Treating Rubber feed rollers for printers? [Archive] - MyTractorForum.com - The Friendliest Tractor Forum and Best Place for Tractor Information

: Treating Rubber feed rollers for printers?


simple_john
04-07-2010, 02:43 PM
We have a bunch of HP 2200 and 2230 business deskjets at work. They are good printers, but every few months, the feed roller (a rubber coated roller that sucks up the paper) gets dried out and needs to be treated.
In the past, I have used alcohol and a q tip type swab, clean it down a few times and the printer feeds and works great.
I am beginning to rethink this - doesn't alcohol dry out rubber?

I am doing another printer - this time i used gunk automotive belt conditioner.
I would think that this would work better - long term - than cleaning the roller with alcohol.

Am i wrong? Do you think wiping alcohol on rubber dries it out more than softens it up rubber?

Besides for the printer smelling like an auto shop,:fing32:
it seems to be feeding fine. Im just not sure if belt conditioner will do any long term damage to the rubber coated roller - if it would i can go back to alcohol...
I also have some armorall type rubber conditioner, i use that if the printer rollers squeak, i would think that using this stuff would make the feed rollers too slippery and defeat the purpose... It does a great job on squeaks though... :fing32:

littletractorguy
04-07-2010, 02:51 PM
YES, using alcohol on those rollers will dry the rubber out and cause them to crack and disintegrate. You should use an a rubber revitalizing product, like MG Chemicals Rubber Re-Nue (http://www.mgchemicals.com/products/408b.html?PHPSESSID=96c8a6a057c7dac970efca40fbc631 c9). I am NOT a sales rep for them, its just the product I have used for 25 years as an AV technician, television technician and computer technician for cleaning every belt and/or roller I've come up against. Trust me, I've seen rubber rollers disintegrate...

Rubber re-conditioners generally DON'T make the rubber slipperier, they increase its "grabbiness"...

Steve (Magnolia, TX)
04-07-2010, 02:51 PM
I might would be a bit concerned about the belt conditioner leaving a 'residue' on your printed media?

I've used rubbing alcohol in the past, too, but with the same concerns.

I don't really have a better solution for you, though... :hide:

gcbailey
04-07-2010, 07:30 PM
you need Fedron! Best stuff I've ever saw for restoring rubber on electrical stuff.

http://www.teeveesupply.com/product_pages/chemicals/fedron.htm

simple_john
04-07-2010, 07:35 PM
I might would be a bit concerned about the belt conditioner leaving a 'residue' on your printed media?
It cleaned up pretty well, there was no residue after a few pages.

Thanks guys, ill try one of those items. the odor from that gunk stuff is probably not good for the office - :tsk: im hoping it doesnt eat away at the plastic printer parts.. :biglaugh:
the rubber roller was good as new though

GC: is that fedron like a high quality armorall?

gcbailey
04-07-2010, 08:09 PM
SJ, don't really know, but it's one thing definitely not to use in a closed area.

littletractorguy
04-07-2010, 08:46 PM
It cleaned up pretty well, there was no residue after a few pages.

Thanks guys, ill try one of those items. the odor from that gunk stuff is probably not good for the office - :tsk: im hoping it doesnt eat away at the plastic printer parts.. :biglaugh:
the rubber roller was good as new though

GC: is that fedron like a high quality armorall?

Usually what you do with any rubber treating compound is treat it, let it dry for 5-10 minutes or until there IS no residue. Rubber Renue is an acetone-based compound, the acetone does evaporate after you apply the compound... Its the acetone that gives it the strong smell, and DEFINITELY NOT something to use in an enclosed area... It used to come in glass jars, I knocked mine off the corner of my desk onto the waxed tiled floor of my office one day... Couldn't use my office for about 3 days after cleaning it up, and then they had to replace the tiles because the acetone stripped the finish off them.... No, its NOT good to get it on the plastic parts of the printer...Depending on the quality/grade of plastic it CAN melt it or deform it if you get enough on it... If you're doing feed rollers that are still installed in the printer and there are any plastic bits that touch the roller (feed cams etc), you can clean the roller in "strips", that is, clean the visible piece, let it dry, advance the roller, clean the next strip, etc.... Generally you just need enough on your q-tip to wet the roller slightly, you don't need to douse it... Possibly a bit of scrubbing if you notice grunge coming off on the q-tip... On tape deck and VCR pinch rollers, that grunge is oxide shed from the tape traveling between the pinch roller and the capstan. On printers, that grunge is usually toner...

One more public safety warning about this stuff, never EVER use it for significant periods in an a tine enclosed space (like on an old betamax video tape recorder, the HUGE old ones that took the 1" tapes, inside its rolling cabinet into which it has been mounted and cannot be removed without bolt cutters and a crane) and then do tequila shots with the science teacher whose old video tape recorder you just cleaned and then go to the bar with the other teachers (because it seemed like a good idea at the time) and then get home and remember at 10:30 that night you have to write up a quiz to give to your Grade 6 class the following morning... I don't think its likely to ever happen to you, but if it does, DON'T write up the quiz! Everyone will fail, and you won't have a clue why because you won't be able to remember ANYTHING about what you wrote in it....

simple_john
04-08-2010, 05:49 AM
Thanks little tractor guy, yeah, i know acetone :ROF

we used to use that stuff like water in organic chemistry...

thanks for all the info!!
:thanku::thanku::thanku:

CityFarmer
04-08-2010, 11:13 AM
I had the same issue with my 4050 laser jet a year ago and tried everything....even 600 grit emery paper. When I discovered how cheap and easy they are to fix, I just bought new ones.

Check out eBay or this site, for example:
http://www.feedroller.com/Store/index.php?cPath=1_17_86_37_342

If it is for work and under $20 per machine, it's well worth it.

Bountyhunter
04-08-2010, 02:33 PM
If residue is an issue, take some tractor pin feed paper and tear off the pin feed sides and run it through the printer.

My dot matrix printers, friction and pin feed have forward and backward capabilities at the push of the proper button. I still have two Epson MX80 units, one with Graftrax+ from the 1980's in addition to newer Panasonic and Epson dot matrix printers. Dot matrix printers are the cheapest way to print out large manuals and read me files off disks.

If you want extra absorbency, take some commercial (The brown rough stuff.) hand wiping paper and trim it down to size using a paper shear and run that back and forth through your rollers.

Glad I saw this thread in that I have a commercial letter folder, and an envelope slitter whose rollers are getting stiff.

Bountyhunter