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Old 09-27-2011, 03:40 PM   #1
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Default building a shed on a hill/slope

a friend and i are planning out what materials we need to build his shed out of.

the shed is 12 ft deep by 16 ft wide and will be built starting on flat ground and extending out over a slope. so the front will be sitting on level ground and the back will be up in the air, kind of like a deck off a house.

i was looking through shed designs and deck designs and i can only find ones that use 2x6 floor joist. i was thinking for a set up like this we'll probably need 2x10 joists to support the weight, 2x16 drop beam (doubled), and five 4x4 posts. he was thinking 2x8 joists, 2x12 drop beam (doubled) though.

hes planning on putting a snowmobile, 4wheeler, JD 100 series tractor and probably garden tools and such inside.

what do you guys think? how much weight can 2x8's handle vs 2x10's? obviously with a shed this big, the price difference between the two sizes will add up pretty fast. and how much weight can 2x16 drop beam vs 2x12?

were thinking for the drop beam, we would have one board on each side, sandwiching the five 4x4 posts.

he used a shed building program at Menards but its meant for flat ground. it came up with $3200 with 2x8s plus everything else, except parts needed for the slope.

the pic is just an example of the landscape, not to scale.
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Old 09-27-2011, 03:45 PM   #2
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope

Check out this shed>>http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=197575
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Old 09-27-2011, 04:33 PM   #3
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope



ok, so we need to focus in on using the correct number of footings. sounds like they used 2x6 joists on that shed. does he store his tractor in there?

i think with a second set of footings, 2x8s would be good with ten 4x4 posts.

like this
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Old 09-27-2011, 08:04 PM   #4
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope

Frost?

I don't know about MN, but around here we build for 4' deep frost. Sitting on piers on a slope, I'm thinking 5' deep to be sure I'm not doing it again in a few years. A concrete frost wall with adequate drainage from the higher side appeals to my "make it permanent" side a little more than wooden posts which have a limited life expectancy. I've seen even pressure treated lumber rot in 20 years when in contact with the ground, and concrete isn't much better for it.

It's one thing to build a fence with that method, it's something else to build a permanent structure for a couple of tons of expensive equipment.
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Old 09-27-2011, 09:51 PM   #5
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope

Quote:
Originally Posted by tranks View Post


ok, so we need to focus in on using the correct number of footings. sounds like they used 2x6 joists on that shed. does he store his tractor in there?

i think with a second set of footings, 2x8s would be good with ten 4x4 posts.

like this

10 footings will not work for your 12x16. My shed is 16x24 (obviously larger). However, thinking of simply the 16ft dimension of yours, you will need 4 running boards/posts. Under each will be a row of posts. You will really need to have 12 posts (3x4 or 4x3 whatever way you look at it). I wouldn't go 3x3 due to the 5' span between runners. You wanna keep it at 4' for the use of plywood/particulate board.

I say 12 simply for safety/durability. If you use 8, a large section of your shed will be basically unsupported. If it's the front, it'll eventually sag. If it's the middle of the shed, it'll eventually sag there. If you use ten, it'll not only leave part of it unsupported, and it'll look cheap/dumb...lol

The entire floor used 2x6s. 2x8s are extreme overkill, unless you plan on parking a dually in the shed (not joking). My tractor fits easily inside with no load-bearing issues.
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Old 09-28-2011, 12:05 AM   #6
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope

use 6X6 not 4X4. Min code for a deck is now 6X6 for support post. over time you will put more stuff in the shed and the weight will add up.
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Old 09-28-2011, 12:26 AM   #7
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frook View Post
10 footings will not work for your 12x16. My shed is 16x24 (obviously larger). However, thinking of simply the 16ft dimension of yours, you will need 4 running boards/posts. Under each will be a row of posts. You will really need to have 12 posts (3x4 or 4x3 whatever way you look at it). I wouldn't go 3x3 due to the 5' span between runners. You wanna keep it at 4' for the use of plywood/particulate board.

