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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Cub Cadet snow blade mount/pivots at the front of the tractor.

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I have friends that tell me the rear axle mount is a better system.

Well I got this blade with a tractor purchase and it does not currently fit anything I own.

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I figure if I fab some rear mounts I will find out it a rear mount will work better.

So far I have made some rear brackets to attach to the rear axle.

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Also, I made some other parts I think will be necessary.

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After I took the photo, I decided the formed brackets to attach to the flame cut brackets were too flimsy.

I flame cut some heavier ones.

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I hope this works!!! :praying:
 

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Holy crap, this is an endeavor for sure! I applaud your ingenuity! Watching this closely!
 

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the good is mounting to the rear axle you have a stronger mount than just at the front .....the bad is that just like Gravely's mount it passes UNDER the front axle . You lose the lift height since you can't raise higher than the bottom of the front axle.

On early truck mounts they ran a sub frame underneath the truck to spread the force but the plow still pivoted under the front bumper you you still had the lift height.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
the good is mounting to the rear axle you have a stronger mount than just at the front .....the bad is that just like Gravely's mount it passes UNDER the front axle . You lose the lift height since you can't raise higher than the bottom of the front axle.

On early truck mounts they ran a sub frame underneath the truck to spread the force but the plow still pivoted under the front bumper you you still had the lift height.


My first measurements of the Gravely blade show I will have about the same clearance under the blade as with the Cub Cadet blade, - 6 inches.

That is what I am hoping for. :praying:

So ground clearance should not change under the blade.

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This part is 1" thick.
The 1" and 3/4" holes are torch cut.

The 3/4" hole is where the blade should pivot.
 

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Have you see how a Wheel Horse snow blade mounts. It fit between the frame and has slots with latches to hold the blade in place. Here is a tread that shows it.
http://www.wheelhorseforum.com/index.php?/topic/30338-rear-axle-hitch-question/
The original Wheel Horse hitch is located on down in the tread.
You have already built the axle mounts adding the slots and latches and spreader bar and you will have it.
 

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Where'd you get metal that thick from? And your cuts look very precise - did you make the cuts with oxyacetylene?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Where'd you get metal that thick from? And your cuts look very precise - did you make the cuts with oxyacetylene?
Had the metal,

I built the cutting machine,

It uses oxy - propane.

I can hold tolerances in the .005" to .010" range.

It cuts at 90 degrees well under a half degree accuracy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well, the blade is under the tractor, the brackets are on the axle.

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There is a 1" pin connecting the two brackets together.

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Now I got to work on getting the tractors manual lift connected to the blade.

This blade and mounting system is extremely rigid compared to the Cub Cadet blade and bracket!!
 

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I have a wheel horse 1055 with that rear axle mounting system; my only issue is when loading it onto my trailer, as the blade catches on the ramp. I've been pondering the notion of building a sub-frame from the rear mounts to the front, then using a front pivot system to lift the blade. I'm thinking the sub-frame could use the existing front end mount for the mower deck in addition to the rear axle mount so that it would be a tool-less R&R.
 

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Everything looks very well done ,but if it were me I would add a support brace from the lowest point on the new axle brackets up to the frame (think triangle ) .You have just added a lever that is going to put several hundred pounds of force on the axle and this extra brace will help transfer the loads to the frame in a second spot.

If you get a chance I would love to see the set-up used to get those perfect looking holes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Everything looks very well done ,but if it were me I would add a support brace from the lowest point on the new axle brackets up to the frame (think triangle ) .You have just added a lever that is going to put several hundred pounds of force on the axle and this extra brace will help transfer the loads to the frame in a second spot.

If you get a chance I would love to see the set-up used to get those perfect looking holes.

You can see the machine used to make those holes here:

http://www.sweetmk.com/
 

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Everything looks very well done ,but if it were me I would add a support brace from the lowest point on the new axle brackets up to the frame (think triangle ) .You have just added a lever that is going to put several hundred pounds of force on the axle and this extra brace will help transfer the loads to the frame in a second spot.
Isn't it the axle that is driving the blade whether it is frame or axle mounted? He is eliminating the frame being between the force applied and where it is used. I think your idea has merit as a brace may stabilize the bracket mount on the axle. The advantage here is the force of the axle when pushing snow or dirt is directly transferred to the plow and not lifting weight off the front axle which a front mount does, which makes it able to steer properly, and the forces are not transmitted through the frame. Disadvantage is on some setups the plow cannot be lifted as high off the ground as a front mount and the frame under the tractor removes some of the ground clearance. My opinion but for plowing snow from a driveway the ability to steer more effectively offsets the disadvantages.
-Scrump
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Everything looks very well done ,but if it were me I would add a support brace from the lowest point on the new axle brackets up to the frame (think triangle ) .You have just added a lever that is going to put several hundred pounds of force on the axle and this extra brace will help transfer the loads to the frame in a second spot.

