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I bought a 1956 IH 300 utility back in May and the guy I purchased it from gave a extra flywheel.
Now I have found out the reason he gave me the extra flywheel.
The flywheel starter teeth are going bad.
Would have nice if he would have told me that.
It seemed odd he gave me a spare flywheel.
Anyway what would cause the flywheel starter teeth to go bad?
How much would it cost to hire someone to split the tractor to change the flywheel?
Did the flywheel go bad because it was converted 6 volt to 12 volt by the previous owner and it couldn't take the extra power?
I know it's the flywheel starter teeth because if I turn the motor over by hand to move off the ground down spot it rolls over and starts.
 

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First off, on a 4 cyl. engine, it will normally stop in 2 places. So when you are starting the engine, the starter engages the flywheel ring gear, in one of those 2 places. I'd be surprised as old as it is, that the starter hasn't been replaced, or at least rebuilt, including the drive gear on the starter, due to wear. A starter getting worn, or even a low battery may not engage as it should, and cause damage to the ring gear on the flywheel, not meshing properly.

Depending on what kind of condition the extra flywheel is in, all you would really need to do, is change out the ring gear. That is done by blocking the flywheel up off the floor, then heating the ring gear to approx. a dull cherry red, with an acetylene torch, and lightly tapping it off with a hammer, going around the ring gear a bit at a time. That is if the spare ring gear is in decent shape. The only problem I'd have with changing out the other flywheel is, you don't really have any idea, unless it is pretty clean, if it needs taken to a machine shop, and refaced. If the clutch engages pretty smooth on the one you have, you probably don't need to have it done. If it doesn't engage smoothly, then it'd be an idea to get it done, while it's apart. If it's been a loader tractor all of it's life, there's a good change the clutch and flywheel have been hot more than several times, slipping the clutch, loading material.

I really don't have any idea what it would cost to have that done, but local independent dealers charge no less than $85 per hour shop rate. I'd have to guess a minimum of 8-10 hours, more if they have to remove the loader.

Splitting the tractor isn't all that hard, if you have a decent concrete floor, a good floor jack, and some cribbing, and tools to do the job. A decent tool set, you can carry in a hand tool box from say like Craftsman, with combination wrenches, 1/2 drive socket set, and a torque wrench, to properly torque flywheel bolts, etc. should do the job. As far as the ring gear, maybe one of your buddies has a torch, or a weld shop could change it out for you for a few bucks. Certainly, a lot less than a torch & tank set.

A I&T manual, although have a lot to be desired, should guide you through splitting the tractor, and reassembly, with proper torque specs.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
First off, on a 4 cyl. engine, it will normally stop in 2 places. So when you are starting the engine, the starter engages the flywheel ring gear, in one of those 2 places. I'd be surprised as old as it is, that the starter hasn't been replaced, or at least rebuilt, including the drive gear on the starter, due to wear. A starter getting worn, or even a low battery may not engage as it should, and cause damage to the ring gear on the flywheel, not meshing properly.

Depending on what kind of condition the extra flywheel is in, all you would really need to do, is change out the ring gear. That is done by blocking the flywheel up off the floor, then heating the ring gear to approx. a dull cherry red, with an acetylene torch, and lightly tapping it off with a hammer, going around the ring gear a bit at a time. That is if the spare ring gear is in decent shape. The only problem I'd have with changing out the other flywheel is, you don't really have any idea, unless it is pretty clean, if it needs taken to a machine shop, and refaced. If the clutch engages pretty smooth on the one you have, you probably don't need to have it done. If it doesn't engage smoothly, then it'd be an idea to get it done, while it's apart. If it's been a loader tractor all of it's life, there's a good change the clutch and flywheel have been hot more than several times, slipping the clutch, loading material.

I really don't have any idea what it would cost to have that done, but local independent dealers charge no less than $85 per hour shop rate. I'd have to guess a minimum of 8-10 hours, more if they have to remove the loader.

