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Discussion Starter #1
Good evening All,

I have picked up a used integral hitch and rear lift setup for my 210


and have a line on a helper spring from J & D Lawn Tractor. Dave over at J & D told me they did not make a hydro lift for the 210 and what I can install would be dependent on what type of deck lift I have which is manual. He also indicated that I needed a third piece but for the life of me and not sure what that is. :banghead3

Can anyone please shed some light on this newbie's first JD experience :praying:

:thanku:
 

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It looks like you have everything you need for your 200 series but #12 in the parts blowup which are the special sleeved bolts (part #19H1721) for the lower attaching point. And they did offer a hydro lift option for the 200 series as you see on eBay. Go to http://jdpc.deere.com/jdpc/servlet/com.deere.u90490.partscatalog.view.servlets.HomePageServlet_Alt type 210 into the model search and it will bring up the complete parts book for your tractor. It's the same pages Dave should be looking at. Sometimes you need to know a persons job better than they do so you don't get the wrong intel. Then you can go to http://dealerlocator.deere.com/serv...Country=USA&sessionId=YUk55i6eVN_hnd4jgcYbD6O and find yourself a dealership near you and also look the part numbers up and see prices and availability.
Enjoy your new tractor.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It looks like you have everything you need for your 200 series but #12 in the parts blowup which are the special sleeved bolts (part #19H1721) for the lower attaching point. And they did offer a hydro lift option for the 200 series as you see on eBay. Go to http://jdpc.deere.com/jdpc/servlet/com.deere.u90490.partscatalog.view.servlets.HomePageServlet_Alt type 210 into the model search and it will bring up the complete parts book for your tractor. It's the same pages Dave should be looking at. Sometimes you need to know a persons job better than they do so you don't get the wrong intel. Then you can go to http://dealerlocator.deere.com/serv...Country=USA&sessionId=YUk55i6eVN_hnd4jgcYbD6O and find yourself a dealership near you and also look the part numbers up and see prices and availability.
Enjoy your new tractor.
Thank you CP7 for your input and the great info... there is a unit up on ebay now that says it i a hydro lift unit for a 200 series... currently at $300. Would you happen to know what I should expect to pay for one, in other words what should I expect to pay for a hydro lift unit out in the real world?

:thanku:
 

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I'll bet that auction goes closer to $500 because it looks like it is all there. You wouldn't have to buy or fab some little bracket or find the extra pulley for the engine. Complete helps the value allot. But your missing the fact that in your real world you could go buy the whole tractor with hydro lift for $500. Part some of the rest of that 110 out and and you could have your lift cheaper. If the transaxle is good on the 110 you'd do good to keep it and have a spare (it's the same as the 210) because looking at the pictures of your property your going to work the heck out of your tractor and that will be the thing that goes out. I'd go offer the guy $400 or even $300 for it especially now that you don't need it and pay attention to the hydro lift and make sure it's all there and hasn't been jerry rigged like the rest of the machine.
Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'll bet that auction goes closer to $500 because it looks like it is all there. You wouldn't have to buy or fab some little bracket or find the extra pulley for the engine. Complete helps the value allot. But your missing the fact that in your real world you could go buy the whole tractor with hydro lift for $500. Part some of the rest of that 110 out and and you could have your lift cheaper. If the transaxle is good on the 110 you'd do good to keep it and have a spare (it's the same as the 210) because looking at the pictures of your property your going to work the heck out of your tractor and that will be the thing that goes out. I'd go offer the guy $400 or even $300 for it especially now that you don't need it and pay attention to the hydro lift and make sure it's all there and hasn't been jerry rigged like the rest of the machine.
Good luck.

Thanks for your input CP7. When I called J & D Tractor and told him I have a JD 200 for parts he said that is a rare tractor and would be worth restoreing or if I were to part it out he would be interested. Seems there were not too many made according to Dave.... I do see how a lot of the parts on the JD 200 seems to cross over to the JD 210. I am still watching the eBay listing for the Hydraulic lift assembly but might try the used parts rout as well. I just wanted to get a sense of how much a unit like this can be had so as not to get a bum deal...

:thanku:
 

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This is off the Weekend Freedom Machines site and is about everything you need to know about your tractors without getting greasy. Where it says 15% were set up with those options insert "rare and expensive".



