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Have been reading this forum for the year I have had my 48 8N and have received a lot of help with various problems. I have encountered a problem that I want to share in the event it might help someone else down the road. Last fall I had brush cut for several hours and then put the 8N in the garage. At that point it seemed to be running fine. About 10 days later I attempted to start it and what I had was a start at very low rpm and would not take any throttle at all. I then went through those things I knew how to do: plugs, points, condenser, coil, rebuild carb, and even redid the governor. At that point it still wouldn't start although it seemed to want to. I put it away for the winter and fortunately this Spring I hooked up with a Gent who seem to have N series tractors in his blood stream. Owned 50 and overhauled 100. At this point the tractor seemed to want to start but wouldn't quite do it. It was noted that it was blowing gas out the air intake at the carb. My friend suspected a serious timing issue and took it to his shop. After checking the timing gear, pulling the head to check valves and found no real issues he put it back together but nothing changed in terms of starting. Almost at the euthanasia point he suddenly noticed that there was really no noise coming from the exhaust. He broke the connection at the manifold and tried starting it. Ran like a watch. He put up to 175 psi compressed air and nothing came out the exhaust. 100% blockage. This Gent is 70 years old and worked as a mechanic for 35 years and he stated that this was the first time he had ever encountered this problem. In reading some of the posts in the forum I noted several that had problems with gradual loss of power. Another area to look?? Hope this helps someone someday.
 

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Ya know it is always the last thing you look at that fixes them, the exhaust pipe is NOT one of the places you would normally look. THANKS for reminding us that the out pipe is just as important as the in.
 

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This should be one of the first places to look at. Mice and rats get into the smallest openings and built there nest and store there food. Plug up all your openings before storing tractors for the winter. If you forget to unplug something you will quickly know at startup.
I had a 9n that had a cracked manifold so not thinking I gabbed a good manifold off the shelf in the barn and installed it on the tractor. Started it up and wouldn't run too good. figured maybe the gas was a bit old and added some new gas. Tried adjusting the carb. After about 5 minutes of running started to smell like burnt popcorn. The mice had got into some of my chicken feed and had loaded it up with craked corn. Took me a little while to clean it up but ran good after that. Kind of gives a new meaning to using corn for fuel.
I've got a lot of tractors so I don't give my tractors name like some people do but after that this tractor was always known as Popcorn.

Kirk
 

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Used to be a more common probelm back in the 60's and 70's when a lot of the cars used twinwall pipes. The inner walls would close in, and restrect the flow. Cant remember the make... maybe Chevy... but one week I was helping out my stepdad at his gas station, and he had three with the same probelm that week. I remember at the time he said he normaly ran into it every few months.
 
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