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How's that cane break work after you cut it? Did you cut it ground level or at a certain height? Will it continue growing after cut?
I hear it will even grow here in the mid west. Any way what I consider mid west.
But we must watch out for invasive species when planting things.
According to what I know it will keep growing back. You need to dig the roots out to kill it. Around here in PA if starts to grow in a year you will have a forest.
 
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I’m in for a rough one this year. We moved into our new home last April/May. A bit late to start a garden. Oh, and it’s clay soil… not a lick of topsoil. Got a healthy compost pile about ready to till in. Gonna rent a tiller to bust up this clay. Not gonna risk my 30 tiller in this ground until I can get some better things mixed into it.
I presume you are talking about a home garden. several suggestions to consider : If you have the space, try to take 1/2 of your planned garden and plant buckwheat. it germinates quickly. mow it down / till it in lightly, and plant again. you should be able to get several successive plantings in a season - 3, perhaps 4 depending on your climate. in the fall plant winter wheat / winter rye. mow it down if it starts to get tall. eventually you can till it in and plant again Also if you can get leaves use them for mulch in your vegetable garden. After a few years of the buckwheat / rye rotations the clay will start to break up.
 

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At 70, and more of a mechanic not a farmer, I am going to try to plant a garden now that I have some acreage to do so. I'll be watching this post with some interest as I know little about gardening. The only other producing items are a few really old and not maintained apple trees that I uncovered from encroaching Maples and Red Pines. Fall 2021 they produced a lot of fruit, but fall 2022 barely anything. Not sure why although it was a pretty dry year here in 2022.

I've roto tilled a small triangular shaped plot, maybe 20 feet on each side. Not very big as I have to keep it manageable. Top 1/3 of this triangular plot is a foot higher than the rest and only a tad sandier than the darker soils of the lower 2/3. Tilled in the sod/weeds last fall, one slow pass with the tiller, and left it pretty coarse, lots of clumps almost looking like it was mold board plowed. Next up is some fencing as we have a lot of deer traffic here. I have tons of leaves for mulch but not sure this soil needs it.

Thoughts about what to plant, how much and when, would be welcomed. (Central Thumb of Michigan here). I'd like to try some easy things that could stand some mistakes by this "its all news to me" gardener. I have a lake about 50 feet away from this plot so irrigation is a definite possibility if dry spells occur.

My wife keeps muttering something about Oliver and the "Green Acres" TV show... :unsure:
we have a couple old apple trees and our harvest is highly dependent on the weather when they are flowering. If we get a frost during that time the harvest is not so good. We do not do anything special - no herbicides no pesticides, etc. Just let them do their thing. We make alot of apple sauce and have a small percentage of eating apples, because we do not use pesticides so the apples are sometimes marked up. Lately we have been getting better quality apples, not sure why. At one point they were very overgrown. so I committed to pruning them back, and in some cases the branches were so large they had to be cut back with my reciprocating saw. Stick to about 1/3 of what needs to be pruned per year. After 3 years you will be ok. There may be a good time to prune, but in my experience it is when I have the saw and pruner in my hand. Usually in Feb / March before they wake up. Cut away anything growing straight up. Cut away crossing branches. And while you are at it, I tend to cut branches that are too high for me to harvest even though I have one of those long pole basket type harvesting backets.
 

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At 70, and more of a mechanic not a farmer, I am going to try to plant a garden now that I have some acreage to do so. I'll be watching this post with some interest as I know little about gardening. The only other producing items are a few really old and not maintained apple trees that I uncovered from encroaching Maples and Red Pines. Fall 2021 they produced a lot of fruit, but fall 2022 barely anything. Not sure why although it was a pretty dry year here in 2022.

I've roto tilled a small triangular shaped plot, maybe 20 feet on each side. Not very big as I have to keep it manageable. Top 1/3 of this triangular plot is a foot higher than the rest and only a tad sandier than the darker soils of the lower 2/3. Tilled in the sod/weeds last fall, one slow pass with the tiller, and left it pretty coarse, lots of clumps almost looking like it was mold board plowed. Next up is some fencing as we have a lot of deer traffic here. I have tons of leaves for mulch but not sure this soil needs it.

Thoughts about what to plant, how much and when, would be welcomed. (Central Thumb of Michigan here). I'd like to try some easy things that could stand some mistakes by this "its all news to me" gardener. I have a lake about 50 feet away from this plot so irrigation is a definite possibility if dry spells occur.

