What do you cover your firewood with? [Archive] - MyTractorForum.com - The Friendliest Tractor Forum and Best Place for Tractor Information

: What do you cover your firewood with?


albertj03
09-14-2009, 12:41 PM
I've got about 3.5 cords of wood stacked with two regular blue tarps covering the top with maybe a foot or two of overhang on the sides that I flip up when it's not raining. Recently I've been noticing quite a bit of condensation on the bottom side of the tarps. Not sure if it's increased because it's getting colder at night or what. Someone had told me before not to use just regular tarps to cover wood for this exact reason, the condensation on the bottom, but I had these two huge tarps hanging around and they were the only thing that would cover all the wood. So I'm curious what do people here use to cover their wood?

albertj03
09-14-2009, 12:57 PM
Here is a picture of the wood stack before I was done stacking it all. You can see in the background there is a pile of wood and there was another pile behind the stack where my son is playing in the picture. It's all stacked now. As you can see I started off trying to cross stack but gave up since it was taking way too long with different sized pieces having to hunt for the right sized piece all the time. Not a pretty stack at all but at least it's dry and off the ground. the wood is red oak, maple and birch mostly and has been cut and stacked between 8 and 12 months but just split a few weeks ago.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v204/albertj03/photo-3.jpg

G-1
09-14-2009, 01:55 PM
Hey Albertj03, seems to me like you will be OK doing what you are doing. Just cover the top and not the sides to the extent possible. I burned wood for 30 years and many of those years, I did the same as you. The better solution, of course, would be to keep it under a roof. Eventually, I was able to keep mine in a barn, but one of those self-standing carport type enclosures would work well if there is a place to put it. They are not too expensive and can be used for other things, too. :)

Gerald

albertj03
09-14-2009, 02:13 PM
Thanks for the reply Gerald. I've noticed while driving a few people around here using some sort of black tarp that looks a little thicker than your normal tarp. Is there any advantage to using a black tarp? Does it get speed up the dryng process due to increased heat?

Jim_WV
09-14-2009, 02:33 PM
I've just used the regular blue tarps for years with no problem. Like others, I put it across the top with just a few inches overhang :rauch10: .

stint9
09-14-2009, 02:40 PM
You are correct that the black tarp will collect a bit more heat.

But I always thought the air (as in air dry) was more important than a lil extra heat from black.

I stack to get cross breeze from prevailing wind, and cover with whatever I have handy to keep heavy rain off

Works for me for many happy years...........

davidg
09-14-2009, 02:41 PM
my parents have never in 30 years covered their wood pile. it will dry as long as it is exposed to the air. rain on it will run off mostly, maybe soak bark but the vast majority drips off long before it can soak in enough to matter.

i have mine under a roof ONLY because the previous owner of my house had a wood shed built. open on all sides, but a roof directly above. i can stack wood about 5' high under it. but i also am prone to bringing a couple wheelbarrow loads up to teh house and litting them sit on the back porch. even getting wood when it is raining i don't have an issue with it.

FrankMA
09-14-2009, 02:53 PM
I got some brown and silver heavy duty tarps at Wally World that are really tough and rugged. I fold them over until they hang over the sides of the pile by about a foot on each side. I then use the grommets and some rope to tie them down so they don't blow away. My racks are 12' long x 5' high x 16" deep and hold about 3/4 of a cord each. My wood is kept dry but is still has air passing through to season properly.

G-1
09-14-2009, 03:07 PM
my parents have never in 30 years covered their wood pile. it will dry as long as it is exposed to the air. rain on it will run off mostly, maybe soak bark but the vast majority drips off long before it can soak in enough to matter.

i have mine under a roof ONLY because the previous owner of my house had a wood shed built. open on all sides, but a roof directly above. i can stack wood about 5' high under it. but i also am prone to bringing a couple wheelbarrow loads up to teh house and litting them sit on the back porch. even getting wood when it is raining i don't have an issue with it.

Davidg, can you say M A I N E ? :ROF Snow makes a difference. I was living in upstate NY during my woodburning days. Now I'm in KY and don't burn wood anymore, but I would agree with you that without any snow to speak of, a cover would probably not be needed. :)

albertj03
09-14-2009, 03:08 PM
Thanks for all of the replies. Looks like I'm on the right track and won't worry about looking for some other type of tarp.

Ken in NJ
09-14-2009, 03:12 PM
I have stacked 7 - 8 cords in the last few weeks .. I just covered it all the other day with 4' x 10' sheets of Stainless Steel that I saved from dumpsters on job sites.

I always try to only cover the top .. to allow for air flow.

These photos are only PART of my ready to burn wood on hand.

albertj03
09-14-2009, 08:30 PM
Nice setup Ken. Reminds me of a house near me where they use pieces of a metal roof to cover their wood very similiar to your setup.

Tractor-Holic
09-14-2009, 10:33 PM
Until I made a crude woodshed with a sheet metal roof,I simply used a few sheets of plywood on the top of the stack--,4x8 feet sheets,and stacked the wood only 3 feet wide,so it had 6" or so of overhang....used cement blocks or boulders to keep them on the wood so the wind wouldn't blow them off..
I found tarping the whole pile up,made fungus and mildew form,and the wood dried slower ,I'd have mushrooms growing on it by the time I went to use it half the time!..

LLigetfa
09-14-2009, 10:48 PM
I cover my wood with a metal roof, all 12 cords. 5 cord of it I bucked last year and the rest was bucked this year.

http://lh4.ggpht.com/_nX0X4MOKcKI/SlErqzOjk5I/AAAAAAAAAbU/Y4SV7aDxvj4/s640/100_0360.JPG

My wood usually sits out in the open uncovered all Summer and goes into the shed late Fall. This summer was so rainy that I moved the 2 cord that sat out under the snow into the shed early.

Later, I moved half of the 12 cord of wood I bucked up this March into the shed. Of the remaining 6 cord, I threw some EPDM rubber roofing over 2 cord of it, covering only the top. That 2 cord is my emergency supply in case the 5 cord from last year isn't enough. The wood in the shed is packed in tighter than my outdoor stacks so I expect the covered stack to be dry faster than the same vintage wood in the shed.

Small Fry
09-14-2009, 11:07 PM
I don't cover my wood till late Aug. Then I cover it with blue tarps till I bring it in the basement it sept, oct.

I do uncover it during the day, (on nice days) to let it season a bit more. It only takes a minute to pull the trap off and on.

I don't have any condensation problem.