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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

Had a horizontal woodsplitter with a pooched B&S engine given to me today. Everything was in good working order yesterday until the engine gave out. The PO has more money than patience so he bought a new one at the big orange box store.

My question is, can I hook up the hydraulic lines for my backhoe to the valve on the splitter? Will it work? Will it do any damage to my 646? I'm not very hydraulically savy, so I wanted to ask the experts.

Thanks in advance.
 

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i would get some more lines added to it with quick connects so it's easy to hook up if you don't know what your doing with hydraulics pay someone the lines can have thousands of psi in them that can mess you up real quick
 

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Hello all,

Had a horizontal woodsplitter with a pooched B&S engine given to me today. Everything was in good working order yesterday until the engine gave out. The PO has more money than patience so he bought a new one at the big orange box store.

My question is, can I hook up the hydraulic lines for my backhoe to the valve on the splitter? Will it work? Will it do any damage to my 646? I'm not very hydraulically savy, so I wanted to ask the experts.

Thanks in advance.

There's a few things here that give me pause for concern.

1. Your loader/backhoe has no proper provision to connect attachments. Anything along those lines is going to be kinda mickey mouse. I suppose if I was going to do this, I'd put the bucket curl cylinder on quick couplers so it could be totally unhooked from its supply lines. I could then stretch out the hoe, disconnect that cylinder, hook new lines to the bucket couplers.

You would have to use a bungee cord on the lever that controls that cylinder to keep it wide open at all times because you want to be able to use the valve on the splitter to control the splitting action.

All you would have to do is to remove the existing gas engine, hydraulic pump and oil reservoir. New, long hoses that are rated at 3000 PSI working pressure and are 1/2" in diameter would be needed to connect the splitter valve to the backhoe.

No harm will come to your hoe.

What may be evident is splitter speed. Many of these splitters use a 2-stage pump that pumps a high volume amount of oil at a low pressure initially to retract the ram and to push the ram against the log. But once the splitting action starts, the pressure rise causes the pump to go into its second stage of putting out low flow at high pressure. No such feature can be found on your hoe but you can use engine speed to control the flow rate.


2. IF you go ahead with this, then totally drain the splitting cylinder of oil. When you first use the splitter, then operate the cylinder in one direction, top up the reservoir on you hoe with the correct weight of motor oil, run the cylinder the other way and top up again as needed. Don't contaminate the hydraulic system in your hoe with the oil remaining in this splitter.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
There's a few things here that give me pause for concern.

1. Your loader/backhoe has no proper provision to connect attachments. Anything along those lines is going to be kinda mickey mouse. I suppose if I was going to do this, I'd put the bucket curl cylinder on quick couplers so it could be totally unhooked from its supply lines. I could then stretch out the hoe, disconnect that cylinder, hook new lines to the bucket couplers.

You would have to use a bungee cord on the lever that controls that cylinder to keep it wide open at all times because you want to be able to use the valve on the splitter to control the splitting action.

All you would have to do is to remove the existing gas engine, hydraulic pump and oil reservoir. New, long hoses that are rated at 3000 PSI working pressure and are 1/2" in diameter would be needed to connect the splitter valve to the backhoe.

No harm will come to your hoe.

What may be evident is splitter speed. Many of these splitters use a 2-stage pump that pumps a high volume amount of oil at a low pressure initially to retract the ram and to push the ram against the log. But once the splitting action starts, the pressure rise causes the pump to go into its second stage of putting out low flow at high pressure. No such feature can be found on your hoe but you can use engine speed to control the flow rate.


2. IF you go ahead with this, then totally drain the splitting cylinder of oil. When you first use the splitter, then operate the cylinder in one direction, top up the reservoir on you hoe with the correct weight of motor oil, run the cylinder the other way and top up again as needed. Don't contaminate the hydraulic system in your hoe with the oil remaining in this splitter.

Good info. :thanku:

Rather than connecting the splitter to one of the backhoe pistons, can I hook it to the main lines from the tractor to the backhoe? This would allow me to put the quick connects between the tractor and hoe. If it is feasable, it should eliminate the bungy cord on the lever. (Speculative?)

My hope is to park the tractor in a strategic position, set the bucket and downriggers safely, then disconnect the lines to the hoe and connect those lines to the splitter.

If this is possible, I will most likely move forward. If problematic, I'll look for a new engine for the splitter. A woodsplitter implement sounds like a cool thing to have though!
 

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what about finding a b&s for $50 on CL and swap it out?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
castoff, the model is 646-75 and s/n 9718849.

jpdocdave, I would love to be able to use the tractor for something other than digging and bucketing. While the loader and backhoe are very handy and desirable implements, they are often too cumbersome to use the tractor around the house. Basically, I'm just looking for other uses for my tractor.
 

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The hoe is nothing more than a sophisticated attachment but nonetheless it is an attachment that has oil delivered to it and then taken away just like any other attachment. So, if you prefer, there is no reason why you cannot put it onto quick couplers PROVIDING.....you choose couplers that are rated to pass 10 GPM when connected. You do not want to put in a pair of el-cheapo couplers that will restrict oil flow entering and leaving the hoe. That would slow down the hoe speed as well as create unnecessary heat.

You MUST have the engine turned off while disconnecting and reconnecting these couplers and cleanliness is paramount. Just make sure that all fittings used are sized correctly and are rated for hydraulic use.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The hoe is nothing more than a sophisticated attachment but nonetheless it is an attachment that has oil delivered to it and then taken away just like any other attachment. So, if you prefer, there is no reason why you cannot put it onto quick couplers PROVIDING.....you choose couplers that are rated to pass 10 GPM when connected. You do not want to put in a pair of el-cheapo couplers that will restrict oil flow entering and leaving the hoe. That would slow down the hoe speed as well as create unnecessary heat.

You MUST have the engine turned off while disconnecting and reconnecting these couplers and cleanliness is paramount. Just make sure that all fittings used are sized correctly and are rated for hydraulic use.
I am a Engineer/Surveyor for a highway and bridge contractor with quite a pile of heavy equipment. All of our excavators are Cat or Volvo and most of them have the quick couplers to change buckets. I'm not sure if they make the size that I need, but that is the quality I would go after. I completely agree with your warning about cleanliness, quality and safety. Thanks again.
 

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I am a Engineer/Surveyor for a highway and bridge contractor with quite a pile of heavy equipment. All of our excavators are Cat or Volvo and most of them have the quick couplers to change buckets. I'm not sure if they make the size that I need, but that is the quality I would go after. I completely agree with your warning about cleanliness, quality and safety. Thanks again.
There is nothing stopping you from choosing a low cost coupler for 3/4" hose and using simple plumbing bushings to allow the 1/2" threaded hose fittings to fit. Just use a decent quality thread sealing paste. I do not use teflon tape and neither do a lot of other hydraulic guys.

As long as the couplers will easily flow 10 gpm then they will work fine.
 

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Castoff,

Do you have a brand name recommendation? I tried some of the Permatex hi temp thread sealant and wasn't happy with the results.

Thanks
 
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