grassy and I do not intend to maneuver in mud/dirt.

2) The load in the cart is less than 150 pounds :( So its not like I am trying to move topsoil that has mounded in the cart hehe

3) I feel that the L100 should be able to pull the weight its just my tires slip halfway up the hill :(

*What kind of cart do you all recommend?
 

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Suggest using one with wheels that turn freely. I'm serious--when is the last time you greased your cart's wheel bearings or bushings? I'm speaking from experience here, as it's an item that's easy to overlook. I recently had a flat tire on my Craftsman cart, and noticed while repairing it that the wheels were very hard to turn when off the ground. Lubed them both up, and a difference of day and night.
 

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Turfs are for firm surfaces and ags are for loose soft dirt or mud.
I agree with that but I would add that ags work great in grass too. If your picky about your yard you probably wouldn't like the marks they leave.

I'm not picky. If I tear up my yard I just smooth it out and something always grows back.
 

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If I would you I would put some weight on the front of the mower too, You don't want to pull a wheelie on the hill!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for the advice! Just fyi my cart is homemade...haha made by my great grandfather back in the day. I'll have to check to see if there are even grease fittings!

I think it would be great to get ags...but I am concerned about them tearing up the yard.

Wheel weights hurt the trans axle?

Chains tear up the grass?

Thanks all!
 
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