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Discussion Starter #1
Has anybody filled their 1023/1024 rear tires with liquid? If so, how much extra weight does it add? I see that JD recommends 610 pounds of weight for a ballast box, WITH liquid filled rear tires. I use my new 1023E for moving large, heavy rocks with the FEL with bucket or pallet forks.
 

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IMHO due to the size of the rear tires on a 1023E I think the rear tires won't hold much over 10 gallons each which would be about 100 #s of beet juice per rear tire. I agree with Mike that counterbalance on 3 pt is much more effective.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
IMHO due to the size of the rear tires on a 1023E I think the rear tires won't hold much over 10 gallons each which would be about 100 #s of beet juice per rear tire. I agree with Mike that counterbalance on 3 pt is much more effective.
Guys, I forgot to mention that I already have the ballast box on the tractor. I just noticed that JD’ recommends filled rear tires in addition to a 610 pound box. I do realize what ballast on the rear is for. I’ve had a Kubota L2350 for 24 years and moved a lot of heavy stuff with the loader, up to a 1050 pound rock. Sorry for the confusion.

-jj
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Have you had issues with traction or tipping forward?
Not yet. I just got it 2 weeks ago and haven’t used it much because of the rainy weather. I did move a limestone rock about 4 feet by 3 feet by 3 - 4 inches with the pallet forks yesterday. I have the ballast box on with enough sand to get the total weight up to 400 pounds or so and had no problems being tippy or unstable. I can add a few more bags of sand and get the weight of the ballast box up to about 600 pounds, but I was just wondering about adding the liquid to the tires as the manual suggests. The only other reason I can think of would be to get a little more weight on the rear without the ballast box for a bit of more traction when using the grader blade or middle buster plow.

-jj
 

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26x12-12 turf tires take 13 gallons - 140 lb Rim Guard or 105 lb windshield washer fluid per tire.

Loaded tires allow the flexibility of handling lighter loads without the need to install the ballast box. I normally have a 5' back blade on the 3ph to add to the Rim Guard loaded tires and it is adequate ballast for loader duty with my MF GC2310 SCUT, but traction is occasionally somewhat lacking, especially on hard packed snow.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
26x12-12 turf tires take 13 gallons - 140 lb Rim Guard or 105 lb windshield washer fluid per tire.

Loaded tires allow the flexibility of handling lighter loads without the need to install the ballast box. I normally have a 5' back blade on the 3ph to add to the Rim Guard loaded tires and it is adequate ballast for loader duty with my MF GC2310 SCUT, but traction is occasionally somewhat lacking, especially on hard packed snow.
Thanks Tudor. Great info on the amount of weight the liquid would add. I'll probably go ahead and do it. Do you have them filled 75%?

-jj
 

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Yup. Dealer broke the bead and poured it in.

Frost and dew lines on the tire early in the day indicate the actual fill line to be about a inch or so above the outside of the rim. Theoretical calculation of the internal volume of the tire indicates that that is the approximate correct level for a 75% fill.

Note that that level is several inches above the highest point of the air valve when the tire is installed on the tractor and pressure checks often result in the fluid getting into and potentially damaging the pressure gauge.

When airing up the tire after filling, use a pistol type of air valve/gauge with a hose that locks onto the valve stem to set the correct pressure. After installing the tires on the tractor and setting it back on the ground with any attachments installed also grounded, measure from the ground to the top of the rim and make a note of the measurement involved. From then on, the pressure can be checked with a measuring tape. For a 26x12-12 tire, a 1/4" change in the measurement equals approximately 1 psi.

If you have doubts about this methodology, try it with an unloaded tire. Check the tire pressure and take the measurement, then let some air out and check the pressure and measurement again. For my tractor 9 psi results in a measurement of 18", 14 psi (max rating for the tire) results in 19.25". Loaded or unloaded, the results will be the same.
 

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Back when I was employed by a dealer I've added fluid to many tractor tires by means of valve stem adapter BUT this is the 1st time I ever heard of breaking tire loose from rim & pouring liquid in tire. I've also checked air pressure with a pressure gauge on liquid filled tires with no adverse affect on gauge. Just clean gauge with clean water after use.
 

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When I first started using liquid ballast 47 years ago, it was calcium chloride, which is very corrosive to the el cheapo aluminum tire gauges used by Joe Handiman at the time. No amount of flushing would get it all out of the gauge and 6 months later when you went to use it, it was seized and needed a replacement.

After 3 replacements is when I started with the ground to rim measurement. Commercial tire gauges at that time were made of brass, with a price tag to match, and weren't as susceptible to the corrosive effects.
 

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I have found that dial type air gauges work well with fluid filled tires also. Calcium, beet juice or methanol antifreeze included.
 
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