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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to the forum and new to heavy equipment. I have A Ford 555 Backhoe not sure what year or if it’s 555 ABC or D if there is such a thing. Anyways I change the head gasket and put a new radiator and water pump. Been sitting overwinter I’ve been higher elevation in New Mexico by Colorado. Started it up with all the old fluids in it After the head gasket and everything was installed. Turned it off seem like it ran fine. Went to drain the oil and noticed that tons of coolant was pouring out with it. As I filled the radiator more I noticed every time I feel that it kept coming out of the oil. Not sure what’s happening here. Anything helps thank you guys.
2499658
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Yellow Automotive engine gasket Automotive exterior
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Yellow Automotive engine gasket Automotive exterior
2499659
 

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Hi Dontknowmuch and
2499660
...the only thing I can think of is maybe you did not seat the gasket correctly ...unless the old coolant did not have enough anti freeze in it and you have a crack somewhere in the block..but I don't think it would start if that happened
 

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Anyways I change the head gasket and put a new radiator and water pump. Been sitting overwinter I’ve been higher elevation in New Mexico by Colorado. Started it up with all the old fluids in it After the head gasket and everything was installed.
What condition was the engine and cooling system in when you got the tractor? Did it have coolant in it prior to replacing the radiator and water pump? Did it run prior to replacing the head gasket?

I would pull the oil pan to see exactly where the coolant is coming from, but that's tough to do since the cast oil pan is part of the structure and it has studs or bolts coming in from the front through the bolster (front axle support) as well as the standard bolts going up from the bottom.

To identify the exact model look on the under side of the right side hood panel to see if the foil sticker is still there. If it is there, post the numbers on the sticker back here and we can help with the identification. The 3 key numbers are also stamped into the flat spot that faces upward on the transmission bell housing just above where the starter engages the flywheel, just where those 3 power steering lines disappear out of sight in the bottom right of your first picture. From the looks of that area in your picture you have several layers of dirt, grease and oil to clean off before you will be able to read them.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Dontknowmuch and View attachment 2499660 ...the only thing I can thing of is maybe you did not seat the gasket correctly ...unless the old coolant did not have enough anti freeze in i and you have a crack somewhere in the block..but I don't think it would start if that happened
Thank you for the welcome! Yeah I was thinking that too but remembering back I can honestly say the gasket was perfect when I put the head back on. I mean it’s got to be a pretty big whole somewhere As I am pouring in the coolant or water now at this point, it just comes straight out of the oil drain plug. I think it’s flowing way too fast for it to be a crack or the gasket. Could it be the water pump?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It actually ran really good
What condition was the engine and cooling system in when you got the tractor? Did it have coolant in it prior to replacing the radiator and water pump? Did it run prior to replacing the head gasket?

I would pull the oil pan to see exactly where the coolant is coming from, but that's tough to do since the cast oil pan is part of the structure and it has studs or bolts coming in from the front through the bolster (front axle support) as well as the standard bolts going up from the bottom.

To identify the exact model look on the under side of the right side hood panel to see if the foil sticker is still there. If it is there, post the numbers on the sticker back here and we can help with the identification. The 3 key numbers are also stamped into the flat spot that faces upward on the transmission bell housing just above where the starter engages the flywheel, just where those 3 power steering lines disappear out of sight in the bottom right of your first picture. From the looks of that area in your picture you have several layers of dirt, grease and oil to clean off before you will be able to read them.
It actually ran really good when I bought it. I noticed the oil had a little water in it but I only ran it for short times around the property. The motor sounds great actually and there was no weirdness just may be a lack of power. I just noticed it started steaming a little bit out of the radiator within a few minutes of running it so that’s when I decided to check the head and replace the gasket. Are used the big expensive repair manual I bought. Torqued everything down to spec. It’s flowing way too fast for it to be a small hole or a gasket leak. It’s literally pouring out of the oil pan drain plug as I’m pouring it into the top of the Radiator. Could it be the water pump?
 

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I agree with Mark. The water pump is driven by a belt and there is no direct way for coolant to get into the crankcase from the water pump. When the water pump bearings and/or seal go bad it leaks coolant out the front around pulley shaft or the front weep hole or both. There has to be a crack in the casting between the water jacket and the crankcase, or else the new head gasket is incorrect for that engine and has an opening between a coolant passage and an oil passage.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What condition was the engine and cooling system in when you got the tractor? Did it have coolant in it prior to replacing the radiator and water pump? Did it run prior to replacing the head gasket?

I would pull the oil pan to see exactly where the coolant is coming from, but that's tough to do since the cast oil pan is part of the structure and it has studs or bolts coming in from the front through the bolster (front axle support) as well as the standard bolts going up from the bottom.

