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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering what owners of 4X5 tractors did in the winter to keep the mower lift arms up when they are snowblowing or snowplowing. Some arms are supposed to have spring-loaded j-pins that you hook to the other arm to keep them up, but other's have stop-bolts in this locations. Both serve the purpose of keeping the mower deck from rising too much, but the stop-bolts (like I have on my 455) do nothing to keep the mower lift arms from dropping in the winter when the deck is off.

I suppose letting the arms drop may not be a problem but I don't want to do it - I want them up and out of the way.

I would appreciate hearing from owners of 4X5 series tractors about this issue. :thanku:
 

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USMC
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Lift the arms all of the way up and then use the deck setting knob to lock it up. slkpk
 

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Have Dog - Will Travel
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Not over thinking, but maybe over cautious. My 445 did not have the j-pins either. So, as a bit of over cautiousness, I ran a zip tie through the hole in the draft arm and another in the frame and zipped each draft arm tight against the frame. I also used another zip tie to tighten the long end of my chains in tight. My chains always had 5 or 6 links past the connector link, and in a tire spinning circumstance would clank on the underside of my fenders. It was just quieter, and maybe even a little safer to have them secured. So, I keep an assortment of zip ties in my garage for things like this that duct tape or JB Weld are not the perfect solution for.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Jere - yeah, cable ties were going to be my solution too. Never thought to use them on tire chains though, then again, never had loose chains on my old Cub Cadet.
 

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Deere Guru
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1. Lift arms all the way up
2. Rotate deck gauge so they are all the way up.
3. Turn the lock-out valve to isolate hydraulics.

If you don't life them and use the gauge the set them at the highest setting, even if you have the lock-out valve turned, they will drop over the winters months eventually.
 

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1. Lift arms all the way up
2. Rotate deck gauge so they are all the way up.
3. Turn the lock-out valve to isolate hydraulics.

If you don't life them and use the gauge the set them at the highest setting, even if you have the lock-out valve turned, they will drop over the winters months eventually.
Good to know when I put the snowplow on mine a couple weeks ago I raised the arms all the way up then turned the lockout valve in and figured they would stay there. Mine is the older model with the j-pins and I will hook them in next time I am in my shop. You can learn something on here everyday. Thank's BILL
 

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I say zip ties if you really dont want them moving, letting them move freely seems to keep them in good shape for summer (personally I just let them raise and lower without probelm)

And you can "better" use the height adjustment knob to float the blower when you need all the weight on the front wheels for turning... and always float it at the same height...

just my take...



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Have Dog - Will Travel
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FWIW, My tractor always spend a good bit of time in the woods dragging firewood out through the winter, and I have always been paranoid about the lift arms sagging at exactly the wrong time vis a vis a rock, log, or frozen earth rut.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
And you can "better" use the height adjustment knob to float the blower when you need all the weight on the front wheels for turning... and always float it at the same height....
Hmmm.....What does the mower height adjustment wheel have to do with raising and lowering the blower? The height adjustment is a simple mechanical stop for the mower lift arms. Or am I missing something? :dunno:

Oh, and this hydraulic valve you speak of - does every machine have one? Is it located near the external ports?

Thanks to all.
Tom
 

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Tom I am not sure if the lockout valve was standard equip. on the 455 it was an extra on the 425. If you have one it will be on the side of the valve body under the foot rest a small T handle valve. When turned in it stops hyd. flow to the rockshaft cyl. and sends the flow directly to the upper two hyd. outlets to improve cycle time. MXZRXP is reffering to the way his 345 lifts the plow or blower which uses the rockshaft cyl and mechanical linkage just a different setup than used on the 4x5 series. BILL
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Bill,

I don't see a lockout valve on my machine. However, coincidentally, I have it in for a full going-through at the dealership (only because I acquired it in May and want Deere to make sure everything is as it should be, thereafter I'll maintain it myself) so I stopped by to ask about the cost of installing a lockout. They looked at me like I had 6 heads and 3 of them were spouting water. I will probably call them and tell them to nevermind, and I'll do it in the spring if I don't like the hydraulic snowblower performance this winter. However, since I'll have the mower deck arms locked up and the 3 point hitch down stop set high I think I should be fine. I'm sure I would feel differently with an FEL, so if that comes my way someday I'll do it then.

Thanks for your help.
Tom
 
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