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Yeah, I don't have that problem. Confirmed bachelor here... Came really close to tying the knot one time, but her saying, "What you need to do..." pretty much fixed that, 'cause she didn't have a clue as to "what I need to do... LOL....
Mine told me just agree and then go do what you want thats what she expects , she done well by the tomatoes last year .
 

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Yeah, I don't have that problem. Confirmed bachelor here... Came really close to tying the knot one time, but her saying, "What you need to do..." pretty much fixed that, 'cause she didn't have a clue as to "what I need to do... LOL....
That sounds a whole lot like our oldest son.
 

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Apparently the cabbage seed I got last year is losing it's viability, so scattered half of what was left in the pack in a tray of seed starting media, and put it in the germination chamber I made. Like the other seed of the same I put in a week or so ago, it was up this big in 64 hours. I'm loving this thing..!!

I'm experimenting with planting by moon phases this year. First planting was in the correct phase, this one is not. Starting tomorrow the12th,it is time to start above ground plants, so will start another tray with the seed that is left. I expect the same germination, but will set, and mark the difference in the 2 batches, and see if there is a difference at the end of the summer.
2498667
 

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Well I decided enough was enough. I finally got my garden started.

Growing up we always had large gardens but I never took to it. I had to help rototill, plant, weed, harvest and composting. My wife and I tried a small garden at our first house in 2007 or 2008 but we were busy and it never took off.

Well I am almost 40 and I figured there is no time like the present. We have since moved and live on 10 acres in the country, so space is plentiful. We are starting small, plotted about 30x40'.

Last fall I skimmed the sod off and leveled 6 yard carts of old manure. Our fall was extremely short and the ground frozen to quick for further work.

So we added some old leaves and tilled it all up. Found a few rocks but nothing crazy. We have fairly silty soil and not much if any clay. I will haul in another 6 yard carts this week and will till one more time prior to seeding. Most of the seeding will be done in May as Saskatchewan has quite a short season. We are just doing basics this year, potatoes, corn, beans, peas, lettuce and get a berry patch.

The garden may expand and we are also setting up for chickens next year.
2498753
 

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Well I decided enough was enough. I finally got my garden started.

Growing up we always had large gardens but I never took to it. I had to help rototill, plant, weed, harvest and composting. My wife and I tried a small garden at our first house in 2007 or 2008 but we were busy and it never took off.

Well I am almost 40 and I figured there is no time like the present. We have since moved and live on 10 acres in the country, so space is plentiful. We are starting small, plotted about 30x40'.

Last fall I skimmed the sod off and leveled 6 yard carts of old manure. Our fall was extremely short and the ground frozen to quick for further work.

So we added some old leaves and tilled it all up. Found a few rocks but nothing crazy. We have fairly silty soil and not much if any clay. I will haul in another 6 yard carts this week and will till one more time prior to seeding. Most of the seeding will be done in May as Saskatchewan has quite a short season. We are just doing basics this year, potatoes, corn, beans, peas, lettuce and get a berry patch.

The garden may expand and we are also setting up for chickens next year. View attachment 2498753
That is still a good size for two people.
 

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I am hoping plowing can commence next week. Still to muddy with more rain in the forecast for the weekend. We have peppers and tomato's ready to go out. If all fails I will just up them in some larger containers as they should be fine for awhile in 1-1/2 gal. pots. Will have to get some potting soil and wash the pots before transplanting.
 

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Actually part of why I am gardening is to include my 11 and 12 year old daughters. Its nice to work on some projects with them. My oldest hates it but my youngest loves it.
 

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Actually part of why I am gardening is to include my 11 and 12 year old daughters. Its nice to work on some projects with them. My oldest hates it but my youngest loves it.
Will go out on a limb and say I bet that 12 year old likes to eat. Your right she needs to learn were that food comes from. We have two grand daughter that way also. One likes to get out and get dirty. Follows dad every where on the farm. With the other it just will not happen.

We have frost warning for the next week. Temperatures in the low 30's. Potted plants are still under cover but out side kind of. In an unheated area anyway. Believe they should be all right.
 

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Yep, these kids love to eat, you bet they need to learn where it comes from!

We are still below freezing at night, the south east part of the province had one heck of a snow storm the other day.

Just doing some reading and it seems mid may I will be planting.
 

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Things I learned from last year # 1 cow horn okra can be pickeled but crimson spineless is better for pickeling ,# 2 if you get field soil you may get weed with it or will , # 3 if you get a irrigation kit buy stops and splice kits also .
 

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Haven't read through this (or prior years') thread in a while, and have let the garden go dormant for a few years.

But, I just bought a Titan Ripper to assist the TB Horse tiller (to get the first pass or two done). My 30x30 garden may not be big enough, and I haven't found a cheap Brinly moldboard sleeve hitch plow, so I'll give this a shot.

As mentioned, we haven't gardened in a few years. In the past, I had best luck with tomatoes and green beans.

The first year or two, I also grew nice zucchini and yellow squash. After that, we had some sort of white mold that seemed to keep them from growing the vegetables.

Hit or miss with cukes, almost no luck with pumpkins.

Horrible luck with peppers, regardless of variety.

Can't grow corn (sounding like Brian Regan here)...


Mike
 

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Haven't read through this (or prior years') thread in a while, and have let the garden go dormant for a few years.