My wife keeps muttering something about Oliver and the "Green Acres" TV show... :unsure:
I tend toward storage crops such as potatoes and butternut squash. One or two tomatoes, one zucchini, one cuke, one cherry tomato and that's it for traditional home garden vegetables. The rest is potatoes and squash - still eating potatoes and squash I harvested last year. oh, and I also grow garlic. good luck!
 

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We were the opposite. Ground didn't get dry enough to work until mid July. By then the dry spell hit.
I have been contiplating a more controled growing environment for years.
My garden area is VERY wet. I decided on a 20 x 40 bed (acutally I have several because I rotate), and hand dug a trench 2 shovels wide and maybe 4 to 6 inches deep all the way around as well as trenches across the narrow width so I have about 6 beds that are maybe 5 x 16 (after accounting for the trench / paths). I shoveled the trench dirt into the beds so I ended up with 'double dug' raised beds. in the spring and during any rainy spells, my crops are in the higher double-dug beds and the water is in the trenches/paths. the raised beds warm up quicker. Since I have done that my troubles from drainage and rain have lessened considerably. Good luck!
 

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My garden area is VERY wet. I decided on a 20 x 40 bed (acutally I have several because I rotate), and hand dug a trench 2 shovels wide and maybe 4 to 6 inches deep all the way around as well as trenches across the narrow width so I have about 6 beds that are maybe 5 x 16 (after accounting for the trench / paths). I shoveled the trench dirt into the beds so I ended up with 'double dug' raised beds. in the spring and during any rainy spells, my crops are in the higher double-dug beds and the water is in the trenches/paths. the raised beds warm up quicker. Since I have done that my troubles from drainage and rain have lessened considerably. Good luck!
Plant Plant community Botany Tree Natural landscape
 

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My garden area is VERY wet. I decided on a 20 x 40 bed (acutally I have several because I rotate), and hand dug a trench 2 shovels wide and maybe 4 to 6 inches deep all the way around as well as trenches across the narrow width so I have about 6 beds that are maybe 5 x 16 (after accounting for the trench / paths). I shoveled the trench dirt into the beds so I ended up with 'double dug' raised beds. in the spring and during any rainy spells, my crops are in the higher double-dug beds and the water is in the trenches/paths. the raised beds warm up quicker. Since I have done that my troubles from drainage and rain have lessened considerably. Good luck!
How do you keep the critters at bay?
This is our first year starting a garden, but we're thinking raised bed after watching a ground hog eat all the low hanging limbs and veggies from our neighbors raised bed.
 

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How do you keep the critters at bay?
This is our first year starting a garden, but we're thinking raised bed after watching a ground hog eat all the low hanging limbs and veggies from our neighbors raised bed.
I put a fence around mine and digi it 6 inches into the ground. Plus I may shoot a hog or two per year. ;) 3 years ago I got 12 of them.
 

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How do you keep the critters at bay?
This is our first year starting a garden, but we're thinking raised bed after watching a ground hog eat all the low hanging limbs and veggies from our neighbors raised bed.
I put a 4ft high fence around the vegetable garden, but nothing around the squash bed nor the garlic bed. Does not need to be super sturdy. I think I had a 5ft post every 8 or 10 ft. I think I had some critter damage in my squash bed last year, and thinking of expanding my potatoes, so I may buy more 4ft fence. it will not keep deer out, but will keep the wood chucks out. Also, I have seen rabbits squeeze through the 4ft wire fence where we have traditional vegetables, so I added a roll of chicken wire fence along the bottom. Not sure I will do that for the squash and potato beds this year.
 

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Wow, tons of ideas here!!

I will be thinking of a few pumpkin plants that can spread outside of the tilled areas. Basil is one of our favorites on chicken thighs when grilled indoors so a row of that I think. Zucchini, lettuce, and maybe some onion and garlic also may find a home here. Have a couple of large pots about 30" around at the top and 24" high that I might try planting tomatoes in.

Will see how this goes after I get a fence around it. The deer ate all the leaves off of my Hostas last summer leaving me with what looked more like celery stalks everywhere. Not sure if the repellant granules work or not, might try them this year.
 

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Wow, tons of ideas here!!

I will be thinking of a few pumpkin plants that can spread outside of the tilled areas. Basil is one of our favorites on chicken thighs when grilled indoors so a row of that I think. Zucchini, lettuce, and maybe some onion and garlic also may find a home here. Have a couple of large pots about 30" around at the top and 24" high that I might try planting tomatoes in.

