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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am still having an issue with my '70 model 2000. After 30-45 minutes of hard use, the tractor sputters and dies. I've changed the coil (twice), today I had the chance to check the spark after it died. Nice hot spark to the plugs.
I cracked the fuel line connection at the sediment bowl because it didn't look full. I tried cranking the tractor to check for fuel flow from the pump, at first I had a dribble/spurt then nothing. I also pulled the bowl drain on the carb, no gas. I'm thinking bad fuel pump, any other ideas.

Thanks,
 

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I believe you may be on to something since you know the spark is nice and hot. Have you checked your fuel tank for something that may be floating around in there and covering you fuel outlet?
 

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My fuel filter clogged up with sediment twice on me this afternoon. I have a auxilary fuel filter which is one of those clear glass ones from the auto store. I thought my tank was fairly clean. It did the same thing as what you described, sputtered & died. I also have a little fuel pressure gauge that connects in the fuel line and I can monitor pressure, it was only $10. It stays around 4 lbs of pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think the tank outlet is ok. I broke the connection at the tank shut off valve & had good fuel flow. Is there a sure fire way to check the pump? Also, is there a reason to not replace the sediment bowl with an in line filter?

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Your fuel pump should put out about 3/4 to 1 pint a minute. Disconnect the fuel line at the carb and run the engine about one minute with a can or ,my preference, a glass jar to catch the fuel. If the pump is working correctly it should put out enough fuel ;ie 3/4 to 1 pint.
Dave
P.S.
If you have a diesel, this does not apply.
 

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Old Guy With Old Toys
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If there has been any modification, addition of filters, or re-routing of any fuel line consider you may be getting vapor lock. I suspected this new government mandated gas is not as old machine friendly as the old formula. May be a bit more subject to vapor lock as well as the other problems.
 

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Traded some troubleshooting techniques with a retired Carter Carburetor engineer years ago. He told me that their check of a fuel pump was to hook a vacuum gauge to the INPUT side of the pump & observe vacuum while engine ran. A pass was vacuum equal to atmospheric pressure (14.7" Hg @ sea level + desired fuel pump pressure (psi). So, for 5 psi you'd want to see ~19.7"Hg. I thought it was neat. I explained to him how to adjust a GM feedback carburetor for 50% duty cycle using a dwell meter set on 6 cylinder dwell & shooting for a 30 degree figure. He then told me that Carter had a feedback system working in 1957, but it was as big as a suitcase & cost $300 additional. With gas at what, 22cents a gallon?, there naturally weren't ANY takers. Amazing how quickly technology goes out of date. I heard from a trusted source that E10 gas will boil at 171 degrees. Might think on adding a 'plate' of gasket material (or thin metal) between the carb & manifold for a heat shield. Some tractor & industrial engines had sock type screens in either the carb fuel inlet fitting, or in the upstream side of the seat (of needle & seat). Might be worth a look if the search for blocked fuel tank vents &/or other blocked screens/filters yields no joy. Clogged screens tend to act like bad coils, run great initially, but roughen up & die after some use (screen blocked), but after a 'cool down', the debris falls away from the screen allowing decent operation again.
 
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