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Discussion Starter #1
I recently bought a 1946 ford 2N with a Freeman loader and have been trying to make it a reliable runner. So far I have changed points, condenser, cap, rotor, plugs, wires and 6v coil. I have installed a 12 volt battery with a ballast resistor in line between the batt terminal and the key switch, from there through a new original resistor to the coil. Tractor was running this past Sunday just fine. It sat for a few days with the gas valve on and flooded the carb - no start. I drained the carb and let the gas run out of the carb throat to correct the flooding issue, still no start. I have spark (checked by removing plug and grounding to manifold while cranking). I left the fuel turned off and tried to fire it with only ether and still nothing. I am stumped.
 

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How much gas was in the tank..?? I'm wondering if the seal on the hose's connecting the carb. to air cleaner tube were good enough, that it filled the oil cup on the oil bath breather, enough not to let it pull air in. I know it's pretty high, and theoretically should have filled one of the cylinders with gas, through an open intake valve, causing it to hydro-lock, unless the gas seeped down around the rings, into the oil pan, over that couple of days.

Pulling the dipstick, and looking at the oil level should tell you PDQ, if in fact it did. And won't take but a minute to drop the oil cup on the air filter assy.

Highly unlikely, but, you never know...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I will check that but like you said, highly unlikely. I tried to start it with the air cleaner disconnected at the carb and no go that way either.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ill pick some up today and try that. Fingers crossed. What are good starting points for the carb settings. I have the idle mix screw at 1 1/2 turns out. Haven't checked the main jet yet but will do so before I try to start her up again.
 

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How much gas was in the tank..?? I'm wondering if the seal on the hose's connecting the carb. to air cleaner tube were good enough, that it filled the oil cup on the oil bath breather, enough not to let it pull air in. I know it's pretty high, and theoretically should have filled one of the cylinders with gas, through an open intake valve, causing it to hydro-lock, unless the gas seeped down around the rings, into the oil pan, over that couple of days.

Pulling the dipstick, and looking at the oil level should tell you PDQ, if in fact it did. And won't take but a minute to drop the oil cup on the air filter assy.

Highly unlikely, but, you never know...
If you find that the oil level has risen...drain and change the oil as it will be diluted with gasolene....filter too...the plugs may have been new...but once subjected to flooding need to be made "new" again or replaced
 

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When if flooded it ruined the spark plugs. Best to get a new set of plugs. Crank it for a while to make sure its dry and put new plugs in.
flooding an engine does NOT ruin spark plugs.
They are fine.

Here is what you need to make a gas engine run:

1 Fuel & Air
2 Spark
3 Compression

Everyone was focusing on the first 2. My question is: do you have compression?
 

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Wally ...I think a few of us have had spark plug problems when they have gotten wet....I have never had them ruined...but very problematic....I wondered about the compression issue too...but in a 4 cylinder engine I don't think it could be one stuck exhaust valve would be enough to prevent it from starting .....and what could suddenly cause enough compression drop that it could be the problem in all cylinders....could it be the plugs are not clean and dry enough for a good enough spark?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yes there is compression. Didn't put the gauge on it but with a finger over a spark plug hole there is plenty of force blowing out. Won't be able to put a gauge on it unless we pull the tank/hood off again. (Kind of a pita)
Today we changed plugs out for a new set. Tried a shot of ether and got a rumble of life. Hooked everything back up after dinner and now no spark. WTH!! I believe my grandson left the key on and possibly fried the coil.
What would be the process of testing it with a meter to be sure? Probably going to pull the tank/hood tomorrow. Remove the distributor again and check point gap and clean if needed, check coil, and possibly pull the carb, I'm thinking the float is stuck or maybe full of fuel. When the gas valve is turned on it floods out soon after to the point there is fuel in the carb throat.
All this to do while my garage is full so it's an outside project and it's been a bit chilly and windy today. Figures .......lol
 

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Check for 12v at the + terminal of the coil with the key turned "on"

check coil for continuity (should have continuity).

Check coil for resistance--2 to 6 ohms. If zero, it's a bad coil.

remove points cover and clean the points. Run a dollar bill between them, or a piece of fine sandpaper. Check again for spark.


Check to see if the plug sparks from the threads to the ground point--it should not. replace plug if it does.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
To check continuity that would be from the post on top to the spiral below correct? This is my first experience with these square coils so forgive the dumb questions. Lol
 

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a relatively new plug that is soaked with fuel or oil will not spark obviously... neither will one wet with water... but that doesnt mean you have to replace it. Just clean it. That's all I was thinking. The OP said the plugs had 3hrs on them, so a recommendation to replace them is most likely just a waste of money - unless something happened in those 3 hours that would have ruined them.
For example, an engine that is pinging can ruin plugs within a matter of minutes or hours. Or if the engine overheated due to cooling problems. Etc. Anything that would mechanically or thermally stress the plug.

At this time, it sounds like the ignition needs fixing.

Another item to consider is - where the plug wires moved around... maybe you mixed up the wires on the distributor, so that you are sparking the cylinder on the exhaust stroke, not the compression stroke.... in taking things apart and putting back together, I've made that simple mistake by simply not paying attention....

cheers!
 

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Any possibility that you forgot to put the rotor back in the distributor...or that the distributor cap is on incorrectly?...ask me how I know that can happen :tango_face_wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Lol, no the cap, rotor and distributor we're all correct.
Apparently the coil was burnt so I replaced with a 12 volt coil since I am running a 12 volt battery. I need to change a little bit of wiring around due to a mistake today on my part but she did fire up and run. Just want to pull the hood off again and double check everything before I run her to much just to be sure things are right.
Not sure how or why the flooding took place other than maybe we were a little to happy with the choke trying to get it to start? Pulled the carb and removed the bowl. All looked good, cleaned it up and checked the float needle and seat for function and all was good.
In the near future I will replace the generator with a mini 12 volt internal regulator type alternator to handle the charging duties. Then the 12 volt conversion will be complete and hopefully no more trouble.
 
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