Late model Echo trimmers [Archive] - MyTractorForum.com - The Friendliest Tractor Forum and Best Place for Tractor Information

: Late model Echo trimmers


tarheelman
07-19-2007, 09:27 PM
Does anyone have any experience with late model (i.e., 2005 or newer) Echo trimmers? I have an old one that has performed well except for a slight fuel leak that developed two years ago and that has gradually become worse since then.

I've heard that their newer models aren't as well made as the old ones. Is that true?

:thanku:

Mowerman
07-19-2007, 10:01 PM
Does anyone have any experience with late model (i.e., 2005 or newer) Echo trimmers? I have an old one that has performed well except for a slight fuel leak that developed two years ago and that has gradually become worse since then.

I've heard that their newer models aren't as well made as the old ones. Is that true?

:thanku:

Don't know about the new one's, but knowing Echo I wouldn't hesitate on buying a one.
Wheres the fuel leak at on the old one? maybe it can be repaired easily.
I have a early to mid '90's straight shaft Echo that I use... Tony

LilysDad
07-20-2007, 08:11 AM
I bought one this year based on the testimonials in MTF. It's the best trimer I've used.

tarheelman
07-20-2007, 11:24 PM
Thanks for the input, guys. Lily'sDad, if you don't mind my asking, what model did you buy and how often do you use it?

Mowerman, I've never been able to pinpoint the exact source of the leak, but it's somewhere around the carburetor. When I took it to the dealer after the leak first appeared, he said that the parts alone would cost $75. Since a new model similar to my old one would run about $200, and the leak was minor (at the time), the dealer said it would be best not to fix it. He said the leak wasn't dangerous (and at that time it wasn't), so I could just continue using the trimmer without putting money into it until the leak got worse. At that point, he said, it would be best to replace the trimmer because of the high cost of parts and labor to repair the leak.

Now, two years later, the leak has become worse. If I lay the trimmer on its side to put more line in the spool, it doesn't take long for fuel to start leaking around the carburetor (it starts leaking before I can finish reloading the spool). Needless to say, with a hot engine, that's dangerous. Consequently, it's time to replace the trimmer. I've been happy with it except for the leak. In fact, this leak is the only problem I've ever had with it, so that's why I'm considering Echo again. However, because I've heard that the new ones aren't as good as the old ones, I'm not sure if Echo is still a good choice. That's why I'm asking for input from anyone here on MTF who has a late model Echo trimmer.

Poopdeck Pappy
07-21-2007, 08:53 AM
I bought one this spring. I think it is a 251-E (or something like that), and it cost about $230. It is really powerful and I can't imagine needing more power unless I was using a brush blade.

My neighbor bought the 210 model that costs about $200, and it is great also. It has a slightly smaller motor than mine, but his seems to have way plenty of power. He's using it to trim some areas at the back of his property that are out of control, and it goes through that stuff like butter.

It's hard to make a bad choice with one of these. Straight shaft vs. curved shaft will be your biggest decision.

cadman56
07-22-2007, 08:36 PM
I don't have any newer Echo's than a '97. The first one I had was a curved shaft that was about 12 years old when I gave it to my son-in-law a few years ago. I bought a SRM-2100 in '97, which is a straight shaft. Never had any problems with either one of them. I prefer the straight shaft trimmer. The cutting head is further away from you plus I have about 80 arbs planted and I can trim under these better with a straight shaft trimmer than I could with the curved shaft trimmer. Just my .02, but I think Echo makes a real good product. :goodl:

tarheelman
07-22-2007, 10:51 PM
:thanku: Thanks again for the input, guys. It's good to see that all of the experiences shared so far have been positive.

Cadman56, my old trimmer is an SRM 2100, and it's been a good one except for the fuel leak. That's the only trouble it's ever given me.

