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Discussion Starter #1
Ok fellas. I have a mid 90s simplicity mower, that was repowered by a vanguard 18hp in the early 2000s. The battery died so I jumped it, and it started right up. As soon as I engaged the electric PTO, it stalls. As soon as I turn on any electronics, it stalls. I replaced the voltage regulator (twice) and the issue persists. Even off the new voltage regulator, I'm getting a reading of only 1 dc volt, which explains the battery drain and stalling. Off the stator/alternator wire, at full throttle, i get 26 ac volts. Is the issue the stator/alternator or something else. I can't figure out if I should be at 20 or 30 minimum ac volts
 

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Can't help you there but I can send you a Service Manual IF you would like. Address below, put in proper format and remind me engine model number and what you want.

Walt Conner
wconner5 at frontier dot com
 

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Check your electrical connections well, especially the grounds. Those electrons need to make a full lap.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The grounds are fine. I even checked power back to ignition switch.When on jump, off car, it easily passes power to everything and doesn't stall (until I remove the cables). Looking at some manuals and my vanguard model number, I believe my stator is 16amp. So, I don't know if 26 ACV (at full throttle) is enough. Isthe issue under the flywheel at stator? The two wires from stator are black and plug into a yellow connector to regulator. There is a single red wire coming off the regulator back to battery. Very little voltage coming off that regulator (like 1 dc volt). I do t think the issue is the regulator since I tried 2 brand new units
 

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Check stator wires for continuity between them and each one to ground. Stator is basically just a length of wire wound into a coil. spinning magnets in flywheel induce an ac voltage into the coil. Should be maybe an ohm or so resistance in the windings and No continuity to ground. Need a decent meter and once you get the manual it should have actual specs. too low of an ohm reading could mean the windings are shorted internally, too high or open also bad. any path to ground on either wire is bad. 26v ac sounds low to me but I usually work on motorcycles, which may have 20-30v ac at idle and up to 90v ac at higher rpm. rare, but flywheel magnets can lose magnetism and give low ac voltages.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Walt, I emailed you this morning with my info. Email came from louofm1 at Yahoo dot com
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Check stator wires for continuity between them and each one to ground. Stator is basically just a length of wire wound into a coil. spinning magnets in flywheel induce an ac voltage into the coil. Should be maybe an ohm or so resistance in the windings and No continuity to ground. Need a decent meter and once you get the manual it should have actual specs. too low of an ohm reading could mean the windings are shorted internally, too high or open also bad. any path to ground on either wire is bad. 26v ac sounds low to me but I usually work on motorcycles, which may have 20-30v ac at idle and up to 90v ac at higher rpm. rare, but flywheel magnets can lose magnetism and give low ac voltages.
. Lane, I checked for continuity between the two stator wires and it was there. Ohm I believe we're low, at 1. There was no continuity between each wire to ground
 

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Have to get the manual, see what ohm reading it should be, (last Honda I did was 0.4 ohms per the book) takes a fairly accurate meter, if good, then check actual ac voltage coming out. go from there. If the ac voltage isn't there or is low, really can only be stator or flywheel magnets.

And 1 thing I've learned the hard way over the years, especially when it comes to electrical components, is the quantity on hand and/or the age of a component have absolutely NOTHING to do with whether a particular part is good or bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I feel like the biggest dummy. I went ahead and replaced the battery on mower (it was a couple of years old) and it now works just fine, even with the old voltage regulator. Runs at almost 15 volts, under load. With the old battery, after a jump, voltage regulator wasn't boosting voltage at all, and giving very low readings. I thought, I'd still read higher voltage after engine was running, even with a bad battery.
 
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