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Discussion Starter #1
I asked this question in another thread, but no-one ever responded. Has anyone come up with a good crankcase heater method to warm the oil?
Magnetic don't seem to be the answer. What is?
 

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I've used a trouble light in the past. Place it under the oil pan 30 minutes before you want to go plow snow.

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Right, for this application, you want all that waste heat :)

I've often used a 60 or 100 watt incandescent, in a work light holder. For extra warming, throw some sort of tarp over the machine. You can just leave the light on the ground somewhere under the engine. Works great.
 

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I have been using a Kat's Model 1153 200W magnetic heater on my Gravely powered w/b where the engine and trans share the same oil supply. Works nicely. I'll try it on my Kohler powered 8122 this winter.

Note current light bulbs are typically 60W EQUIVALENT OR 100W EQUIVALENT and are actually around half that wattage. You might be able to get a 75W Rough Service bulb (that is actually 75W) from a commercial electrical supply store that serves contractors.
 

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I assumed we were talking aluminum oil pan here, no?

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I assumed we were talking aluminum oil pan here, no?

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? A 16-G with a Kohler M18 twin has no separate oil pan, just the cast aluminum engine block.

What kind of temperatures, and what kind of tractor storage are we talking about here?

Kohler recommends 10W-30 for constant below 30 temperatures.

BUT, mine has always had SAE30 oil, stored in an insulated but not heated garage, never any trouble starting it, and no cold start engine problems. Had the heads off at 700 hours for de-carboning and still could see factory cross hatch in the bores.

I always let it warm up at 1/3 throttle in winter before asking it to do any work, and here in the Mid Atlantic temps below the teens are rare, high twenties more our typical lows.

But never any trouble that would have me heating the oil.

Sheldon
 

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I guess the OP will have to clarify if his 16G is M18 or B&S Vanguard powered. In any case, here in PA I run 10W-30 in the winter in the Robin EH65.

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Yes it would be nice to know which engine he has.

But I'm pretty sure all 16-G tractors had Kohler M-18's or Briggs Vangard engines.

The Robins engine came in 13.5 HP and 20.5 HP and was used on the last 14-G and 20-G tractors, models 987071 and 987072. The 18-G disappeared with the Kohler engines.

The model number of the last 16-G tractors remained 987070, which had appeared in the lineup with the Briggs engine before the Robins engines completely displaced the Kohler M-18 and M-20.

And, if I had a Robins engine, I would be running multi weight oil in winter to be sure. But flat head opposed cylinder engines generally don't like multi weight oil, so if you can avoid it without cold weather startup damage, you are better off.

Kohler made it clear way back then that if you run multi weight oil in the Magnums you will have more carbon buildup on the cylinder heads and valve stems.

In a perfect world, I would simply store the machine in a warmer environment, which is what I was always able to do. And, what I plan to be able to do soon at my new home.

Sheldon
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yes it is a M18 so is aluminum. I tried strapping a magnetic heater to it for a while maybe 45 min to an hour, but noticed little warming.
This is stored in an unheated detached garage. In N Michigan we are often in 20s or teens or colder. I want to warm the oil for sure.
 
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