To identify the exact model look on the under side of the right side hood panel to see if the foil sticker is still there. If it is there, post the numbers on the sticker back here and we can help with the identification. The 3 key numbers are also stamped into the flat spot that faces upward on the transmission bell housing just above where the starter engages the flywheel, just where those 3 power steering lines disappear out of sight in the bottom right of your first picture. From the looks of that area in your picture you have several layers of dirt, grease and oil to clean off before you will be able to read them.
 

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Looks like the leading D is missing from the Model number. It would have been before the F on the part of the sticker that's missing. All of the 555's (plain 555, 555A, 555B, 555C, etc.) started with DF. DF2 is a plain 555 (no suffix letter) made from late 1968 through 1978. The full model number, DF211F means that it is a 555 with a diesel engine, not PTO, and a torque converter auto reversing transmission with 4 forward and 4 reverse gears.

The Tractor Number (serial number) C553987 is a 1977 serial number. The C at the beginning means that it was assembled at the US assembly plant.

The Unit Number, 7K14B, says that it left the assembly line on October 14 1977 during the day shift.

The rest of the numbers are date codes for when the major components were assembled:

Engine - 7J01A - September 1 1977 midnight shift
Transmission - 7J13C - September 13 1977 afternoon shift
Rear axle - 7H25B - August 25, 1977 day shift
Hydraulic lift and Hydraulic pump both being *** means that it didn't have a 3 point lift system when it left the factory. The loader and backhoe hydraulics were separate from the 3 point lift.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hi Dontknowmuch and View attachment 2499660 ...the only thing I can think of is maybe you did not seat the gasket correctly ...unless the old coolant did not have enough anti freeze in it and you have a crack somewhere in the block..but I don't think it would start if that happened
It has guide pins and everything looked good and clean when we put it back together. It started right up and knocked for a minute and then ran smooth after that. The oil was super gummy. Should I have change the oil before starting it after the head gasket was installed? Would taking off the water pump do anything?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Looks like the leading D is missing from the Model number. It would have been before the F on the part of the sticker that's missing. All of the 555's (plain 555, 555A, 555B, 555C, etc.) started with DF. DF2 is a plain 555 (no suffix letter) made from late 1968 through 1978. The full model number, DF211F means that it is a 555 with a diesel engine, not PTO, and a torque converter auto reversing transmission with 4 forward and 4 reverse gears.

The Tractor Number (serial number) C553987 is a 1977 serial number. The C at the beginning means that it was assembled at the US assembly plant.

The Unit Number, 7K14B, says that it left the assembly line on October 14 1977 during the day shift.

The rest of the numbers are date codes for when the major components were assembled:

Engine - 7J01A - September 1 1977 midnight shift
Transmission - 7J13C - September 13 1977 afternoon shift
Rear axle - 7H25B - August 25, 1977 day shift
Hydraulic lift and Hydraulic pump both being *** means that it didn't have a 3 point lift system when it left the factory. The loader and backhoe hydraulics were separate from the 3 point lift.
Thank you for the information!! Sorry I couldn’t understand if it is just a plain old 555 or is it a 555D?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I agree with Mark. The water pump is driven by a belt and there is no direct way for coolant to get into the crankcase from the water pump. When the water pump bearings and/or seal go bad it leaks coolant out the front around pulley shaft or the front weep hole or both. There has to be a crack in the casting between the water jacket and the crankcase, or else the new head gasket is incorrect for that engine and has an opening between a coolant passage and an oil passage.
2499728
 

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The engine might have a regular oil pan that can be removed (as in, it's not also used as part of the tractor's frame). You might consider removing it, and seeing where the coolant is getting into the oil (perhaps via inspection camera, or even just by pouring in some water (why waste coolant) and see where it comes out.
 

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I've never seen a Ford Industrial tractor made after 1964 where the oil pan wasn't made of cast steel and wasn't attahed to at least the front axle support as well as the engine, and most were also attached to the front of the transmission as well.
 

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Just because the site where you bought the gasket kit says that it's the correct head gasket doesn't necessarily make it true. Did it have the same holes as the old head gasket?
 

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Were some of the O rings in that gasket set to be inserted in holes in the head gasket?
If they were, those are very easy to knock out of place when setting the head back down on the block if it not set down perfectly. Something that can be very hard to do standing in an awkward position with something as heavy as a head.

For the way you are describing how the coolant is pouring straight through it almost has to be getting from the coolant passages to the push rod passages on oil filter side of engine.

I have also seen several diesels that the wrong bolt length in some holes could mean a cracked casting in one place or another.

I have done gasket jobs that required thread sealant on certain bolts to seal the coolant system.

I went to the website you bought the gaskets from.
In the fine print it mentioned that not all gasket sets are complete since part of the set may be dealer only items.
Your service manual did not call for O rings or any parts that were not in the gasket set did it.

I do not know anything about your specific engine, just throwing out dumb stuff I have run into on other engines that can reach out and bite you.
 

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Sad to see your having trouble with your 555... I wish I could help more, but these guys seem to have you looking in the right direction. We have a 1986 655A that has been a great unit, although different from your 555 in a handful of ways.
 
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