Will see how this goes after I get a fence around it. The deer ate all the leaves off of my Hostas last summer leaving me with what looked more like celery stalks everywhere. Not sure if the repellant granules work or not, might try them this year.
On the Pumpkins and Zucchini plants do expect vine borer, squash bugs, and Cucumber Beetles. My plan this year is to inject BT in my Spaghetti Squash with a syringe to help prevent vine borer damage, May even try it on a few Cuke plants. Spraying plants with Spinosad and Kaolin Clay to kill and deter Squash bugs, and Cuke Beetles. There are several YouTube video's on injecting the BT in squash plants.

Last year I had very good results spraying plants with Lavender oil to deter Deer. I got a quart bottle off of Amazon, and doubt I used 1/3 of a bottle, and sprayed a lot with all of the rain we had. I used it on all plants with no ill effects to the plants. It does need to be reapplied after a moderate rain, but enough scent left to keep them from eating plants for a day or so, until I could get in the garden to spray again. Also found a store brand Lavender scented Castile soap to act as a surfactant on waxy leaves, and let it mix with the water. It only takes 2 TBS of oil per gallon of spray. I usually mix it in with the Spinosad to save trips spraying. Deer here will take any bean clear to the ground, and browse on tomato plants, and occasionally the pepper plants. I just hit it all so I'm covered.
 

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I have purchased almost all the seeds I want for this year. I started buying open pollinated and keeping seeds from them last year. I don't have many more to get and I should never have to buy seed again (y)
How do you keep the critters at bay?
This is our first year starting a garden, but we're thinking raised bed after watching a ground hog eat all the low hanging limbs and veggies from our neighbors raised bed.
I think persistence at whatever you decide to try is the only way to keep anything out of the garden.
My biggest problem is insects, especially the squash bugs. I might try some bt this year. I got some Neem oil last year and seemed to help. I think the deer do more damage than anything else though. I tried growing lavendar the past 2 years and had 1 seed germinate, the plant didn't make it too far into the season. I'll try again this year.
I bought a 7 ft by 100 ft "deer fence" from TSC last year to hang around my corn and beans. It's really a pretty flimsy netting, but I don't think the deer understand what it is and didn't bother trying to figure it out. They only took the top off 1 ear of corn, and that was because it was growing up against the fence. It was cheap enough and I was impressed enough to buy a 2nd this year. The rabbits and groundhog figured out they could chew through the bottom at will, and it was certainly no match for the squirrel and crows. Some wire at the bottom would certainly help. I started some corn in early July last year just to see if it would grow out, I left this corn unprotected. When the deer and squirrel started getting after it I mixed up some garlic powder with habanero powder and sprinkled on the silks. They seemed to leave it alone after that for a short while, but it seemed I had to keep reapplying that fairly often to keep them away. I had some spider mites on the catnip I had in a planter and sprayed it down with Neem oil. I took notice my cats wanted no part of that catnip even after I washed it off good, so I sprayed some of it on the corn. The deer completely left it alone after that.
I'm going to try planting an area, or a couple this year to leave unprotected for the animals. I'm hoping they all think like animals and follow the path of least resistance to the food.
 

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My biggest problem is insects, especially the squash bugs. I might try some bt this year. BT will not control Squash Bugs, but will kill vine borers, and other types of worms caterpillars. Spinosad is an organic alternative insecticide that will kill Squash Bugs. I don't know if you saw my post on Squash Bugs in another thread, but I was incorrect on using BT for squash bugs. I intend to inject my Spaghetti Squash plants with BT as shown in the video below, to prevent vine borer damage. Both above products work well if you can get it on, and keep it on the plant. I lost my 2/3 mature squash last year after a long period of rains where I couldn't get in to spray. Hopefully injecting the BT will keep them somewhat protected until I can do a foliar spray if that situation occurs again. I've attached the video I posted in the other thread, showing injecting the plants. I got syringes at Rural King, 3/$$2.99. Forgot to mention I'll be spraying Kaolin Clay on the Spaghetti Squash and Cukes, and hopefully drive pests to the trap plants

I also intend to plant some Hubbard Squash as trap plants. The pheromones they put out is highly attractive to Squash Bugs and Cucumber Beetles too. My thoughts are to pinch off most blooms on the Hubbard Squash, inject them too with BT, and kept sprayed with Spinosad. I'm hoping to harvest a few of the Hubbard's for seed for future use if this works. Seeds aren't that expensive, but....

