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Former MTF Admin.
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys, long time no post, anyway had a nice Kubota scut and it got totaled. So now we got us a John Deere 1025r and been trying to learn how to use the float position to use the bucket on a snowy gravel driveway. From what I gleaned out of the manual it says to put push the lever forward when using the bucket and that is the float position, but I can not seem to make it work. It is digging into the gravel and I have to pull back on the lever, I thought if it was in float it would essentially just ride over any bumps in the road instead of digging into it. Am I thinking wrong or just don't actually have it in float ?.
 

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Premium Member
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3,478 Posts
Maybe check if is floating (perhaps try jacking it up in the float position)?
Maybe try adjusting the angle the bucket is so the bottom is more level?
 

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That Guy
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1,119 Posts
Might I suggest looking into Edge Tamers from R2 Manufacturing?


I absolutely love mine, they've made plowing a breeze. Just level the bucket and float it.

Snapchat-1028252402.jpg
 

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Administrator
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Hey Jim, nice to hear from you. Just a bit of mentioning something that I'm sure you already know. But for what it's worth and just to make sure all bases are covered, did you just push it forward, or do so with a quick snap and release so the valve clicks into float position? I believe that may do it for you. Good luck.
MikeC
 

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Former MTF Admin.
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Discussion Starter #5
Hey Jim, nice to hear from you. Just a bit of mentioning something that I'm sure you already know. But for what it's worth and just to make sure all bases are covered, did you just push it forward, or do so with a quick snap and release so the valve clicks into float position? I believe that may do it for you. Good luck.
MikeC
Hi Mike, good to hear from you too and yep I just shoved it forward and let go. I'll try the quick snap forward and release and see what happens, thanks for the tip :).
 

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Kioti SCUT
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370 Posts
I have a Kioti SCUT and had a problem going into float.

It turned out I was moving too slow when pushing the lever forward, and the bucket just kept moving down. I learned to "snap" the lever forward and hold it there until it stayed forward. Then it worked great.

I also have the Edge Tamers, and the Edge Extenders. I love them. Cal
2447284
 

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you have to push forward as if to lower the FEL... and then push some more past a "detent" which will have a definitive but gentle "click" to it when you get there... then you just let go - do not "pull it back"... just let go of the lever....

Additionally, you want to make sure the bucket bottom is parallel to the ground... if the bucket edge points down, it will dig in, even when floating.... I assume you know that though....

cheers!
 

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Former MTF Admin.
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Discussion Starter #9
you have to push forward as if to lower the FEL... and then push some more past a "detent" which will have a definitive but gentle "click" to it when you get there... then you just let go - do not "pull it back"... just let go of the lever....

Additionally, you want to make sure the bucket bottom is parallel to the ground... if the bucket edge points down, it will dig in, even when floating.... I assume you know that though....

cheers!
Thanks wally2q :)
 

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I don't use the float position. Watch the heel of the bucket to gauge how close it is to parallel with the driveway. With a 3/8" thick cutting edge, the heel should be 1/8" to 1/4" above the hard back, then a bit of down pressure will keep the bucket in contact without digging in. The front tires then act as the float mechanism by supporting more or less weight as the situation requires.

Whether using the pneumatics of the tires, or the hydraulics of the loader, in order for the bucket to float and not dig in or rise on compacting snow, the bucket needs to be level.
 

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I don't use the float position. Watch the heel of the bucket to gauge how close it is to parallel with the driveway. With a 3/8" thick cutting edge, the heel should be 1/8" to 1/4" above the hard back, then a bit of down pressure will keep the bucket in contact without digging in. The front tires then act as the float mechanism by supporting more or less weight as the situation requires.

Whether using the pneumatics of the tires, or the hydraulics of the loader, in order for the bucket to float and not dig in or rise on compacting snow, the bucket needs to be level.
Yea - I do the same depending on the situation... on my paved driveway - if I have to scrape some ice off, I may angle it quite agressively and lift the wheels off the ground to put max pressure on the edge.....

but on soft dirt driveway that is bumpy and not frozen-solid, it can "catch" and dig in depending on angle.....

i have a position indication arm on my setup (not sure if it's standard?), so I know exactly when the bucket is level once lowered.....

cheers!
 

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Note that in my post that I stated to level the bucket so that it is "parallel with the driveway". Position indicators on loader buckets indicate parallel to the plane of the contact patches of the tires of the tractor. This is satisfactory for many driveways that are close to level for their entire length, but just as many driveways are made in a series of slopes and small adjustments have to be made with the bucket curl to maintain parallelism as the slopes change. This applies even if the hydraulic float position is used.

Typically, driveways tend to be sloped down from the house to the street for drainage, and again from the house into the back yard for the same reason. Compounding this is the fact that most streets are crowned to drain water to the gutters or ditches at the side of the street. If the bucket is set level with an indicator with the tractor on the street, it will tend to dig in as the bucket crosses the transition from street to driveway and then tip up to gradually rise on compressed snow as the tractor crosses the same transition. Hence the need to constantly monitor the parallelism of the bucket to the driveway and make adjustments as required, especially on gravel driveways.

Once a hard packed snow base has been established, the adjustments get a lot easier and the base will usually support a bit of down pressure applied to the cutting edge to keep the base to a minimum thickness. To this end, I usually use my truck to pack the first snowfall or two to establish the base on my gravel driveway and leave the tractor parked.

Asphalt and concrete driveways are a whole lot easier. Lift the heel of the bucket 1/2 - 3/4" off the driveway, apply some down pressure, and scrape all of the snow off.

The above is the boiled down lessons of 40 years of an average 16 snowfalls per season cleared with a GT FEL. Yup, I put my share of divots in my driveway learning all this crap!

One more thing before someone comments, I don't know whether it's because we have a different asphalt formula in this locale, or if it's because once the temperatures go south of freezing, they tend to stay there for the duration of winter and freeze the asphalt, but I have yet to leave a mark on an asphalt driveway that lasts past the spring rains, no matter how much down pressure is applied to the cutting edge when carving down the ice and hard packed snow.
 

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One more thing before someone comments, I don't know whether it's because we have a different asphalt formula in this locale, or if it's because once the temperatures go south of freezing, they tend to stay there for the duration of winter and freeze the asphalt, but I have yet to leave a mark on an asphalt driveway that lasts past the spring rains, no matter how much down pressure is applied to the cutting edge when carving down the ice and hard packed snow.
This is because asphalt has essentially a self-healing property... once it gets warm enough, the oils and tar migrate out and re-creep / re-coat the stone/aggregate that was scraped clean on the surface during plowing.

Once you paint your driveway with sealers (typically latex based) it will be different... so hold off on re-sealing as long as you can, unless it's truly tar/sand based sealer (quite rare).
 
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