I'll be making a purchase decision in about one to two weeks, so please keep the experiences coming. :fing32:

cadman56
07-22-2007, 11:33 PM
Bummer.... Do you know, or did the dealer tell you what the problem is and what parts are required to fix it?

boatfixer
07-23-2007, 12:58 AM
I have never owned an echo anything but have many friends that do. They all swear by them.
Don't let that little fuel leak scare you away from thier products.
I am the type that will not buy new if I can fix the old. I have an old John Deere string trimmer that I repaired this weekend. A friend of mine gave me an old homelite trimmer that had the carburetor that I needed on it. Put that on with new fuel lines and it did great.

glenn27
07-23-2007, 07:58 AM
I, also , have a SRM-2100--for last four years. I got it on sale @ end of season. I( think about 195.00 . I use it several hours each week--sometimes more when I do my MIL's lots, too. No problems at all, other than I have to replace the trimmer plastic head, as the little loops that hold the string are worn away, and won't catch the end on the string any more. That was, about $14.New gas and air filter and plug once a year, and a couple lttle shots of white lube in the gear head.:thThumbsU

echoman
07-23-2007, 03:04 PM
Tarheel, if it's the older model with the 2 line supply for fuel(non primer bulb), or does it have 3 lines? The "vent" was used with the newer styles and primer bulbs. The black grommet that seals the tanks are leak prone with use and years. I've sealed some of my newer units before adding gas with silicone sealant, and with some I left alone with little or no seepage. Where is the fuel coming from can you tell? I have a brand new SRM-340 I bought new for about half price off Ebay, but have used it little since I turned it into a brush cutter. I have an NOS SRM-300E early 80's model(non primer) that is used little also because I tended on making it more a collectors piece at this time. Engine quality is the same or slightly better than in years past. I would not hesitate and the fuel issue can be resolved yourself for a lot less I'm sure than the dealer is quoting you. Echo warrants their tools to the highest standards and hours of usage. Plus in my area, the dealers are everywhere which is why I replaced most of my used stuff with all new Echo tools. Blowers, trimmers and chain saws. I will buy a smaller trimmer when my Ryobi craps out- a 210 or 230 for sure. More than enough power for basic trimming. Plus I've seen this stuff totally abused by daily users and still starts and run fine. Thats enough proof for me.

tarheelman
07-23-2007, 09:33 PM
Tarheel, if it's the older model with the 2 line supply for fuel(non primer bulb), or does it have 3 lines? The "vent" was used with the newer styles and primer bulbs. The black grommet that seals the tanks are leak prone with use and years. I've sealed some of my newer units before adding gas with silicone sealant, and with some I left alone with little or no seepage. Where is the fuel coming from can you tell? I have a brand new SRM-340 I bought new for about half price off Ebay, but have used it little since I turned it into a brush cutter. I have an NOS SRM-300E early 80's model(non primer) that is used little also because I tended on making it more a collectors piece at this time. Engine quality is the same or slightly better than in years past. I would not hesitate and the fuel issue can be resolved yourself for a lot less I'm sure than the dealer is quoting you. Echo warrants their tools to the highest standards and hours of usage. Plus in my area, the dealers are everywhere which is why I replaced most of my used stuff with all new Echo tools. Blowers, trimmers and chain saws. I will buy a smaller trimmer when my Ryobi craps out- a 210 or 230 for sure. More than enough power for basic trimming. Plus I've seen this stuff totally abused by daily users and still starts and run fine. Thats enough proof for me.

Echoman, it's a '97 model with three fuel lines---two that run between the carburetor and the fuel tank, and one that runs between the fuel tank and the engine shroud. Your description of the leaking black grommets is the same thing that my dealer said when I took it to him after the leak first started. (The trimmer was eight years old at that time and has always been used for trimming and edging about twice monthly during the nine month mowing season.)

