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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just saw an add for what appears to be a very nice 1953 Ford Jubilee "fully restored, painted and new tires". Picture "looks" nice to an uniformed viewer.

My understanding is the Jubilee replaced the 8N??? What are the benefits of a Jubilee over an 8N...also how many years does the Jubilee cover? Does it have a number series or just Jubilee?

What would selling prices be for what appears to be a nice '53 Jubilee...after verifying the state of restoration??

Asking price is $7K...a bit high? or ???

I see lots of 8N...are Jubilee's less common?

Thanks all...Tom R
 

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Old 'n Cheap
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Seems high to me. I don't doubt that it would be easy to get 7K and more in a restoration done right along with all the hours of labor. I have a brother that deals in late model pickups and he says if you get a little more in one than you should have go ahead and price it high. Someone will eventually buy it.

I believe a true Jubilee was only made as a 53 model. Some were manufactured in 52 , but sold as a 53. There was also some Golden Jubilees made as dealer promotions if my memory is right. One of the more knowledgeable Jubilee guys will be along directly to fill you in on all the facts and maybe to correct my memory.
 

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The NAA Golden Jubilee was made for the Golden Anniversary (50th anniversary) of the Ford Motor Company... in 1953... and 1953 alone. Now... the NAA tractor is (for all intents and purposes) identical to the Golden Jubilee... with a slightly different emblem.

The NAA has an overhead valve engine... with about 32 (or so) horsepower (as compared to the 8N's flathead engine and 28 or so horsepower). The NAA also has an engine driven hydraulic pump (giving the NAA live hydraulic power) versus the 8N's PTO driven hydraulic pump.

Oh... and in my book... $7,000 should buy you 2 GOOD condition NAA's....
 

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Just saw an add for what appears to be a very nice 1953 Ford Jubilee "fully restored, painted and new tires". Picture "looks" nice to an uniformed viewer.

My understanding is the Jubilee replaced the 8N??? What are the benefits of a Jubilee over an 8N...also how many years does the Jubilee cover? Does it have a number series or just Jubilee?

What would selling prices be for what appears to be a nice '53 Jubilee...after verifying the state of restoration??

Asking price is $7K...a bit high? or ???

I see lots of 8N...are Jubilee's less common?

Thanks all...Tom R
Ditto on what Steve has said.

how many years does the Jubilee cover? Does it have a number series or just Jubilee?
1952 Serial number NAA 00001 - NAA 04929
1953 Serial number NAA 04930 - NAA 77474


Check out the info on John Smith's Site. :fing32:
 

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Down here outside the Charleston, South Carolina area. You can pick one up for around 3,500-5,000. $7,000 would have to be extremely perfect show room condition, you would park it in you air conditioned barn as part of your tractor collection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Check out the info on John Smith's Site. :fing32:
Thanks...that is a great summary!

My attraction to the early Fords is the compact size, the relative simplicity, the utility AND the price.

Reading the flow of models from the 8N, the Jubilee, the NAA and on up thru the "number" models...at what point do the get significantly larger, more complex and begin to cost say...more than $7,500 in real nice condition??

Mt thought is they probably have improvements along the way and later may be a bit better??

Do attachments tend to fit most/all series??

Thanks...just learning...Tom R
 

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...at what point do the get significantly larger, more complex and begin to cost say...more than $7,500 in real nice condition??
Really... not until you get into the 'later' thousand series, the 4000's and 5000's specifically, for larger and closer to $7,500. As to more complex... the SOS transmission (introduced in 1959) is more complex than a standard transmission. Diesel engines (also introduced in 1959) have added complexity as compared to gas.

My thought is they probably have improvements along the way and later may be a bit better??
As mentioned before... the NAA offered live hydraulics which was a vast improvement over the 8N's PTO driven hydraulics. In mid year 1955 the engine driven hydraulic pump on the hundred series tractors was improved... and speaking of 1955, this was the first year that Ford offered more than one tractor model per year. There were several variations of the tractor (follow the link in my signature for details) that offered several improvements, including live PTO, power steering, diesel engines and an "automatic" transmission (with independent PTO).

