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Discussion Starter #1
This front hitch came from a 3000 series tractor that was owned by a religious organization and driven by whoever was willing to do it. The attachments were a snowblower, power broom and a snow blade. In this situation, if the machine started and functioned, no body gave it any maintenance and definitely no TLC. Things wore to a point of massive slop and then ripped things apart as it was continued to be used and abused. Then it was repaired (and I use that term loosely) by someone with the welding skills of a farmer. Bushings were replaced with poorly welded in steel inserts, parts were rewelded without being properly straightened and aligned. I will post pictures as I rebuild this hitch.

Bill
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Ejl in Pa.
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I've bought some that were used but never even close to abused like that one. Appears to have taken some serious salt damage and some cobbled welding. Nothing a little sandblasting and new parts won't cure hopefully. Hope you got it cheap!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I started taking a better look at the parts and the relationship of one to another. The very front of the hitch (yoke assembly), the pivoting part has been spread. I measured the inside at the bolt hole, directly behind it and to each side. Then measured out where the "stab" plates ride, the piece is spread just over 1/4". I will press it back into the correct size, then the large bushings for the pivot shaft are $21 each, but there is plenty of meat on these. So I will turn the inside hole true and then make a new pivot shaft that will fit the turned true bushings. The bushing flanges are also worn tapered from the spread of the yoke assembly, I will square them up and then use a 7/8" bolt for the pivot instead of the original 3/4" one. I will make this thing better than it ever was.
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Bill
 

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The one I bought is in similar shape. Broken hitch at the bottom, lift arm stress cracked in multiple places with dirt dauber welding. A project for the future for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey Steve, I got this one for free, from my brother. It is too far gone to fix and sell, just too much to repair. But working for myself I'll save it. The 3000 series tractors are very capable machines, but people will always try to do more with a machine than it is reasonably capable of. Some people are just idiots and beat the cr*p out of everything they use. As a retired maintenance man - I don't like those people.

Bill
 

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Hey Steve, I got this one for free, from my brother. It is too far gone to fix and sell, just too much to repair. But working for myself I'll save it. The 3000 series tractors are very capable machines, but people will always try to do more with a machine than it is reasonably capable of. Some people are just idiots and beat the cr*p out of everything they use. As a retired maintenance man - I don't like those people.

Bill
Yeah, mine has a big 1/4" plate welded to the bottom of the plow blade and I think it was abused and neglected. Grease points dry etc. I use my stuff hard but maintain it and fix it when it breaks. Mine is the same. I wouldn't sell it because of all it needs but will fix it for my use.
 

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As bad as that hitch is, with it's thumb-less repairs and egregious neglect - I can't help but admire the fact that its remained serviceable. A testament to it's original design and manufacture. I can't say that I admire all of CC's designs.
But then again - I'm sure this is elementary to you Bill
(y) Renster
 

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The 3000 series tractors are very capable machines, but people will always try to do more with a machine than it is reasonably capable of. Some people are just idiots and beat the cr*p out of everything they use.
This is especially true when it's not their equipment. I worked for a school district doing building maintenance and landscaping and we had some really nice equipment, only everyone using it had the "it's not mine" mentality. One guy backed over a nearly new Stihl MS660 with a skid steer then shrugged it off like he spilled a glass of milk. While I was there they replaced their old fleet of work trucks with new F150s with utility bodies. It wasn't two months before someone had sideswiped one against the garage.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I squared up the flange surfaces on the pivot bushings. Trued the pivot shaft holes in both bushings, it took .040 to get a full clean cut. So bushings are now 1.29" ID. Made a new pivot shaft 1.288"OD with grease holding grooves. I drilled the new pivot shaft up to 3/4" and then used the boring bar to get a true .875" bore. I do like machining specialty parts, if I was going to rejoin the workforce, I would do custom prototyping.
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Bill
 

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I agree, I come from a Farm Family, "grease it-dont work on it!" was one of my Dads War Cries.......BUT........."As a retired maintenance man - I don't like those people." indeed they gave you a paycheck ?? Just sayin
 

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That's good looking work Bill. When I retire I plan to buy a lathe and do some gunsmithing and turn whatever else I need. I've passed on it for now. I'm such a butterfly hobbiest it's a wonder my wife can put up with me.
 

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I'm jealous of your lathe. When I was in high school I spent as much time in the metal shop as I could. They had 5 South Bend lathes, plus a vertical, a horizontal and a gang mill. Man I miss having access to that stuff.

