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Discussion Starter #1
My brother bought a 9N Ford tractor with a overhauled engine from a sheriff deputy but I dont know the condition in the overhaul.
I dont have much access to the tractor due to time constraints on my end & the distance between our homes so when I do see the tractor its all in a reactive measure for when its having issues.




Ive come to realize the oil (in the metal canister that contains the filter element) will drain back down to the pan (no ADBV) when the engine is off, which leads to a extended dry start period.




Has anyone seen/know info on upgrading this oiling system in a reasonably way?



Im considering rerouting the oil line up above the oil filter canister & looping it (sorta like a P-trap/sink trap) to retain the oil in the canister.


I dont know if there is a component that is missing to stop this drain back when it was originally designed.

Thanks for any incite


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I don't know the details of that oil filter assembly, but from the parts drawing it doesn't look like there's any kind of anti-flow back valve. I don't think routing it up like you're considering would help though. If it's all oil with no air gaps in the line then it will siphon from the higher level in the filter canister to the lower level in the sump regardless of the path of the tubing. A siphon works based on the difference in air pressure between the two levels of the end points regardless of how high or low the tubing in between is routed. I don't know how many thousands of 9N, 2N and 8N tractors are still out there this many years later and if the oil draining back was a problem then there wouldn't be near as many of them out there today still running. If it bothers you that much, then you could add an in-line check valve, just make sure it's rated for enough flow to match what the existing system creates.
 

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The L-Head engine gets its lubrication from the crank shaft splashing oil not from the oil filter. That design has worked for this engine since way back in the 1920's why try to change it now?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My brother notes that after sitting for a day or more the engine will make a knocking sound (not spark knock) at 1st start up & at idle, he notes if he revs it up the knocking will go away sooner.

I had him to check the canister to see if it had oil in it & there wasn't (oil drained back into the pan).
I told him that if its not getting oil then reving it up to get it is not the solution.

Im not familiar with this oiling system
so where is the oil going that is filtered (other than the oil gauge)?

Im just trying to find a solution to a issue, not re-engineer fords line of tractors.

Thanks for any incite
 

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The filter on the old N tractor is a bypass filter, it is NOT in line with the lubrication passages that feed the crankshaft and cam. There is a better than average chance the problem is a cracked pickup tube on the oil pump. Not enough that the pump will not pickup the oil but enough that it will allow the oil to drain down from the pump.

The bypass filter system scavenges a very small amount of oil from the same line that feeds the oil pressure gauge and sends it back to the governor housing to provide a bit of splash lub. To see how small of an amount of oil passes though the filter take a look at the stem the filter fits over, you will see two VERY small holes. That is it, that is all the oil flows though to get back to the governor housing. Note that the oil enters the filter housing from the side and exits from the bottom of the stem.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok cool.
I'm not sure what has been modified (if any) from original system but from what I recall is theres a metal line coming from the lower pan area that runs up to the side (lower side) of the canister & then a line attached to the upper side of the canister, splits out to the oil gauge & also a fitting on the back top side of the block.
I'm noting this as I have no clue if this is correctly routed.
I understand now that this isn't the main oil supply to the engine.

This past Spring I noticed someone had braised the pickup tube together (I'm not sure if this is a standard practice from the factory or if it was a repair) but I will be checking this pickup in the coming months when he drops the pan again.



Thanks for any incite
 

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Pickup tubes are silver soldered but many have been brazed to make repairs. As I recall before Ford standardized the return to the governor some of the early ones (that did not have the filter from the factory) did drop back to the oil pan.
 

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The oil is pumped to the top of the canister and gravity fed threw the filter to the oil pan. Anyway what oil actually gets there. As mentioned before not all the oil passes threw the filter.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I believe he is using 20w50 or 15w40.

I'm confused as to the comment "pumps to the top" because the side (of the canister) nearest the feed side (from the pump) the fitting is at the bottom of the canister (from what I can recall).

Picture of what I was referring to as a repair attached below.
 

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I believe he is using 20w50 or 15w40.

I'm confused as to the comment "pumps to the top" because the side (of the canister) nearest the feed side (from the pump) the fitting is at the bottom of the canister (from what I can recall).

Picture of what I was referring to as a repair attached below.
That is an ugly repair...

Oh and after looking at some notes, the early tractors that came from the factory with filters did return to the oil pan and was later changed to the governor housing.

The oil comes to the filter housing from a tee in the oil pressure gauge line. The line from the tee goes (well is suppose to go) into the fitting on the upper side of the canister. the bottom fitting is (again suppose to) return the oil to the engine. Now IF it was done as an add-on to the tractor the individual that installed it may have routed the lines backwards. For the filter to properly filter, as much as it is going to, it should be corrected to be in on top and out on the bottom making available more filter surface area.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I do now believe I may be looking (& referring to) the "feed side" incorrectly.

So the feed comes from the T fitting thats mounted on the upper/back side of the block. Splits off to the gauge & down to the upper fitting of the canister.
If so (also as my understanding from your post) then it should be run correctly.

He noted it does have a governor.
I believe he said its a 43 yr model
 

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They all had a governor, just some did not have the oil return to it and if it is how you described then it is run correctly.
 
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