Do attachments tend to fit most/all series??
All of the N's (9N/2N/8N), NAA's and hundred series tractors have a Category I 3-point hitch, so... yes, implements are standard implements that can still be purchased new. Once you get into some of the larger thousand series tractors (4000, 5000, 6000) then you start seeing some Category II 3-point hitches... which can take larger implements, but... MOST of your Cat I implements can still be used with "adapter" bushings.
 

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Old 'n Cheap
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Thanks...that is a great summary!

My attraction to the early Fords is the compact size, the relative simplicity, the utility AND the price.

Reading the flow of models from the 8N, the Jubilee, the NAA and on up thru the "number" models...at what point do the get significantly larger, more complex and begin to cost say...more than $7,500 in real nice condition??

Mt thought is they probably have improvements along the way and later may be a bit better??

Do attachments tend to fit most/all series??

Thanks...just learning...Tom R

It might be more helpful if you have in mind for what chores you will be using the tractor. Some things will require more horsepower, while others may require a live PTO or multple hydraulic connections.
I would like to use a tiller with my 2N, but without a live PTO and too fast of a slowest gear it is not an easy thing. This is just an example of matching the tractor to the job.
 

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IMO, in todays market the $7K is getting up there but still not out of reason. Nice Jubs have sold for more. If a restoration is done right, the person has that much or much more invested in the tractor. I have one restored to show quality that I restored in 2003 that I would take $5500. See avatar.
IMO, the biggest advantage of the NAA over an N is live hydraulics. BTW, the NAA is a two year only model production, 1953-1954. As stated above, some early Jubs were built in 1952. Many parts of the NAA are backwards and forward compatable to other models. They are good little tractors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Curious as to size difference between a Jubilee and a 1959 601?

I called on what appears to be an excellent total restoration of a '59 "641" w/live PTO...seems like the 1959 has many improvements over the 1953-54 Jubilee? BTW...the "641" is defined as 4 speed/3 pt/non-live PTO...but the owner is from family of original owner and says the 641 live PTO was a rare configuration?

Would I find the 1959 physically larger...much of my use is in the woods on trails...would there be much difference in size or "feel" of the two models?

BTW...both appear to be quite "restored" and asking prices are close...would seem to make sense to prefer 1959 "641" over 1953 Jubilee???

Thanks for the great input...a guy has to learn somewhere! Tom R
 

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Curious as to size difference between a Jubilee and a 1959 601?
Physically... they should be the same size. Same size tires. Same size engine.

...'59 "641" w/live PTO...
I haven't seen everything. I could have missed out on something, but... I'm not aware of any type of "rare" add-on that would give a 641 (or any "x4x" tractor) Live PTO. I'm not saying that it doesn't exist... just that I'm not aware of it.
As you stated... the 641 is, by definition, a transmission PTO tractor.

...would seem to make sense to prefer 1959 "641" over 1953 Jubilee???
I would agree... that personally... I would prefer a '59 641 over a '53 Jubilee, for a working tractor anyway. It's a newer tractor... and there were some improvements, i.e. upgraded hydraulic pump, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It might be more helpful if you have in mind for what chores you will be using the tractor. Some things will require more horsepower, while others may require a live PTO or multple hydraulic connections.
I would like to use a tiller with my 2N, but without a live PTO and too fast of a slowest gear it is not an easy thing. This is just an example of matching the tractor to the job.
1) Mow 3 acre field once a year...bush hog on 3 pt

2) Work in woods...on 1 mile+ of trails (bush hog), cutting and removing trees

3) Driveway (class 5)/trail maintenance...blade/box blade/grooming

4) Pull trailer w/debris, etc

5) Grandkid rides :)

Part of desire is also to own an early tractor partly as a hobby...Tom R
 

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My opinion is either of the two tractors you are looking at would do the job. You might want to mow that three acres a couple times a year so the grass doesn't get too far ahead of you. The live PTO would be a good thing to have.
I wouldn't ride the grandkids on the tractor, but in a trailer is great. They will love that.
Just a warning. What ever tractor you decide on will probably not be the last one you get. Some where out there is probably an "N" just waitin on you to come get it. They are easy to work on and relatively inexpensive as long as the major components are in reasonably good condition. I picked up a pair of rough looking 2Ns for $1000. One even had new rear tires. A little work and both ran without smoke or leaks. I use the one in my avatar to mow the better part of 10 acres weekly. Counting the purchase price, the new front tires, brakes and paint I probably have less than $800 in it. When the wife comes up with a make work honey-do I can always say "I'd love to , but I have some work to do on the tractor before I mow".

