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Having a new die grinder with cutting wheel I was looking for something to cut. So I decided to cut open the oil filter I had replaced on the JD LT150. It has a 15 Hp Kohler Single engine. The filter was in operation all last summer which is about 30 hrs run time for it. I buy the JD maintenance kit each year and this is the filter that comes with it. It looks to me to have both bypass and anti-drainback valves. The rubberband in the first picture is only to hold the assembly together when I laid it on the scanner. (My camera does not do well with close-ups.)





In this photo I fliped the parts to show a different angle from the photo above.

 

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Glad you posted this.....it jogged my memory of something similar I wanted to do bvut have not gotten around to it. My JD GX335 is due for a oil change shortly.....and I have a replacement Purolator brand filter I am going to use. This motor also can use the Toyota Camry 4 cylinder filter, which I usually always buy as they are good quality and the price is right......I also have an original JD filter, that is used but I saved for this project.......and I also picke dup a el cheapo Fram.......So what my intent was, is cut the Fram, JD, Purolator and Toyota filters apart, compare construction internally and measure filter media surface area.........just like the fellow did on that oil filter site about Mopar something or other......


What you need to do now, with that handy dandy die grinder is cut apart the element itself, count the pleats in the paper, and then stretch it out and measure the surface area......Then if you get ahold of say anaother brand filter do the same and compare.....

I have always used AC/Delco filters in my GMC pickup........they always had a thicker steel case, and seemed like a better filter from what I was told........but once I cut one apart and compared to a Fram equivelant filter, and the Fram had a lot more surface area than the Delco did........and I always hear Frams are junk.......but in this case it was better made than the Delco, and unless cruching the canister is a problem (which it should not be) heavier gauge steel does not matter here as it does nothing for filtering.
 

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memmurphy

My questions about your post has nothing to do with filters. Hope that is OK.

How did you get all the oil out of your used filter?
What are you using for a scanner?
What if anything did you cover the filter parts with before you scanned? (I assuming that it wasn’t the lid on your scanner.)

Your scanner is doing a outstanding job. Great pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Chip..
Sounds like a plan. We can compare surface area. I was suprised to see all metal parts with the exception of the valves after looking at the pictures at the link John posted.


John..
I thought I had the oil drained out of it until I cut it half open then rolled it to cut the other side. I was cutting it on the treated wood steps to the storage shed. Lets just say those steps won't be absorbing any rain for a while where I was cutting it open. I tried a few photos with my camera but they turned out blurry. When I backed up so it would focus, the parts were too small to see well. So I decided to try the scanner. I wiped all the oil out I could with a rag. Then I sprayed it with Simple Green Cleaner. Let it soak for a few minutes then washed it out with hot tap water. I still had to clean some smudges off the glass on the scanner when I was done. That is the lid over the top of it. I tried sheets of white paper but it looked kind of funny. I ended up just holding the lid up a bit with my finger while it scanned. I put the tallest part (the can) at the front. Lid is hinged at the back but is easily removable by sliding the hinges out of their holders. I tried it without the lid or anything but that produced a black hole behind the parts. The scanner is an HP Scanjet 2400. You can see a picture and specs. here. http://www.officemax.com (Type "scanjet 2400" in their search box.) I bought mine at the local OfficeMax store. I have been very impressed with it and the software that came with it considering the low price. The software can make Adobe pdf files like the Sears engine manual I posted. I've only had it a few months so I don't yet know about it's durability.

*edit* corrected bad link
 

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Mark, that was interesting, I wondered how well made the JD filters were as I buy them from my dealer too. Whats more interesting to know is the filter ( AM125424) that fits your LT133 with the Kohler is the same one I use on my L120 with the Briggs 20HP v-twin.

Thanks for sharing :)
Jim
 

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:ditto: Great pics, Mark. :fing32:
 

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memmurphy

Thanks for the info. Great job on scanning the filter. You are braver than I am. I would never have put a cut open used oil filter on my scanner. Now that you have shown me the way, there is no telling what I'll try. Again your pictures are great.

P.S.
Be careful using those steps to the storage shed, especially on rainy days.
 

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Yep, it takes some doing to put an oil filter on the scanner.......I have a hard time getting my scanner good and clean so I would be very hesitant myself. I used to use my scanner as a camera all the time prior to the time I finally bought a digital camera.....It works pretty darn good, and often times much better than the camera.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I did further dissection today on the filter. There was an epoxy type substance holding the filter material to the steel rings. So to get it out and see how long it was, I had to cut the material just above the epoxy. There were 56 pleats. When stretched out it measured 54" inches long. There was approx. 3/4" of an inch material exposed between the epoxy holding it.

54" x 3/4" = 40 1/2" square inches surface area. or approx. equivalent 6 1/3" x 6 1/3" piece of material. See picture below.

 
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