I say 12 simply for safety/durability. If you use 8, a large section of your shed will be basically unsupported. If it's the front, it'll eventually sag. If it's the middle of the shed, it'll eventually sag there. If you use ten, it'll not only leave part of it unsupported, and it'll look cheap/dumb...lol

The entire floor used 2x6s. 2x8s are extreme overkill, unless you plan on parking a dually in the shed (not joking). My tractor fits easily inside with no load-bearing issues.
so we can build it using 2x6 joists, 3/4" osb (floor), 2x12 drop beams (?) and 4x4 posts. with a total of 20 posts in four rows, sandwiched between the 2x12 drop beams with the 2x6 joists sitting on top.

so...
17 2"x6"x12' -joists
2 2"x6"x16' -rim/ledger joists
6 sheets 3/4" osb -floor
8 2"x12"x16' -drop beams
20 4"x4"x~8' -posts

so like this...
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Old 09-28-2011, 12:30 AM   #8
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bossgobbler View Post
use 6X6 not 4X4. Min code for a deck is now 6X6 for support post. over time you will put more stuff in the shed and the weight will add up.
so if we use 6"x6" posts can we cut out a row or two of drop beams and posts then?

maybe use ten 6"x6" posts with the four 2"x12" drop beams and 2"x8" joists.

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Old 09-28-2011, 12:36 AM   #9
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope

I would look into putting poured footings on three sides and use 8" block to build a wall up the sides. This leaves the large end open to put a set of wide doors and gives you a secure space to lock equipment etc. It also allows you to run a center beam of 2x12 triple or engineered beam on 3 footings, one on the end splitting the openning, two footings 1/3 the distance. Much better support, secure storage, and weatherproof. Spend a few more bucks and use plywood vs osb for the floor. Osb is too soft and vulnerble to damage for an exposed foor.
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Old 09-28-2011, 12:53 AM   #10
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope

i'm not sure if we're all on the same page. or maybe i'm just confusing myself but i made some new pics to clarify things. the blue is the drop beams, brown is posts and joists, gray is concrete.

first pic is side view (12ft), second is view from down hill (16ft). the shed would be built on top on this frame.
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Old 09-28-2011, 01:07 AM   #11
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope

Perfectly clear, use 8" block on the sloped sides and leave the 16' side open to install plywood doors. Now you have additional storage underneath the shed, to put lumber, tools, bikes, what ever there. It makes the shed itself much more stable and secure. You could even dig out some of the sloped ground under the shed to expand the storage underneath.
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Old 09-28-2011, 01:28 AM   #12
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope

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Perfectly clear, use 8" block on the sloped sides and leave the 16' side open to install plywood doors. Now you have additional storage underneath the shed, to put lumber, tools, bikes, what ever there. It makes the shed itself much more stable and secure. You could even dig out some of the sloped ground under the shed to expand the storage underneath.
thats a good idea and i'll suggest it to my friend. i'm not sure if he'll do it. with the landscape, it would be difficult to haul anything back up the slope.
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Old 09-28-2011, 06:31 AM   #13
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope

If it were me building that I would go the extra $$$ for real plywood on the floor, I'm not a fan of OSB
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Old 09-30-2011, 12:50 PM   #14
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope

I've built a 50x100 roof structure with only 12 posts. We had six 8x8's 20' on center on each side. My point is, unless you want to plant a lot of posts, it's usually easier to build heavier supports. Three 6x6's on each side, 8' on center with a double 2x12 would easily carry a 12x16 shed. I would build the same support on the up-hill side also, then use 2x8 floor joists 16" on center. I would also use t&g plywood or Advantech for the floor instead of OSB.
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Old 06-02-2012, 05:45 PM   #15
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Default Re: building a shed on a hill/slope

well we've been working on it, so heres an update.

he went with 2x8 floor joist and eight 4x6 posts with doubled 2x12 support beams. everything touching ground is critical structure green treated. the posts are cemented in.

32" service door and 8'w x 6.5'h garage door.

roof is 14' 2"x6"s spaced 16" with no other supports other then 2x4s screwed in between each one. it'll have 3/8" plywood with tin on top.
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