I drool all over machine shop stuff. Here's the Buick 350 I built last year for my Buick Regal project.

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Ejl in Pa.
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I squared up the flange surfaces on the pivot bushings. Trued the pivot shaft holes in both bushings, it took .040 to get a full clean cut. So bushings are now 1.29" ID. Made a new pivot shaft 1.288"OD with grease holding grooves. I drilled the new pivot shaft up to 3/4" and then used the boring bar to get a true .875" bore. I do like machining specialty parts, if I was going to rejoin the workforce, I would do custom prototyping.
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Bill
Very nice work Bill. I got a little tire of restoring 3000 series tractors the last three years and picked up this 70 Chevelle SS to restore this summer. I have it torn down and in pieces across
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my 2 1/2 car garage. Getting ready to replace the trunk pan and the two rear quarter panels. Car is actually in pretty nice shape for a 50 year old northern car.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks guys, it looks like we share a lot of interests. Steve, I have made some "mufflers" for several of my guns. Joe and Ejl, I guess I was born a gearhead. I worked for a company in Green Bay, where we made Ford GT-X1's, open roadster Ford GT's. I currently have a 1976 Datsun 280Z, running a 2.8 liter 6 cylinder, with a 4bbl and 100HP shot of nitrous. 375 HP on the juice and weighs just under 2000 lbs, runs low 11's and goes around corners too. Great looking Chevelle, what color are you considering to finish her off?

Bill

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Thanks guys, it looks like we share a lot of interests. Steve, I have made some "mufflers" for several of my guns. Joe and Ejl, I guess I was born a gearhead. I worked for a company in Green Bay, where we made Ford GT-X1's, open roadster Ford GT's. I currently have a 1976 Datsun 280Z, running a 2.8 liter 6 cylinder, with a 4bbl and 100HP shot of nitrous. 375 HP on the juice and weighs just under 2000 lbs, runs low 11's and goes around corners too. Great looking Chevelle, what color are you considering to finish her off?

Bill

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Yes we do. I love the gun mufflers. I think form 1 is the way to go if you have a lathe due to the reduced waiting time. I love old cars but got out of the hot rod game and sold my last one a couple months ago (71 vette). I like the 280, always have liked the light weight pointy-nosed cars but just don't like how much money they absorb plus living 1.5 miles down a dirt road makes it hard to keep one looking good.
 

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Ejl in Pa.
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Thanks guys, it looks like we share a lot of interests. Steve, I have made some "mufflers" for several of my guns. Joe and Ejl, I guess I was born a gearhead. I worked for a company in Green Bay, where we made Ford GT-X1's, open roadster Ford GT's. I currently have a 1976 Datsun 280Z, running a 2.8 liter 6 cylinder, with a 4bbl and 100HP shot of nitrous. 375 HP on the juice and weighs just under 2000 lbs, runs low 11's and goes around corners too. Great looking Chevelle, what color are you considering to finish her off?

Bill

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Nice 280Z Bill. The original color from the cowl tag was mist green and I'm not a fan of green. It doesn't have a numbers matching 454 so I'm not concerned about making it an original trailer queen. I am doing a frame off restoration and going to drive it. I bought a used rotisserie, have the engine at the machine shop for boring, front end off and interior and dash gutted. Started drilling spot welds yesterday on panels that need replaced. A 70 Chevelle was my first car at 16. I pumped gas at a gas station for 2 years during the fuel crisis at $2.30/hr to get the money. My parents had to consign at that age and my dad wouldn't sign for a SS and I ended up with a 350 Malibu. Lots of good memories from the back seat of that car.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Ejl, I agree about green. Sounds like we share attitudes about how we build "our" cars too. I always said, it's mine and I'll do what I want to it. My Z has been a joy to build with my son, who learned alot in the process. It has been to some car shows and has taken "Best in Show", but has also been to a ZClub show in Milwaukee where I got raked over the coals by the "purists" who thought I absolutely ruined it. My Z has only been in my shop, no other workers other my son and me. We built the engine, re-did the interior, did the body work and painted it - it still looks like a Z but there is no panel that is completely stock. Personally I like it that way.

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Ejl in Pa.
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I am still debating the color. I'm torn between Fathom Blue and Tuxedo Black. Also I'm thinking of a vinyl roof if I go a color other than black. Got a lot of work between now and paint. I will leave the paint job to a professional.
 
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