The John Deere 200 Series

With the 1975 model year, the new 200 series tractors were introduced. While this meant the introduction of a brand new line of lawn tractors, it also meant the demise of the 110 and 112 workhorses. The following 110/112 design features were retained:

The four speed 2300 series Peerless transmission with cast housing and full compliment of bearings.
-The two V-belt Variator Drive.
-Mechanical clutch PTO same as the 110/112 series.
-Front and rear attachment point remained unchanged from 110/112 series.
-Continuation of operator comforts such as neutral starting system and fully padded, highback seat and an optional "float-ride" type seat base.
Incorporated in this new model design were the following improvements:

A choice of engine options: 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 horsepower Kohler engines.
Rubber Iso-mounted engine.
Fully shrouded engine with shrouded, low tone muffler system
New style hood and grill with back-sloped brow to reflect styling on full size Ag tractors.

Five horsepower sized models were offered during the thirteen years the 200 series was marketed. In 1975 the 200, (8 hp), 210 (10 hp), 212 (12 hp), 214 (14 hp) were offered. The 200 was dropped from the line in the 1976 model year due to lack of consumer demand. The 210, 212, 214 were built until the completion of the 1987 model year. in model year 1979 the model 216 (16 hp) was added to the 200 series and was offered until the competition of the 1987 model year.

Deere designers maintained the Quick-Tach type mounting that had proved successful on the late model 110/112 tractors. This allowed use of all front and rear attachments used on the late model 110/112 tractors. This allowed the L&G owner to "trade-up" on his tractor and continue to use his 110/112 attachments. Included in the list of transferable attachments are:

39 and 47 mower deck
37A snow thrower
43 front blade
31 mechanical tiller with up to two extensions
rear sleeve hitch and all associated implements
all dump carts and hitch drawn equipment
choice of front and rear wheel/tire options
wheel weights and chains
weights and weight bracket for front and rear mounting



Allied equipment manufacturers were pleased as well. Minimal redesign of their equipment is all that was required to adapt to the new 200 series.

The 200 series came standard with a mechanical attachment lift system with drop links for the mowing deck and reach rods to front and rear for attachment lift systems. A lift assist spring was offered to lighten the lever forces. An optional electric lift and also a hydraulic lift was also offered. Estimated that less that 15% of the tractors were set up with these options. The hydraulic lift option was similar to installations on the 110/112 tractors, except the pump/relief valve and the control valve were separate components. The hydraulic reservoir was separate with a one quart capacity.

The 200 series finally separated the battery and the fuel tank. A 3-1/2 gallon fuel tank was located under the seat deck.. A fuel pump was installed on the Kohler engines to insure correct delivery of fuel. The battery remained under the hood.

The 200 series tipped the scales at about 750 pounds for a 212 model. Add 7-8 pounds per model as engine size changed. Add on about 170 pounds for a mowing deck and you had a pretty nice, stable mowing and garden working tractor.

The 200 series was built relatively unchanged for thirteen years. The 1975-76 models had screened engine covers. from 1977 on, the screens were replaced with the more recognized louvers. Over the years, there were minor changes in engine mounts, manual PTO linkages and muffler shrouding. In 1979, all models were upgraded to an electrical PTO clutch.

All of the 200 series models were included in the same serial number series. Serial number was preceded by an equipment type code prefix as:

1975 - 1982 C210, C212, C214 and 1979-82 C216
1983 - 1987 M00210X, M00212X, M00214X and M00216T

Year Serial Number
1975 30,001-55,000
1976 55,001-70,000
1977 70,001-80,000
1978 80,001-95,000
1979 95,001-120,000
1980 120,001-155,000
1981 155,001-190,000
1982 190,001-222,000
1983 222,001-285,000
1984 285,001-315,000
1985 315,001-360,000
1986 360,001-420,000
1987 420,001-475,000



Summary by Richard Brandt, Photos from John Deere advertising literature. 01/23/2002
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This is off the Weekend Freedom Machines site and is about everything you need to know about your tractors without getting greasy. Where it says 15% were set up with those options insert "rare and expensive".



The John Deere 200 Series

With the 1975 model year, the new 200 series tractors were introduced. While this meant the introduction of a brand new line of lawn tractors, it also meant the demise of the 110 and 112 workhorses. The following 110/112 design features were retained:

The four speed 2300 series Peerless transmission with cast housing and full compliment of bearings.
-The two V-belt Variator Drive.
-Mechanical clutch PTO same as the 110/112 series.
-Front and rear attachment point remained unchanged from 110/112 series.
-Continuation of operator comforts such as neutral starting system and fully padded, highback seat and an optional "float-ride" type seat base.
Incorporated in this new model design were the following improvements:

A choice of engine options: 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 horsepower Kohler engines.
Rubber Iso-mounted engine.
Fully shrouded engine with shrouded, low tone muffler system
New style hood and grill with back-sloped brow to reflect styling on full size Ag tractors.