Splitting the tractor isn't all that hard, if you have a decent concrete floor, a good floor jack, and some cribbing, and tools to do the job. A decent tool set, you can carry in a hand tool box from say like Craftsman, with combination wrenches, 1/2 drive socket set, and a torque wrench, to properly torque flywheel bolts, etc. should do the job. As far as the ring gear, maybe one of your buddies has a torch, or a weld shop could change it out for you for a few bucks. Certainly, a lot less than a torch & tank set.

A I&T manual, although have a lot to be desired, should guide you through splitting the tractor, and reassembly, with proper torque specs.
The starter has been replaced before.
I can tell because it says 12 volt on it.
I do have a I&T manual for it.
I didn't know the ring gear could be replaced.
The clutch works but I does have some trouble changing gears it grinds occasionally.
It helps if I set the engine throttle higher to stop it from grinding.
So my main worry is that flywheel ring gear will continually get worse and it won't start.
Will it get worse or because its a 4 cylinder and the engine only lands on 2 spots I can keep it going with the pipe wrench and moving it off the bad spot on the ring gear?
I attached a pic of the ring gear.
 

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It might be possible to build up the worn teeth with a MIG welder and file them back to the same height as the un-worn ones to buy you more time...
I had a truck with two teeth chipped off the flex plate and was able to have that done and avoid replacing it till winter was over--but it worked well enough I didn't bother to fix it,ended up selling it a year later the way it was..(and I told the buyer about it,he wasn't too concerned about it,he was better able to replace it than I was)..
 

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The starter has been replaced before.
I can tell because it says 12 volt on it.
I do have a I&T manual for it.
I didn't know the ring gear could be replaced.
The clutch works but I does have some trouble changing gears it grinds occasionally.
It helps if I set the engine throttle higher to stop it from grinding.
So my main worry is that flywheel ring gear will continually get worse and it won't start.
Will it get worse or because its a 4 cylinder and the engine only lands on 2 spots I can keep it going with the pipe wrench and moving it off the bad spot on the ring gear?
I attached a pic of the ring gear.
If the teeth on the starter are good, sure, you can turn the engine over to get away from the bad teeth on the ring gear, as long as it starts easily, and don't have to crank it over too much. It may disengage when it gets to the bad teeth, and damage the teeth on the starter. That could get tiresome after awhile though, up to you...

If the I&T doesn't cover changing the ring gear, I'm sure there are numerous youtube video's on how to do it. I think they're pretty much all the same, as far as changing them out. Just be sure the beveled edge is towards the starter.

Just be sure when you change gears, you are at a complete stop. Those are straight cut gears, not synchromesh, like auto/truck transmissions. Check to make sure you have proper free travel on the clutch pedal. I'm thinking 7/8" to 1" of free travel, from the out position, until you can feel it start to exert pressure on the release bearing.
 

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Umm...
Wouldn't a "4" cylinder engine have 4 worn spots on the ring gear?
One for every time one of the 4 pistons came up on a compression stroke and stopped the rotation of the crank & flywheel after the ignition was turned off?
Would not the same hold true on a 6 cylinder engine?
Just thinking out loud, something I should never do.
 

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Umm...
Wouldn't a "4" cylinder engine have 4 worn spots on the ring gear?
One for every time one of the 4 pistons came up on a compression stroke and stopped the rotation of the crank & flywheel after the ignition was turned off?
Would not the same hold true on a 6 cylinder engine?
Just thinking out loud, something I should never do.
Nope, stops in 2 places. 6 cyl. 3, and a V-8 in 4. On a 4 cyl, 2 pistons, 1 & 4, and the other 2, 2 & 3 travel in unison. Yes, they will stop on a compression stroke, either on 1 & 4, or on 2 & 3, making it stop in 2 places.
 

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It might be possible to build up the worn teeth with a MIG welder and file them back to the same height as the un-worn ones to buy you more time...
I had a truck with two teeth chipped off the flex plate and was able to have that done and avoid replacing it till winter was over--but it worked well enough I didn't bother to fix it,ended up selling it a year later the way it was..(and I told the buyer about it,he wasn't too concerned about it,he was better able to replace it than I was)..
I knew a guy that built up the flywheel teeth for the pony motor on his D7 Cat and ground them back to shape with a die grinder.
They worked for several years til he sold it.
 
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