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My project of the "Sidekick" http://www.americanspeedster.com/ is going to have an electric wheel. The guy was offering the Sparrow motor as the largest and most powerful. Know the guy says that they have changed from a brushless motor to a better motor and wants to know if i want the 36 volt motor or the 48 volt motor. I have no idea as to which one i want. Would the 48 volt have more torque and thus have more hill climbing power? Is there a bunch of battery info i should learn about? Is the 36 volt battery better than the 48 volt? I emailed the guy i need more education but he has not replied.
thanks for looking.:thanku:
 

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The sparrow is a Crystalte Hubmotor.

http://www.electricrider.com/crystalyte/sparrow.htm

There is a ton to learn about the motors, but the 450W hubmotor in my e- bike goes pretty well on a 36V LiPo pack. 11 AH. I mention the AH, because that is where the longeveity of the pack resides :)

Volts, 36 V vs. 48 V , I have not run a 48V one just yet, so I cannot really comment there. :dunno:
 

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I like golf cart batteries, they have the best power delivery per $. it is tough to find a place for 6 (8Volts ea) of them on a small tractor. I run my tractor at 24V with 4 - 6volt batts. May add another pair of batts behind the seat this year, for 36 Volts.
 

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If you're going to compare the 36V motor to the 48V motor you need to know if they provide the same power, which is to say if the rated voltage * amperage (the wattage) is equal for each motor. If it's not then you're comparing apples and oranges. Or apples to larger apples. If they do have the same power then, typically, the motor with the higher amperage rating will supply more low end torque and the motor with the higher voltage rating will supply more top-end speed.

From your perspective you should really be looking at other factors, notably the fact that you'll need more battery cells to reach 48V as compared to 36V. With lithium batteries that's not such a big deal but with lead acid (golf cart, SLA, etc.) it certainly is.
 

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That is , of course if the controller will be able to handle the higher amperage at start-up, or even peak duration at full motor rating.... apples, oranges and tangerines .... I think of tangerines as the controllers when thinking about brushless motors LOL.
 

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The Sparrow motors are brush type, which require regular maintenance and may need major work after some time. Also such motors are not as easily controlled as BLDCs or induction motors. Hub motors are also limited by being direct drive to the wheel, and maximum torque and speed are a function of the wheel diameter. It may be ideal for bicycles, but for something like a tractor, it may be better to have some sort of transmission.

You will probably do better with something like this, which is a 48V 1000W (1.2HP) BLDC hub motor kit 470 RPM, for about $300.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/48V1000W-26...127?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4600e671c7

If you can spend $425, you can get a brushless 5000 RPM DC motor rated at 80A and 48 VDC, which is 3840W or 5 HP (15 HP peak 1 minute):
http://www.ebay.com/itm/ME0907-Brus...261?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f0b35033d

There may be smaller ones at proportionally smaller cost, or used ones for much less. Such as this 4 HP beast for $150:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/PACIFIC-SCI...147?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item519d91292b

I'm working on a project that uses three phase induction motors powered from a battery. Good luck!
 
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