But, I just bought a Titan Ripper to assist the TB Horse tiller (to get the first pass or two done). My 30x30 garden may not be big enough, and I haven't found a cheap Brinly moldboard sleeve hitch plow, so I'll give this a shot.

As mentioned, we haven't gardened in a few years. In the past, I had best luck with tomatoes and green beans.

The first year or two, I also grew nice zucchini and yellow squash. After that, we had some sort of white mold that seemed to keep them from growing the vegetables.

Hit or miss with cukes, almost no luck with pumpkins.

Horrible luck with peppers, regardless of variety.

Can't grow corn (sounding like Brian Regan here)...


Mike
I think the earth worms turn the soil over in a certain amount of years , in a small spot you could keep it covered some or all of it when not in use , I think you can rotate clear to sterilize the ground , to maby black plastic or maby fabric to breath on off season , maby mulch over fabric when not in use uncover what you need .
 

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I use leaves, and grass I've mowed off the lawn for mulch around my set plants, once they get tall enough to do so. If you use grass, be sure to cut it before seed heads form. I put the leaves down 4" to 6" deep. They will break down pretty much into compost by next year, and I turn it under with a moldboard plow. That in turn adds organic matter, and draws nigh crawlers, and red worms, which add worm castings high in nitrogen.

If you use a tiller, don't till it repeatedly, and make the dirt super fine, that destroys the soil structure. When tilling out weeds, only till about 2" deep, just enough to kill/uproot the weeds. I need to cultivate about every 3-4 days, especially after a rain. Tilling any deeper once again destroys soil structure, brings up more weed seed, and may kill worms which provide natural fertilizer.

I plowed mine on Apr. 5th, and could really tell the difference in what I had 4-5 years ago, just from adding the leaves. It was pretty decent dirt to begin with, but is getting better. Literally hundreds of worms showing when I rolled it over. A good sign of good healthy soil.

This garden plot is as old as I am, its been a garden spot since 1954. Dad added manure, and planted cereal Rye for years to build nutrients, and organic matter, and I still do the same. I save the horse manure I get from my horses in a pile, and compost it, then spread it on in late Fall, or over the Winter.

I turned it over this year with my new to me toy, a hillside/2-way plow I got over the Winter. for my little IH 140. Since the garden has a good bit of slope to it, I always roll it uphill. The 2-way plow saves deadheading back to the other end to make another pass. I also have one for my Super C Farmall, but it takes about 30 minutes to hook it up, connecting the auto-flip function. This one, you just grab a lever to rotate the plow. I love it..!!
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2499081
 

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I prepare my soil following this technique I learned in the late 70s / early 80s from my Dad's friend who gardened an acre-sized plot, primarily using a TB Horse.

First, I till to loosen the soil. I go in one direction for the first pass (half depth), then set the tiller deeper and go 90 degrees across for the second pass.

Next, I add as many leaves as I have available (I usually have enough to cover the whole garden at least 1-3 inches deep) and till that in. I don't use grass clippings, as the lawn chemical warning labels scare me.

Finally, I lay out peat moss down each row and till that in. For rows getting directly seeded, I'll add cow manure at this step and till it in with the peat moss.

For rows getting potted plant transplants, I add the cow manure (and some fertilizer) to each hole, and mix that into the soil by hand before dropping the plant in. This is to minimize how much I spend on cow manure.

For mulch, I use peat moss.

Suggestions for improvements to this plan, especially anything to make zucchini, yellow squash, cukes and peppers grow better, are welcome.

Mike
 
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I prepare my soil following this technique I learned in the late 70s / early 80s from my Dad's friend who gardened an acre-sized plot, primarily using a TB Horse.

First, I till to loosen the soil. I go in one direction for the first pass (half depth), then set the tiller deeper and go 90 degrees across for the second pass.

Next, I add as many leaves as I have available (I usually have enough to cover the whole garden at least 1-3 inches deep) and till that in. I don't use grass clippings, as the lawn chemical warning labels scare me.

Finally, I lay out peat moss down each row and till that in. For rows getting directly seeded, I'll add cow manure at this step and till it in with the peat moss.

For rows getting potted plant transplants, I add the cow manure (and some fertilizer) to each hole, and mix that into the soil by hand before dropping the plant in.

For mulch, I use peat moss.

Suggestions for improvements to this plan, especially anything to make zucchini, yellow squash, cakes and peppers grow better, are welcome.

Mike
We tried white squash its pretty good . I don't have any pete moss unless I buy it . We have a clay soil here i just do a minimum till like for beans say if I follow another crop I don't plow every year I hit and miss .
 

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We tried white squash its pretty good . I don't have any pete moss unless I buy it . We have a clay soil here i just do a minimum till like for beans say if I follow another crop I don't plow every year I hit and miss .
@Bebop , I'm in Michigan and we battle clay here too. Where abouts are you located?
 

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Not sure that I mentioned it here, but...

The ground here is awful. There's forest litter, under that is mostly rock with sand in between. Some clumps of clay, not much.

I know this because to create this garden (around 2006/2007), I had to drop trees, and dug out the stumps with a backhoe.

I then tried tilling that, and only succeeded in being dragged around by the TB Horse tiller.

So, I had some compost/loam brought in, have a good 8-12 inch base of that now. I did this in two waves, a total of 20-30 yards were needed to make the garden its current 30x30 foot size.

Mike
 
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