And for those who may have missed it, in last years thread or newbies joining in this year, if you want to grow shell type beans, buy a bag of your favorite shell beans at the grocery and plant them. I bought a 2 lb. bag of Great Northern beans at Dollar General last year for around $3.00. Planted 2, 80' rows, and still had enough for a large pot of beans. Once you get a successful crop, save some of them for seed in the future. Just store them where it's cool. I've planted some that were 3 years old, and grew fine. Same works for Peas. If you have some peas that have matured to the tough stage, leave them on the vine, and pick when they have dried, and save for seed.

I don't know if anyone else has noticed, but some of the larger seed companies have nearly doubled their prices since last year. So far, one of the places I do buy seed from Holmes Seeds Vegetables - Cucumber - Cucumber - Pickle - Page 1 - Holmes Seed Company has kept their prices inline with last years prices. Still waiting on the new catalog from Berlin Seeds Berlin Seeds | Ohio Amish Country . They do not have a website to order from like Holmes Seeds, but the link above shows contact info by phone to order their catalog. They also have canning supplies, and carry the Superb brand canning lids which in my opinion are much better than the Ball brand. Ball sold out, and quality has slipped quite a bit. Many people have been buying the Superb brand lids from Lehman's Hardware Kidron Store - Lehman's (lehmans.com) , an Amish hardware you can order from online. Berlin Seeds sell the same sleeve of 50 lids, for $9.00 less. Lehman's is a great hardware to get hard to find items, but is somewhat of a tourist trap for this region in Ohio.

I've had very good germination with seeds from both vendors. If anyone grows cabbage, I highly recommend the "Greenboy" from Holmes Seeds. I had a 99% germination rate with that seed, and made very nice heads of cabbage, great for making Sauerkraut. With all of the rain we had last year none split when ready to harvest. I did have one split in my hand that had gone beyond harvest stage, that I cut for a friend for a casserole. It was used immediately, so no harm done. They are advertised as making 4-6 lb. heads, but I had some as large as 10.5 lbs. Most averaged 8+ lbs.
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Some one needed to start the season so here it is 2022 has past and 2023 is here.
My we all have a good growing season.
They say everything is bigger in Texas.Well I guess that's how we are with lawns and gardens in Texas.We have a East Texas sand hill farm.Wife & Me living in a 50 x 60 Metal Barn Home.Our yard I used t-post & live stock panels guess size is more of less 125' x 125' never measured it.The garden is more or less 60 x 90.It's inside the yard.So is all that considered small medium or large?Yes we have our fair share of pest too.Got lots of gophers in the yard and garden.Got problem with rats & mice getting in vehicles atv chewing wires.No problem with *****,squirrels,wild pigs or deer.But got some coyotes and think it might be a cat somewhere roams the area.So need some suggestions on those gophers mice and garden in sugar sand.Oh got grass burs.Anyone tried the herbicides recommended for treating them?
 

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They say everything is bigger in Texas.Well I guess that's how we are with lawns and gardens in Texas.We have a East Texas sand hill farm.Wife & Me living in a 50 x 60 Metal Barn Home.Our yard I used t-post & live stock panels guess size is more of less 125' x 125' never measured it.The garden is more or less 60 x 90.It's inside the yard.So is all that considered small medium or large?Yes we have our fair share of pest too.Got lots of gophers in the yard and garden.Got problem with rats & mice getting in vehicles atv chewing wires.No problem with *,squirrels,wild pigs or deer.But got some coyotes and think it might be a cat somewhere roams the area.So need some suggestions on those gophers mice and garden in sugar sand.Oh got grass burs.Anyone tried the herbicides recommended for treating them?
Ugh, we get these miserable things in Michigan. Heard them called "cockle burr" or Thistle burr. Either way they are miserable to get out of clothing or worse, out of the dog's fur.
Plant Insect Arthropod Pollinator Burdock
 
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They say everything is bigger in Texas.Well I guess that's how we are with lawns and gardens in Texas.We have a East Texas sand hill farm.Wife & Me living in a 50 x 60 Metal Barn Home.Our yard I used t-post & live stock panels guess size is more of less 125' x 125' never measured it.The garden is more or less 60 x 90.It's inside the yard.So is all that considered small medium or large?Yes we have our fair share of pest too.Got lots of gophers in the yard and garden.Got problem with rats & mice getting in vehicles atv chewing wires.No problem with *,squirrels,wild pigs or deer.But got some coyotes and think it might be a cat somewhere roams the area.So need some suggestions on those gophers mice and garden in sugar sand.Oh got grass burs.Anyone tried the herbicides recommended for treating them?
Mower works great or are they the never get far off the ground type?
You in the hill country or the flat lands as north east Texas has a little of both.
How about that tumble weed?
 
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