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Hi All,

I was checking the pressure on my John Deere 2210's tires and discovered that the rear tires are apparently loaded with liquid ballast. I bought it used a few weeks ago and the previous owner said the tires just had air. Apparently he was confused, because I definitely was getting liquid out of them :)

It's a clear liquid. Methanol and water mixture, probably? I get liquid out of the tires even when the valve stem is at the 12 o'clock position.

At any rate, the rear tires feel a bit soft to me, and my pressure gauge only registered about 5 psi (the tires say max 20psi on the sidewall). But the odd thing is, the tires are not noticeably "squatty" or deflected where they sit on the ground.

I was just using a regular tire pressure gauge, not one designed for use with liquid--might it have given me a bad reading?

I've had no issues with the tractor and have put about 10 hours of use on it since we bought it. It's been driven on gravel and pasture 95% of the time, with just a time bit of use on pavement and concrete.

So from the searching I've done on this it sounds like the "correct" thing to do is to fill the tires to the sidewall pressure. Have I got that right?

-Josh
 

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I run mine at max pressure. I'm not looking for flotation, I need bite on hard packed snow. I carry enough weight to get the full width of tread in contact when necessary.

If you put air in, remember that there is less volume of air in those tires than there is in the front tires. A little air will have a big effect on tire pressure.

If the liquid is clear, give it a sniff for methanol. Calcium has a different feel to it if you get it on your fingers and has a slight milky appearance in small quantities.
 

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IMHO, if liquid comes out at 12 O'Clock, it's overfilled and you can bleed some off.

Just use the thumb test for pressure if the gauge won't read it because it's liquid. Put the amount of pressure you want in the front tire to get the feel for how hard it is under your thumb, and compare the rears to that.

It's not like it's a high performance race car that needs to be properly balanced for good handling in the turns.
 

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IMHO, if liquid comes out at 12 O'Clock, it's overfilled and you can bleed some off.

Just use the thumb test for pressure if the gauge won't read it because it's liquid. Put the amount of pressure you want in the front tire to get the feel for how hard it is under your thumb, and compare the rears to that.

It's not like it's a high performance race car that needs to be properly balanced for good handling in the turns.
If liquid does not come out, the fill level is much less than 75%. I fill mine to just above the outside of the rim for a fill level of 80 - 84% and have done so for the last 3 decades with no negative results other than a firmer ride.

A difference of 2 psi will result in tilting the tractor by as much as 0.5", depending on the pressures and tires involved. When mowing the lawn, that much tilt will show as a very ragged cut. A better method is to measure from the ground to the top of the rim so that both tires have the same rolling radius (axle to ground height). Then the mower and other attachments will be level to the ground and to the tractor. Different brands of the same size tires can result in different rolling radiuses with the same pressure.

I have different brands of the same nominal size tires on my grass cutter and the pressure difference to level the tractor is either 7 or 9 psi, I can't remember which at the moment.

Once you have measured and made a note of the height of the rim above ground at your desired pressure, you can check the pressure with a measuring tape and get it right every time, whether it is fluid filled or not.
 
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