There are quite a few good bargains out there, so don't be too quick to pull the trigger.

Good luck with your decision.
 

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I'd agree with ryork about the trailer and givin' the grandkids rides. That being said... on occasion I do give my daughter a ride on the tractor (but not while I'm working it).

As to your other stated uses... an 8N would do fine... as would either the NAA or the 641. The live hydraulics are a definite plus, but... not really a requirement.
 

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In the 601 series tractors the 661 was the one with a live PTO and it had a 5 speed tranny. Now there was an aftermarket live PTO for the NAA that may have been adapted to this tractor at some point in its life. The live PTO kit put a clutch pack between the transmission output shaft and the differential and had a handle on the left side of the tractor by the seat for hand operation of the clutch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
In the 601 series tractors the 661 was the one with a live PTO and it had a 5 speed tranny. Now there was an aftermarket live PTO for the NAA that may have been adapted to this tractor at some point in its life. The live PTO kit put a clutch pack between the transmission output shaft and the differential and had a handle on the left side of the tractor by the seat for hand operation of the clutch.
Having just read the great summary of configurations by year linked in one of the threads regarding 601 model differences (ie 641) I questioned the owner who said it was a rare combination but actual. Tractor part of family since new. Seems very knowledgeable and is just completing the restoration and sale of 8 family tractors...two left are fully restored 8N and the 641.

If I speak with him again I will ask further questions...BTW...he is a member of MTF...Thanks...Tom R
 

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The Ford Jubilee/NAA was kinda like Henry's old model T Ford, just about every farm had one or more. Extremely universal and could be adapted for just about any farm chore. I think it was the most popular tractor ever built! From 1954 on, it took the name 600 up to and including the 800 series. The cheapest model, if my memory serves me right, was the 620 and had no PTO or hydraulics. and was mainly used for pulling wagons or tow bar equipment. Early models had a 4 speed transmission, later models had a 5 speed and optional external hydraulics. Not all had a Proof meter, you could buy one without it. Improved hydraulics and optional power steering came later. My tractor is a 55 640 and even though it's used very little, it can pull a 6 foot bush hog all day long in 2nd gear without straining. I have other more powerful tractors, but this is like a quiet little sports car. I wouldn't sell it for anything. PJ

 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The Ford Jubilee/NAA was kinda like Henry's old model T Ford, just about every farm had one or more. Extremely universal and could be adapted for just about any farm chore. I think it was the most popular tractor ever built! From 1954 on, it took the name 600 up to and including the 800 series. The cheapest model, if my memory serves me right, was the 620 and had no PTO or hydraulics. and was mainly used for pulling wagons or tow bar equipment. Early models had a 4 speed transmission, later models had a 5 speed and optional external hydraulics. Not all had a Proof meter, you could buy one without it. Improved hydraulics and optional power steering came later. My tractor is a 55 640 and even though it's used very little, it can pull a 6 foot bush hog all day long in 2nd gear without straining. I have other more powerful tractors, but this is like a quiet little sports car. I wouldn't sell it for anything. PJ

Thanks Paul...so do I get this right? The 600-800 series is still the same frame as the 8N/NAA??

What year does the basic Ford tractor get a larger frame and begin the upward size march?

I do believe the attraction to the early Ford tractors (for me) is the low weight and "small" size. But I would like to target later years if you get the size/weight benefit with a bit more updated engine/drivetrain?

Were the 2000/4000 1962-1964 still the same frame and basic weight structure as the 8N (I am sure they gained a few #s) ????

I guess my question is...how late a model year is still from the basic 8N frame family???

Thanks All...Tom R
 
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