What would I have to do to repair the leak myself? If this can be done for less than $75, I'd rather fix the leak than replace the trimmer because, as I've said before, there's nothing else wrong with it.

echoman
07-24-2007, 08:57 AM
First off, go to the dealer, and buy a new "grommet, fuel line kit". Should be about $10 or so. Simply replace the assembly in reverse order you remove the old one. Clean off the hole area where the grommet seats in the fuel tank with some contact cleaner or alcohol of some kind real good. Do not use a petroleum based cleaner like carb spray. Use a good automotive grade RTV and run a small bead around the base of the grommet where it seals to the lip edge of the tank, and maybe a small bead around the grommet and tank once installed. I've had good success this way from additonal seepage. This is the only annoying thing I can find with my Echo products. They start and run great. I do have to tweak the Low speed screw on one of my new saws though. It's a tad cold natured. Let us know if this works out for you.

tarheelman
07-24-2007, 09:26 PM
First off, go to the dealer, and buy a new "grommet, fuel line kit". Should be about $10 or so. Simply replace the assembly in reverse order you remove the old one. Clean off the hole area where the grommet seats in the fuel tank with some contact cleaner or alcohol of some kind real good. Do not use a petroleum based cleaner like carb spray. Use a good automotive grade RTV and run a small bead around the base of the grommet where it seals to the lip edge of the tank, and maybe a small bead around the grommet and tank once installed. I've had good success this way from additonal seepage. This is the only annoying thing I can find with my Echo products. They start and run great. I do have to tweak the Low speed screw on one of my new saws though. It's a tad cold natured. Let us know if this works out for you.

:thanku: Thanks for the instructions, echoman. One question---what is RTV? (I'm not a mechanic, so I'm not familiar with some of the technical expressions that mechanics use.)

Mith_J
07-25-2007, 09:06 AM
The quality of new Echos certainly has slipped from those of old.
I fixed a fuel block on a 20 year old Echo just this last weekend. It has had no maintenance (still original plug) and has had no new parts. Ran great after I cleaned the jet.

Newer echos seem to be alot more plasticy, triggers break off, to me they don't stand out from makes like shibaura and komatsu zenoah which are both cheaper then the echo.

echoman
07-25-2007, 12:00 PM
Mith J, most manus are replacing cowls, covers and guards with the newer polymers and nylon based material to, 1 yes, make it lighter, and 2, make it cheaper to produce. Unless the tools are outright abused by getting tossed around a truck bed, I don't see why they wouldn't last as long as the 20-30 year old tools are. Again, only time will tell. Certain things should have alloy parts, covers gaurds, etc, but then again, I see no reason not to use a high strength polymer plastic for triggers and the like. Tarheelman, RTV is a silicone sealant/gasket maker. Permatex is the most common brand found almost anywhere from dept stores, hardware, and all auto stores. Permatex makes several different types for different applications, and have recently changes some of there formulas from vinegar oil based which stinks like a......... to a more environmental and sensor safe formula. The newer stuff, smells more like a grease/solvent and stays much more flexible and plyable once cured than the older vinegar base stuff.

tarheelman
07-25-2007, 08:40 PM
Mith J, most manus are replacing cowls, covers and guards with the newer polymers and nylon based material to, 1 yes, make it lighter, and 2, make it cheaper to produce. Unless the tools are outright abused by getting tossed around a truck bed, I don't see why they wouldn't last as long as the 20-30 year old tools are. Again, only time will tell. Certain things should have alloy parts, covers gaurds, etc, but then again, I see no reason not to use a high strength polymer plastic for triggers and the like. Tarheelman, RTV is a silicone sealant/gasket maker. Permatex is the most common brand found almost anywhere from dept stores, hardware, and all auto stores. Permatex makes several different types for different applications, and have recently changes some of there formulas from vinegar oil based which stinks like a......... to a more environmental and sensor safe formula. The newer stuff, smells more like a grease/solvent and stays much more flexible and plyable once cured than the older vinegar base stuff.

:thanku: Thanks, echoman! I'll give it a try. :fing32:

Mith_J
07-26-2007, 04:19 PM
Echoman, its not so much that they use plastic, all manufacturers do, but echo do seem to make parts quite vulnerable, the trigger is one thing that stands out above others.
Saw a brand new echo with a broken off spark plug, they just dont protect it, take a look at stihl, komatsu etc, they have a bit of plastic on the cowl to protect it.
I think echo are cheapening their product (like all manufacturers) but in doing so are impacting on the quality too much.