Five horsepower sized models were offered during the thirteen years the 200 series was marketed. In 1975 the 200, (8 hp), 210 (10 hp), 212 (12 hp), 214 (14 hp) were offered. The 200 was dropped from the line in the 1976 model year due to lack of consumer demand. The 210, 212, 214 were built until the completion of the 1987 model year. in model year 1979 the model 216 (16 hp) was added to the 200 series and was offered until the competition of the 1987 model year.

Deere designers maintained the Quick-Tach type mounting that had proved successful on the late model 110/112 tractors. This allowed use of all front and rear attachments used on the late model 110/112 tractors. This allowed the L&G owner to "trade-up" on his tractor and continue to use his 110/112 attachments. Included in the list of transferable attachments are:

39 and 47 mower deck
37A snow thrower
43 front blade
31 mechanical tiller with up to two extensions
rear sleeve hitch and all associated implements
all dump carts and hitch drawn equipment
choice of front and rear wheel/tire options
wheel weights and chains
weights and weight bracket for front and rear mounting



Allied equipment manufacturers were pleased as well. Minimal redesign of their equipment is all that was required to adapt to the new 200 series.

The 200 series came standard with a mechanical attachment lift system with drop links for the mowing deck and reach rods to front and rear for attachment lift systems. A lift assist spring was offered to lighten the lever forces. An optional electric lift and also a hydraulic lift was also offered. Estimated that less that 15% of the tractors were set up with these options. The hydraulic lift option was similar to installations on the 110/112 tractors, except the pump/relief valve and the control valve were separate components. The hydraulic reservoir was separate with a one quart capacity.

The 200 series finally separated the battery and the fuel tank. A 3-1/2 gallon fuel tank was located under the seat deck.. A fuel pump was installed on the Kohler engines to insure correct delivery of fuel. The battery remained under the hood.

The 200 series tipped the scales at about 750 pounds for a 212 model. Add 7-8 pounds per model as engine size changed. Add on about 170 pounds for a mowing deck and you had a pretty nice, stable mowing and garden working tractor.

The 200 series was built relatively unchanged for thirteen years. The 1975-76 models had screened engine covers. from 1977 on, the screens were replaced with the more recognized louvers. Over the years, there were minor changes in engine mounts, manual PTO linkages and muffler shrouding. In 1979, all models were upgraded to an electrical PTO clutch.

All of the 200 series models were included in the same serial number series. Serial number was preceded by an equipment type code prefix as:

1975 - 1982 C210, C212, C214 and 1979-82 C216
1983 - 1987 M00210X, M00212X, M00214X and M00216T

Year Serial Number
1975 30,001-55,000
1976 55,001-70,000
1977 70,001-80,000
1978 80,001-95,000
1979 95,001-120,000
1980 120,001-155,000
1981 155,001-190,000
1982 190,001-222,000
1983 222,001-285,000
1984 285,001-315,000
1985 315,001-360,000
1986 360,001-420,000
1987 420,001-475,000



Summary by Richard Brandt, Photos from John Deere advertising literature. 01/23/2002

:thanku: I was reading that last night... still question the cost factor, guess I will have to do more research.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok.. been a while and I finally plan on getting the pieces installed. New newbie question.. do I need to drop the cutting deck before installing the helper spring and rear sleeve hitch? I also got a snow plow blade for the front. Still did not get the tech manual, have one local I am working on getting but in the mean time do I need to drop the cutting deck and how hard is that?

:thanku:
 

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Dropping the deck for install will defiantly make putting it on a whole lot easier as well as removing the fender deck Because where you have to connect the rod item 4 to the rocker shaft and the spring assist to the mowing deck rocker shaft

The hardest part of the install will be Putting the threaded rod item 23 though the plate item 6 other than that its pretty simple But I forgot you have the gas tank back there two I only had the fender deck on my 112 The about diagram will show you what you need for all parts for putting on the Integral hitch I can get you the JD parts number's as well:thThumbsU
Parts that are no longer avaliable from deere
4,5,6,22 & 8 and of coarse the hitch itself is NLA
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Sergeant for the info... hope to get started tomorrow evening... and yes please forward the parts list if you have it...

:thanku:
 

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NJN I sent you a PM with the parts numbers and a place to get the integral hitch install instructions and that place also has spring assist install instructions:thThumbsU
 
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