If you get a chance I would love to see the set-up used to get those perfect looking holes.
Actually, I will have to think about that a while.

My initial thoughts are;

1) I want the forces transmitted to the frame minimized, that is one reason for the axle mount.

2) The new 1" thick brackets are supported to the transmission, the 1" pin that goes under the transmission rests against the transmission.
If the brackets came loose, the 1" pin will carry the load.

3) The only reason I can see for a brace is to reinforce the transmission-frame connection to offset the wheel torque. I do not believe my mount is increasing the load on that connection of 6 bolts (3 on each side).
The transmission is pushing forward, the blade pushing backward.

The brackets act as a lever (because the blade mount holes are located below the center of the axle) offsetting the drive torque of the axle, further neutralizing the forces on the frame, one of my initial goals.

IMHO, but, I will think about it more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The blade is on,

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And it goes UP!!

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The new blade has the same 6" of ground clearance as the Cub Cadet blade I took off.

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If it stops raining, I will give it a try.
 

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Isn't it the axle that is driving the blade whether it is frame or axle mounted?



-Scrump
You are correct that the axle is still doing the work, but the parameters have changed so must the mounting system of the axle. It was designed to transfer the load through the frame and then through the attachment point of the axle. The frame has now been eliminated as a load path and the axle has to deal with the new increased load using a design that was meant for something else.

All I am saying is that 2 simple braces triangulated up to the frame would now stop the rotational forces induced by the new plow mount and not cause any uplift in the frame that would hinder steering.
 

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3) The only reason I can see for a brace is to reinforce the transmission-frame connection to offset the wheel torque. I do not believe my mount is increasing the load on that connection of 6 bolts (3 on each side).
The transmission is pushing forward, the blade pushing backward.

The brackets act as a lever (because the blade mount holes are located below the center of the axle) offsetting the drive torque of the axle, further neutralizing the forces on the frame, one of my initial goals.

IMHO, but, I will think about it more.
IMHO the forces would have to be in equilibrium all the time. The force on the plow equal to the torque induced by the wheels causing 0 reaction would be a very rare thing. It will be a constant back and forth situation with one be greater than the other at most times. The force applied by the plow will be multiples greater than the drive torque of the axle can apply when plowing snow. Just think when it is icy out you will have alot of wheel spin which will negate the drive axle torque , but you will still be able to plow several hundred pounds of snow that is a constant load against your mount.

The stock upper axle attachment points might be robust enough to handle the new loads , but to think your not inducing a substantial new torque load is quite optimistic and I doubt the original engineers designed the axle mounts to take this into account.

I hope this has helped because that is my onlyl intent
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The mounting has turned out to be ridiculously strong!!

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I have 8+ hours of pushing dirt, mulch, compost and brush as test time. Sorry, no snow yet.

The mower lift points were used to do the blade lifting.

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The rear axle mount offers much better steering while pushing, no more front wheel lift!!
 

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Two points to ponder.

1. With the pivot at the rear axle below the axle center line, wheel torque is transferred to the frame at the axle to frame mounting points. A pivot directly on the line between the axle centerline and the cutting edge will reduce that torque dramatically. Think impact loads when plowing at speed.

2. If you dog leg the push bar directly under the front axle, you can raise the blade higher. There is a lot of free space under the existing setup at that point. By using half of it, you should be able to gain quite a bit more lift. Ground clearance at that point with the blade down is of limited advantage. Some mods to the plow mount and lifting point will be necessary.
 

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You are correct that the axle is still doing the work, but the parameters have changed so must the mounting system of the axle. It was designed to transfer the load through the frame and then through the attachment point of the axle. The frame has now been eliminated as a load path and the axle has to deal with the new increased load using a design that was meant for something else.

All I am saying is that 2 simple braces triangulated up to the frame would now stop the rotational forces induced by the new plow mount and not cause any uplift in the frame that would hinder steering.
Chris, the objective is to take the frame completely out of the equation for any purpose other than to keep everything in proper relationship with each other.

Your idea has merit only if you can't direct the forces directly to the axle centerline.
 
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