My Tractor Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Guys,

I’m in the process of landscaping and have 10 loads of material (Fill) I have to be spread out. The question I have is regarding the use of 4WD while using the loader. I typically engage the 4WD when doing loader work because it allows for easier digging into the pile of material, but, in light of a recent post (http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=82883), I’m wondering if I should be using it because of all the weight on the front axel and the constant turns I do with a full bucket. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

GC
 

·
USMC
Joined
·
19,146 Posts
I use 4WD when running into the material or digging and haven't had any problems. I also use 4WD on my hills. Just don't run your 4WD on pavement unless there is snow or ice on it. slkpk
 

·
9K+ Poster
Joined
·
12,160 Posts
I would use 4WD when you need it for safety and traction, and not when you don't. If something wore a little quicker, I'd rather that happen then joining the upside down club.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
643 Posts
Other then on pavement my stuff is in 4x4 all the time. Her at the acreage or out at the farm.
Ditto....I use 4wd probably 80% of the time with loader work. Never on hard surfaces or pavement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
What type of material are you working with? Usually you can take your bucket and pull back and down the material from the top of the pile to help loosen it up and keep your pile in one place. Then you are just driving in and scooping up a nice easy bucket full of material each time. Just don't try to drive straight into the packed pile to get a scoop every time and you shouldn't have any problems using 2WD. Depending on the curcumstances, if you really need 4WD to do the work, you may be pushing the machine hard. Loosen the material first.
 

·
I Love All Color Tractors
Joined
·
22,321 Posts
I don't have 4WD, so there isn't much choice there.

I used to constantly wish that I had 4WD, but I got to thinking about it more. I wanted 4WD do that the loader will dig into whatever, easier. I don't use the loader for heavy work unless I have the BH on it for ballast anyway. I just take the extra time to loosen up whatever it is I'm working on with the BH and then use the loader on the now loose material. Why stress the loader and the machine by trying to dig virgin material with the loader.

I do wish I had it for those slippery and muddy situations though. On the other side of the same coin, 4WD can made a person more brave than he/she should be on a tractor though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,360 Posts
JD official instructions state:

Carry Materials Safely

Be sure anyone operating the loader is aware of safe operation and potential hazards.

See the tractor Operator's Manual for safe operational practices.

Do not exceed lift capacity of loader.

Be sure tractor is ballasted correctly.

Carry load low at all times.

If tractor is equipped with 4-WD, be sure it is engaged during loader operation.

Stop loader gradually when lowering or lifting loads.

To help prevent loss of control, do not use "FLOAT" position to lower loader.

DO NOT HANDLE ROUND OR LARGE SQUARE BALES. The loader is not approved for bale handling attachments.

Avoid handling loose or shiftable loads.

Reduce tractor ground speed when traveling over rough ground or when making turns.

Drive slowly through gates and doors.
 

·
Great Site Good People
Joined
·
6,656 Posts
I use 2WD while cutting on flat surface and roads and pavement and 4WD
the rest of the way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
Hi

I don't use 4wd unless I am having a traction problem and start to spin in 2wd. I find that 2wd works fine for moving loose material like freshly dumped fill, soil or gravel. If you have 600lbs or so on the back as ballast the traction is usually fine in most cases in my experience. I have the industrial tires on mine and they are good on rough terrain. If you have turfs it may be a different story - not sure on that.
If you need to make a lot of sharp turns on hard surfaces I suggest you try 2wd and the other suggestions above that make loading the bucket easier.

Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,360 Posts
keep in mind that if you don't run in 4wd, your braking is only on the rear wheels. Unless you're moving light stuff like mulch, even with a ballast box the rear end is not heavily planted. Moving fill, soil, gravel or any other heavy material - when going down a hill and applying the brake will very quickly make you realize why you should use 4wd when using the loader.

4wd locks the front axle to the rear one, thus connecting braking power to the front wheels when applying the brakes.
 

·
I Love All Color Tractors
Joined
·
22,321 Posts
Very good point Wally. Being required to think gets a lot of people in trouble from time to time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks all for your replies,

I think I’ll keep the 4WD engaged.. I’m moving clay fill and, even with about 800# ballast (don’t have loaded tires) my rear is still a little light with a full bucket. As wally2q said, breaking might be an issue

I can’t really “break up” the pile as it’s sitting just off the driveway on a slope. I’m working on grass and gravel so the front wheels do have the ability to “slip”.

CG
 

·
Great Site Good People
Joined
·
6,656 Posts
keep in mind that if you don't run in 4wd, your braking is only on the rear wheels. Unless you're moving light stuff like mulch, even with a ballast box the rear end is not heavily planted. Moving fill, soil, gravel or any other heavy material - when going down a hill and applying the brake will very quickly make you realize why you should use 4wd when using the loader.

4wd locks the front axle to the rear one, thus connecting braking power to the front wheels when applying the brakes.
Never thought about this. Good point.:trink39:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
We are moving product with the tractors every day, the rule of thumb I tell the guys is four wheel drive unless you are on pavement, using 2 wheel drive on a clients yard moving for example top soil, just tears up the clients property too much.

Andy
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top