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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am new to the JD world and just acquired a 1979 212 a few days ago. I am in the process of going through it see what it needs, etc. Everything has been silky smooth thus far except the removal of the front draft plate.

The deck is the 47" original as per the owner and everything looks original and well kept. How exactly are the pins that hold the drift plate to the front frame supposed to come out/loosen up? It appears to me that they look to be spring loaded and pull inwards and then lock in their notch.

It is clear (or so i thought) there is a horizontal "L" machined into the drift plate tube. I have 3lb sledged, PB-blasted, propane torched, and PB-blasted again and i can only get them to move about 1cm inwards, not enough to clear the frame and there is no springing pushing them back out. There appears to be extremely heavy duty roll pins installed to act as the lever to pull on.

I am just curious as to why these are being such a bear and everything else is like butter on the 212? Am i missing something? The pics below are not mine (obviously) but are identical and off a 200 series.



 

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My 110 uses the same draft plate and had sat outside for 3 years. I had to persuade it off with a 3 lb. sledge and then splooshed it with pneumatic tool lubricating oil for a couple days to loosen it up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My 110 uses the same draft plate and had sat outside for 3 years. I had to persuade it off with a 3 lb. sledge and then splooshed it with pneumatic tool lubricating oil for a couple days to loosen it up.
Wow, i can honestly say in all my years of truck, tractor, and jeep rebuilds and all sorts of other mechanically natured things that i have never run into anything this stuck. I have actually begun flattening out the taper on the pin on both sides... 6'6" 300lb firefighter swinging a 3lb sledge as hard as i can. I suppose i might be bungie-cording up the plate afterall
 

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You might be better off just getting one off of eBbay, They normally go for betwee $5 - $10 depending on the bidding. I had one that came with my 216 that was a bear until I got it loosened. I would keep repeating the PB Blaster and working it for a few days though!
 

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Wow, i can honestly say in all my years of truck, tractor, and jeep rebuilds and all sorts of other mechanically natured things that i have never run into anything this stuck. I have actually begun flattening out the taper on the pin on both sides... 6'6" 300lb firefighter swinging a 3lb sledge as hard as i can. I suppose i might be bungie-cording up the plate afterall
If its that bad, time and oil may be your only salvation. Either keep soaking it with PB Blaster or let it sit with something heavier. i also had to sledge out the retaining pin on the right side draft arm as that was the side more exposed to the weather. Otherwise consider replacement as PA318Guy suggested.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I might just do that...i'll spray it a few more times and if it doesn't budge than i will be ebaying it. Ironically, it looks in near perfect condition without even a hint of surface rust. I'll get back with the final results.

I am sure i will have a few other questions before i get done rehabilitating this 800lb chunk of American-made goodness
 

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I'm always glad my father taught me the simple rule. If it's supposed to move oil it occassionally! Seems some folks were never introduced to an oil can!
 

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I think if I am reading your OP correctly, your draw plate is still installed on the tractor, right? I've had these pins get stubborn before, but never had one defy a little leverage let alone a hammer. I'm curious how you are even getting a 3lb sledge into position to give it a good wack. Are you using a drift pin or something to get on the end of one side or the other?

I know your picture is not of the plate you are trying to remove, but it appears to have been welded/repaired. Any evidence the one you are working on might also have been welded/repaired or heated for some other purpose?

I like the idea of an eBay or CL replacement at the prices mentioned, but I guess that doesn't solve your problem of actually removing it from the tractor. You may in fact be looking at bungy cording it up out of the way when you are operating without the deck. Do you intend to use a front blade?

Last and not such a novel idea is give it time in an oil bath or lockease or some such. Patience will be your friend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, i have slain the beast by taking a wheel off and then using more of the good ol' PB Blaster and propane torch method. This time the 3lb sledge was sending sparks all over.

I drilled a pilot hold in the middle of the tube and it quickly made me realize what the heck was going on. The entire tube was completle filled with about 50% sand and about 50% caliche...so pretty much concrete...no wonder they wouldn't move more than a cm.

I was finally able to pound a pin in just enough to drop the plate and then over to the big-boy vise it went. I pulled the roll pins and ended up sledging both everything out one side...getting about 1-3mm movement for each hit. Needless to say, i absolutely destroyed what was left of the spring during this process. The pile of sand and caliche on the workbench was ridiculous.

I wire-wheeled the pins, cleaned the tube, and found a good replacement spring in my junk bin. I also added a grease fitting so that this foolishness will never happen again. Now is it a beautifully smooth, greasy action and the tube it is completely filled with grease.

 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Great mod :fing32: But the Durn Yankee has to ask: what the heck is caliche?
Caliche is essentially powdered limestone. I live in the "hill country" of TX and it's everywhere (because there is limestone everywhere). There is plenty of caliche powder found in natural settings, but when you cut new roads you will usually end up with a good portion of the base being caliche
 

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ajs96, way to persevere! I have run into several issues similar to yours over the years with these little tractors. When I get frustrated I try and tell myself it's worth it. The 212 is an awesome tractor, I mowed with a 214 for 11 years and in that time I rebuilt just about everything. Enjoy your tractor! Adam
 

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Caliche is essentially powdered limestone. I live in the "hill country" of TX and it's everywhere (because there is limestone everywhere). There is plenty of caliche powder found in natural settings, but when you cut new roads you will usually end up with a good portion of the base being caliche
Ugh. I'll bet when it mixes with water and dries it turns into concrete too. :banghead3
 
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