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I need to remove my power steering cylinder in order to have it rebuilt. My tractor is a 2 Wheel Dr. and it seems all you need to do is remove one nut from each side where the cylinder is attached to the front axle. I removed these nuts but cannot budge the bolts (the top of the bolts are embedded in what appears to be a ball and socket joint that is attached to the cylinder). I have attempted to attach a photograph of the left side showing where I removed the nut. Any suggestions on how to proceed would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Those aren't separate bolts, they are part of the ball joints on the ends of the cylinder. If the cylinder still has hydraulic pressure in it, either expanding or compressing pressure, then the studs at the ball joints at the ends of the cylinder are going to be under tension and won't easily slide out of the holes in the gussets of the axle and rod. With the engine off, try working the steering wheel back and forth to try to release any pressure in the cylinder. If that doesn't do it, then you may need to loosen the fittings where the hydraulic lines attach to the cylinder. Be careful that your skin isn't anywhere that it could get hit by high pressure hydraulic fluid while you're loosening the fittings. You want to be able to easily slide the cylinder open and closed just a little in order to release any sideways tension on those studs, and once the tension is gone, the studs should slide out of the holes. They will still be part of the ball joint in the end of the cylinder, but they should come out of the holes in the axle and rod gussets.
 

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Those are tapered bolts to boot, and are often difficult to separate.

Good penetrating oil and tapping on the cast iron eye, don't get crazy either.
A Pickle Fork can be helpful. but be careful, you need to reuse that end.

Some pressure between wile tapping often works.

DS
 

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1981 Ford 1100 4WD
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For the novice: A pickle fork looks like a pry bar except it has a tapered fork on the end. It's inserted at the ball joint end of the cylinder and you hit the end with a hammer. The wedge effect pops the cylinder from the axle. Local auto parts will have one.
 
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